The Future of Guitars

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by pedalbored, Feb 27, 2008.

  1. pedalbored

    pedalbored Member

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    What do you see as the future of guitars? The only real inovation lately has been the Gibson Robot guitar, with the self tuners. But other than that, most guitars have gone untouched or unchanged for at least 50 years. We still search out and cling to the vintage stuff from the 50's and 60's, and some use stuff older than that. Are we going to be still using those old vintage pieces in the year 2050, or do you think there will be big changes ahead in the guitar? Are we going to be searching out and using the guitars of today in the year 2050 and beyond? :crazy
     
  2. edwarddavis

    edwarddavis Supporting Member

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    I think there ave been lots of changes , many small but I rather have a guitar made today than 50 years ago. look at the many small builders and some of the cool stuff they have put out. maybe lps nd strat look the same but theres a whole big guitar world out there besides them .
     
  3. GovernorSilver

    GovernorSilver Member

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    Ergonomic guitar design still has a ways to go, but I think it will continue to develop, as more and more guitarists and wannabee guitarists (like myself) who type a lot on computer keyboards or otherwise have risks for Repetitive Strain Injury start looking for more pain-free ways to play guitar.
     
  4. Guitar Josh

    Guitar Josh Resident Curmudgeon Silver Supporting Member

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    Take a look at an LP or strat release in the 50s and tell me how they are SIGNIFICANTLY different to those of today. They aren't.

    Your 2025 LP Standard will be the same as todays with only minor differences.
     
  5. acwild

    acwild Member

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    When I look at how the vintage market is priced, it's hard to imagine that guitarists want things to change. As wood becomes harder to find (at least for acoustics), I can see more composite materials being used. I'd like to see better detailing on nuts so that we can finally get rid of the need for locking ones.
     
  6. sqadan

    sqadan Member

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    I don't think you are going to see alot of change... The Guitar market is kind of like the violin market... I don't see a lot of violinists looking for "ergonomic improvements" to the violin... I think musicians are pretty conservative when it comes to aesthetics etc... I have a kind of "if it ain't broke don't fix it" mentality when it comes to guitar design... I am not at all attracted to guitars like the Parker Fly etc... other than as oddities. I thhink the Golden age of electric guitar design came and went in the 1950s and we are now left with the best designs that will ever be offered. How many products do you know of that can continue to sell like hotcakes virtually unchanged in design for 50 odd years?
     
  7. buchla300

    buchla300 Member

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    Well, wood is a pretty important part of guitars and that is a problem. I think renewable sources of good tone woods may be needed or decent wood will become unaffordable..
     
  8. GovernorSilver

    GovernorSilver Member

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    The violin is more forgiving of bent wrists, too much tension, etc. than guitar.

    Viola though is another matter. The scale is a little longer and I've seen more violists complaining about pain. Those who can afford it thus put up the cash for ergonomically designed violas.

    I do agree though you're not going to see Klein-like guitars on Musicians Friend for $300 anytime soon.

    BTW, keep in mind the question was about the future of guitars in general, not the future of popular guitars.
     
  9. scottlr

    scottlr Member

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    There's always been folks trying to make a better mousetrap. And there's always been some folks buying the new designs. But I think the majority will stick with the classic designs. I am pretty sure I will.
     
  10. Jellecaster

    Jellecaster Member

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    Here is my most recent purchase and favorite guitar. Leo hit it out of the park on the first try - everything after that is rubbish! [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  11. GovernorSilver

    GovernorSilver Member

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  12. JimH

    JimH Member

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    I personally think the electric guitar has found it's form. new shapes aren't a new instrument - neither are tweaks, personally I see no reason for it to radically change at all. invention isn't the mother of necessity.

    Or...perhaps it has changed - by way of samples into digital form that now get mangled up through a computer by djs intop whatever 'new' sounds. but I see no reason for that mid-twentieth century guitar to change much in itself.
     
  13. Mikey2201

    Mikey2201 Member

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    A press release from Gibson and TC said that both companies share the vision of guitars loaded with all sorts of electronics. The Robot guitar is just the first. Sorry but I like playing my guitar not watching it play itself just my 2 cents
     
  14. MetalHeadd

    MetalHeadd Member

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    I think a lot will depend on how we do finding renewable resources for various tone woods. Brazilian rosewood is all but used up, and I've read accounts that Indian rosewood isn't that far behind. We might see different wood usage, and increased experimentation with composite materials.

    I think there's always going to be more bells and whistles, more electronics, more this and that, but I think the majority of players will still play electric guitars that aren't much different from those today electronically. New pickup models, body shapes, neck carves, but things will mostly stay the same.
     
  15. FractalGarden

    FractalGarden Member

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    I've always thought a guitar that easily allows the swapping of any other pickup, much like a USB port, but obviously more robust. I think there is such a guitar, an Ampeg I think, but it's limited to its own pickups.

    I think the general shape of guitars has peaked, though. Singlecut, doublecut, pointy shape ... not much left to try out that would be better than what's available now.
     
  16. GovernorSilver

    GovernorSilver Member

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    Bass guitars sure have evolved a lot more than electric guitars. Classic Fender designs are still popular but you see a lot of Warwicks and other non-Fenders out there. Gibson fell far behind early in the bass guitar world and hasn't recovered.
     
  17. Rock Johnson

    Rock Johnson Member

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    IMHO, the future will be in the use of more and more composite materials for greater guitar-to-guitar consistency, and in the idea of a multi-voice instrument. Just about everyone offers a piezo and / or a synth option on at least some of their models, although Godin seems to be leading the pack in that regard.

    I don't know where, exactly, that will go, but I do know that musicians are looking for more and more versatility from the same instrument.
     
  18. a1briz

    a1briz Silver Supporting Member

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    The future..'One Guitar to Rule them All'

    Line6 started the concept with the Variax.

    Fender took it one step further by combining modelled guitars and a 'real' guitar. So did this guy: http://www.exit45.com/VaxV

    My bet is the manufacturers are going to try and improve this process.
     
  19. kludge

    kludge The droid you're looking for

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    Synthetic materials will replace tonewoods more and more, as tonewoods become more and more rare. This is especially true of acoustic guitars, where top-quality spruce is going the way of the dodo.

    The biggest and most important trend I've seen is the increasing quality of budget guitars. Chinese and Indonesian instruments these days are AMAZING.
     
  20. Jahn

    Jahn Listens to Johnny Marr, plays like John Denver Supporting Member

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    Don't forget the 80's. Plenty of wild futuristic stuff was being mainstreamed at that time- pointy guitars, active electronics, dive bombing whammies, locking nuts and tuners, headless wonders, midi/synth getups, you name it. Some of that still hangs around decades later.

    but the old standbys are still around - tele, strat, paul, es-335 types. whatever cool innovations are in the future, no worries, the past will still be there.
     

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