tell me about your taming your buzzy Fuzz with an EQ

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by dewman, Jun 28, 2006.


  1. dewman

    dewman Gold Supporting Member

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    I want to dial out some of the buzziness of a fuzz pedal I have and think that an eq just after the fuzz might be the way to go. Anyone done this and can recommend a good EQ pedal? Which frequencies are typically dialed up or down when slightly taming a fuzz...
     
  2. g3rmanium

    g3rmanium Member

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    Taming a Fuzz is like driving a Ferrari at 20 km/h.
     
  3. dewman

    dewman Gold Supporting Member

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    yeah yeah...seriously though. I just want to keep everything but the buzziness and guess that a tiny bit of EQ might do the trick, just didnt know if anyone had zeroed in on this find already and knew what general frequency range could be slightly dialed down to keep the wildness but lose the bee buzzing...
     
  4. g3rmanium

    g3rmanium Member

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    I could be wrong (and I usually am), but let's say your fuzz outputs something like a square wave (you can approach a square wave with lots of clipping). A square wave has an infinite number of harmonics. If you lowpass filter it, the ratio of harmonics has not changed much. It will still sound like a square wave, although it will sound darker.

    In other words, the buzzy sound is produced by the ratio and number of harmonics the circuit produces. You can make the sound darker by removing the top end, but you will probably not make the buzz disappear because that would require the clipping to be different.

    Some fuzzes are supposed to be ugly. Live with it.
     
  5. dewman

    dewman Gold Supporting Member

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    maybe I should have asked which fuzzes can be stacked well with an EQ...it all in the language...
     
  6. KarlH

    KarlH Supporting Member

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    if you have an amp that has a preamp that sounds good when driven from the front end (ie, a 4 input marshall, top hat, dr z route 66 or kt45, the new star amps on the clean channel), AND a closed back cab with a thick grill cloth that takes away a ton of high end (ie, basketweave)... AND trim the presence down on the amp, a fuzz sounds its best, IMO
     
  7. spentron

    spentron Member

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    A low pass filter will absolutely take away the high buzz or "fizz". But a fuzz could still feel buzzy to play through if it produces a sudden and abrupt increase of harmonics when the distortion point is reached. You're really talking about the dynamic response there because almost all distortions approach square wave at high enough gainlevel.

    On a graphic, best you can do is cut the highest band or so. A pure low-pass filter is more to the point, beyond some frequency (maybe 5K for this) there will be increasing rolloff with increasing frequency to infinity. This can be found on some parametric EQs or by using a cabinet emulator/mixer output or the low section of an electronic crossover. A lot of distortion pedals have a sharp low-pass characteristic also, e.g. Tube Screamer, SD-1, DOD SAM, etc.
     
  8. JLee

    JLee Member

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    All of this techinical talk is above my head.:jo However, I use an old Ibanez 9 Series EQ after my D*A*M MKII Tonebender when I run it through my V4. I also use a Super Charged Overdrive and the amp settings that I prefer with the SCOD make the D*A*M a bit too bright. Cutting just a touch of high end on the EQ works perfectly and gives me what I want. The combo still packs plenty of gain, harmonics and fuzzy spit that I don't miss anything but that bit of high end I didn't want in the 1st place.
     
  9. cvansickle

    cvansickle Member

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    When I want less buzz from my fuzz, I run a compressor into it. If that takes away too much in the dynamics, I turn on a treble booster. It sounds like one would negate the other, but it really doesn't sound that way to me. I use this example to play the main riff of George Harrison's "What Is Life" for example. I can get all the teeth of the fuzz without the nasty high end harshness.
     
  10. dewman

    dewman Gold Supporting Member

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    now we're talking- I am clearly going to try the EQ. last night I went to the indyguitarist.com site and he has a few sound clips of a a tweek fuzz going into a fish and chips dano eq and it sounded pretty nice compared to the fuzz alone. I found that my FF running into a full drive II set for volume and not a lot of gain in the FM is a nice alternative than the EQ. mids are pushed and the fuzz, which dominates the tone, stands out nicely and the FD II adds some high end reduction, which can be dialed back in as much as wanted with the tone control on the FD II. It is more of a fuzz with smoother OD characteristics, and to me was actually really nice sounding. There are probably better combinations, but getting an EQ and trying this in the stores is on the slate for this weekend.
     
  11. Bryan T

    Bryan T Guitar Owner Silver Supporting Member

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    If I'm running a fuzz into a clean amp, then I'll usually put it through a Boss GE-7 EQ pedal. To get rid of the fizziness in the sound, I'll cut out some of the highest band. Sometimes I will also cut the next band down, though that band and the next band down are both great for making the fuzz sound more open.

    I also will run the fuzz into an overdrive pedal set to a fairly clean setting. I think that the tone control on a typical overdrive pedal is basically a low pass filter, so it does basically the same thing.

    Bryan
     
  12. Don Rusk

    Don Rusk Gold Supporting Member

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    This is a forte of the Sea Blue EQ and the Honey Bee - the sea blue will keep the fun unpridictable element of the fuzz and take out that little raspy edge and then you can adjust t he treble and bass too.....the Honey Bee kind of takes the fuzz and makes a fuzzdrive out of it, hard to go back once youve heard it.......


    you can also run a fuzz into an overdrive - tube screamers are good for this as t hey have a little treble rounding and rolloff some bass while adding some mids to help it cut t hru......
     
  13. Lifetimer

    Lifetimer Member

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    Yes, the SBEQ works really nice after fuzz!
    Go for it!
     
  14. dewman

    dewman Gold Supporting Member

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    picked up a GEB7 Boss EQ used on the sale rack at guitar center after A/Bing it with a G7 guitar EQ, both running after a Duncan Tweak Fuzz. Adding 400 through 800 Hz slightly helped add low mids and really thicken out the fuzz. Removing a little of the highest settings didnt seeme to smoothen it out as much as bumping up the low mids. Picked up the bass EQ rather than the more expensive, non sale item guitar EQ since both sounded close when bumping up the 400-800 Hz ranges. I actually liked the bass EQ since 50Hz and 120 Hz could be dialed in, giving my guitar a fatter tone when playing a low volumes (for cleans primarily, but thickens leads with the tweak fuzz.) The tweak fuzz was not ideal, my clone is way close to the original FF clone with Ge transistors, more musical but still biting. I'll make some time to A/B the EQ with my fuzz and see if boosting the mids and maybe trimimg a hair off of the top end does it. It made a world of difference with the tweak fuzz. Actually made it sound pretty decent over many tweak settings and wih gain from 2-5 pm and volume at unity with the clean. Will test for buzz removal or cover up at various volume levels with differing amount of breakup and report back if it works.
     
  15. g3rmanium

    g3rmanium Member

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    There are not that many harmonics in that range with a guitar (ignoring the initial attack).
     
  16. dewman

    dewman Gold Supporting Member

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    doesnt matter...thickened it out and the new sound lessens the buzziness and thinness...the thicker sound overcomes enough of the buzziness or ear perception of buzziness for me...less scooped...fatter all around...I am getting happier with the tone...
     
  17. Amptone

    Amptone Member

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    You haven't heard or tested a given dirt box until you bracket it by two EQ pedals.
    eq pedal > fuzz box > eq pedal

    -- Michael Hoffman
    http://amptone.com
     
  18. gulliver

    gulliver Member

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    Also .. the Frantone Brooklyn is an already tame fuzz. Very bright and subtle, sounds best stacked after a fairly dynamic pedal to give a little hi-fi rot.
     
  19. Jacobpaul81

    Jacobpaul81 Member

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    Check out my signature! =)


    I like the sound of my fuzz, but sometimes its just a bit to heavy in the bass, so I hit it with the morning dew in the mids and treble, and it gets a bit brighter.
     
  20. Amptone

    Amptone Member

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    Do you place the Morning Dew before the fuzz?

    If so, you're doing the classic move of bass-cut prior to a distortion stage, which shifts the distortion voicing away from crusty/dry to liquidy.

    People should always specify the *placement* of the eq pedal, relative to distortion. The convention, unfortunately, is to always assume and take it for granted that the eq is after distortion and there's no eq placed before the distortion except for the guitar's treble attenuation knob.

    http://reviews.harmony-central.com/reviews/Effects/product/Antelope/Morning+Dew+Equalizer%2FBuffer/10/1
     

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