The Dave Clark Five

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by blad51, Feb 20, 2020.

  1. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    I think it was Dave Clark's vanity. Some kids just assumed "Dave Clark" would be the guy singing and the more live shows they did, the more evident it was that Mike was what drove the songs. And that Clark wasn't that impressive of a drummer.

    And, that dense, tight sound on the records was probably super hard to replicate with the venue sound systems they had then. Clark knew he knew how to generate a really good hit recording - that was his strength so he worked that.

    Clark was a businessman first. He could be off making more money, cutting deals on all his side projects, and on cutting his bandmates out of all the money. Like James Brown, Clark thought he was some amazing entrepreneur, with barber shops and restaurants and you name it.

    I think the enterprise wrapped up the way it did, because the other guys realized they were toiling for not much gain.

    Finally, DC5 was aimed at a slightly older demographic than the Beatles, one for whom The Pill arrived 2 years too late. Beatles fans remained single, while DC5 fans started families or got drafted, etc. Which of those 2 demographics would continue to buy records?
     
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  2. ChuckEds

    ChuckEds Member

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    I got the History of the DC5 cd way back when it came out, all fifty tracks of it. There's not a bad song on it, and I was surprised at how good their tracks from the late 60s were.

    Out of all that there was one guitar solo, on Hurting Inside. They did lots of instrumentals though.
     
  3. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    That's a good point about keys. I used a Farfisa I had on long term loan from an older brother of a very close friend. NO way I could've afforded one - I didn't even have a decent guitar, just the worst Harmony Rocket made. Our money always went first into amps and speaker columns, and gasoline for borrowed station wagons.

    +

    I think the DC5 took advantage of the way African Americans and their hits ran into blockades, and so, sort of like Pat Boone, the DC5 recycled these r+b songs to cover for their relative lack of writing output in comparison to Lennon and McCartney, Brian Wilson and so on. Once white kids could gain direct access to the black writers and performers, a large part of the DC5 niche was extinguished.
     
  4. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    "The Beatles, obviously, made no secret of their love of and familiarity with American black artists, notably Motown. With the DC5, Gerry Marsden et al you didn't get that vibe - it was much more of a 'stiff white English bloke' bobbing in place, awkwardly at times."

    The above is from one of Chillybilly's posts.

    What I think happened was, Clark worked very hard to incorporate some of the rhythms and sounds and energy of the American Black artist, into the records while not doing anything VISUAL that would offend anyone's Aunt Edna.

    The Beatles borrowed from these same people also, but then mixed in generously from their own musical senses from the UK and elsewhere, and they took a chance to a degree and created a more rebellious Visual product that was intended to offend at least a few of the parents and grandparents - it was part of the plan. And the Stones went them one or two better and I knew a number of kids who got grounded for having a Rolling Stones LP inside a Beatles record jacket.

    Stiff white English bloke could sell some records when bad boy dancing meant little Sissie couldn't buy the record at all.
     
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  5. drewl

    drewl Member

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    In other words, bands that gree remained relevant.
    Bands that didn't fell by the side.
     
  6. gmann

    gmann Member

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    They didn't write their own songs. They used studio musicians, not that that's a bad thing necessarily, and they couldn't/didn't play live. When musical styles started changing in '66/'67, they didn't or couldn't make the change. Their audience evolved and they didn't. They were never groundbreaking and were always in the wake of others. Mike Smith was a great singer but great singers need material.
     
  7. VaughnC

    VaughnC Supporting Member

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    They had a nice string of hooky songs with great production, Dave Clark had a unique identifiable drumming style, Mike Smith was the perfect voice for them, and they were "pretty". They didn't have the depth of the Beatles but their star shined brightly for a brief period. I generally felt excitement when I heard DC5 songs and the Beatles made me feel happy.
     

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