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The Great Bigsby Debate! (yes / no) ... and let's see your Bigsby Equipped Guitars!

Bigsby Vibrato?

  • Yes

    Votes: 147 66.8%
  • No

    Votes: 73 33.2%

  • Total voters
    220

Telechamp

Member
Messages
2,444
GUwjHZV.jpg
 

ClickClack

Member
Messages
1,352
I have never had any objection to the way that they look, and I quite like the way that they sound in the hands of a skilled player. (Johnny A is particularly adept at using a Bigsby tremolo arm.)

However, life is too short for me to ever again have to deal with changing strings on one. YMMV, and hey, more power to you if you like 'em. Wiggle and wobble to your heart's content. Never again for me.

When I bought my used Gibson SG in the 70s, it was equipped with a Bigsby tremolo tailpiece, but I quickly learned my lesson when I broke a string onstage and had no backup guitar (couldn't afford one then). I had the Bigsby removed and replaced with a stop tailpiece right away. That was the first modification I had done to a guitar, and it was one of the best decisions I ever made.
 

Johnms4

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
332
I want everything in that picture! Love the choice of pickups on the Kolln too.
Am lucky to be able to have all of it. The pickups are great, and are made by TK Smith - who also seems to make guitars that look pretty great as well. They sound fantastic while pairing well with the guitar, and really shine with an amp turned up a good bit.

edit: Also, have to say there are so many great looking guitars in this thread.
 

Rick CD

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
928
I have never had any objection to the way that they look, and I quite like the way that they sound in the hands of a skilled player. (Johnny A is particularly adept at using a Bigsby tremolo arm.)

However, life is too short for me to ever again have to deal with changing strings on one. YMMV, and hey, more power to you if you like 'em. Wiggle and wobble to your heart's content. Never again for me.

When I bought my used Gibson SG in the 70s, it was equipped with a Bigsby tremolo tailpiece, but I quickly learned my lesson when I broke a string onstage and had no backup guitar (couldn't afford one then). I had the Bigsby removed and replaced with a stop tailpiece right away. That was the first modification I had done to a guitar, and it was one of the best decisions I ever made.
I’ve got that same ‘71/‘72 SG and just could not make the Bigsby work. Almost had it replaced for a stop piece but instead just essentially decked it instead, didn‘t want to drill and patch new holes and potentially devalue it. And the weight of the Bigsby, I suspect, might help prevent some of this so called “neck dive“ I read about all the time :stir
 

Jon Silberman

10Q Jerry & Dickey
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
43,497
The older and more experienced I get, the more I like my Bigsbys. They're flat out ergodynamically comfortable, perform great for my uses (I'm no dive bomber), are virtually indestructible, and it's a breeze to change strings when you do them one at a time or have the proper tool.
 

scott

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,116
I like them unless they are on a guitar where the tension bar is too close to the bridge. I prefer no tension bar at all.
On a Les Paul they are useless. Not only do the strings have to drag over the saddles but also over the back of the bridge as they dive down toward the tension bar at a drastic angle totally unsuitable for the intended use.

Now this one is cool and I actually like how the Bigsby is used on this one.
Do the strings stay in the saddles?

 

sunking101

Member
Messages
2,919
For me Bigsbys look great on big Gretsch guitars, Gibson 355s and other large-bodied hollows and semis but on LPs and Teles etc....not so much.
 

nowhere

Member
Messages
1,033
Am lucky to be able to have all of it. The pickups are great, and are made by TK Smith - who also seems to make guitars that look pretty great as well. They sound fantastic while pairing well with the guitar, and really shine with an amp turned up a good bit.

edit: Also, have to say there are so many great looking guitars in this thread.

I've had an itch for a Bigsby inspired guitar for a while now. I don't have the cash for one at the moment but I've been toying with the idea of those pickups and some Bigsby like cosmetics on a Kauer Superchief for example.

I'm lucky enough to have had the chance to play a Vibro-King and Dual Professional back in the 90s and loved them.

And you are absolutely right about there being some great guitars in this thread too@
 

Jayyj

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
10,553
Restringing woes.

There's a knack to Bigsbys and once you know it they're not really any harder than anything else.

Firstly, pre-bend the end of the string so it conforms to the shape of the roller - I do this around my little finger but a pen works well. That will stop it springing off the peg and dramatically reduce the fiddliness of the restring.

Secondly, once the string is on the peg, keep a finger over it and pull the length of the string along the the neck and hold it there, then once you have tension on it you can take your finger off it and sort out the headstock end. With practice it should be easy enough to hold the string with one hand and thread it around the post with the other but if that feels clumsy use a capo to hold it there.

Once you've done it a few times it becomes fairly straightforward, it's just a question of knowing a couple of workarounds.
 

Enjoicube

Member
Messages
33
Just don’t like the look of them, and I don’t use a tremolo much in my playing (don’t even get me started on neck shaking). While I may accept a factory installed Bigsby on a new guitar, on It’s a deal-breaker for me when installed after-market.
 




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