the bypass discussion, other than the typical true-bypass war

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by stairs, Mar 9, 2008.

  1. stairs

    stairs Member

    Messages:
    330
    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2006
    i am trying to find as much information as i can on the bypass thing on pedals and MFX, but still cant make up my mind.

    while pedals are ok, even the non true-bypass ones, can make a decent work, i had a hard time finding a processor that doesnt suck tone obviously. this is where i started to look for answers on which whould be the point: the processors or multi fxs have, most of them, that A/D convertions the 24 bit.....but cant really figure it out: if a unit has this kind of "convertion" that stil translats in real world as "tone-suck"???

    those who tried multi fxs in amps loops, can give a opinion on how bad they change the tone?

    thanks
     
  2. stairs

    stairs Member

    Messages:
    330
    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2006
  3. stairs

    stairs Member

    Messages:
    330
    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2006
    maybe there is someone who can give a thought on this
     
  4. walterw

    walterw Gold Supporting Member

    Messages:
    34,234
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    too general of a question, i think. the better the device in question, i would expect the less tone change ("loss" might be subjective) it would have.
     
  5. soulsonic

    soulsonic Member

    Messages:
    980
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Location:
    Port Jefferson Station, NY
    I think that generally a multieffect unit in an amp's effects loop would probably sound it's best; most serious ones are designed to be run that way.

    Most of the time, a multieffect doesn't really bypass, so much as it just sort of turns the effects off. I don't think most of them are really designed to bypass anyway; if you want a straight clean sound, you just program in a patch that is set up for a nice clean tone. I always treated those sort of floor multieffects like a preamp where all the tone-shaping happens, and then the amp is just sort of there to amplify and be a neutral part of the chain.

    I draw a distinction between rackmount multieffects and floor-mount ones. The floor ones seem to usually be the all-in-one preamp/effect thing I described above, but the rackmount ones - unless it's specifically intended as a preamp/multieffect, like the Rocktron Chameleon - are usually made specifically for line level inputs from either amp effect loops or the aux loops in mixing consoles. If you plug a guitar straight into one of those kind of units, you will definitely lose sound because they are not intended to have a guitar plugged straight into them at all; the impedance and levels will likely be wrong for a guitar.

    So, it comes down to finding the right tool for the job. If you want to have the bulk of your sound come from your amp, I would recommend a rackmount multieffect that's designed to be used with line level signals like effects loops. If you want the multieffect to be your main tone tool, I would recommend either a floor-mount or rackmount, preamp/multieffect with simple neutral amp tone.
     

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice