The guitar model you find most consistent\inconsistent...

BadAssBill

Gold Supporting Member
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7,400
I was looking at some 335 threads and a few years back I remember looking for a 1970's 335, possibly in Walnut. I'd tried about 20 over the course of the year but didn't buy one because I felt between any 335 of any year...they were just so inconsistent with regards to "the one". Some...were flat out amazing (that happened to be out of my price range)....but many were not necessarily bad....just meh.

I think the Martins are the most consistent....I could probably count on one hand the number of average ones I've played, even the lower price models....

Is there a model you just can't seem to find consistency with?
 

ProfRhino

Member
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7,124
the consistency award certainly has to go to IBZ (shredders in particular) and Yamaha. :aok
PRS are quite reliable here as well, as long as we're talking identical specs (!)

the incontinence :oops: oops, I meant intercontinentacity, nevermind - the other :jo award goes to anything Gibson, and Fender CS as well.

in my experience, ymmv,
Rhino

unlike you, I would put Martins in the "play before you pay" category though ...
 

tarheelalum

Member
Messages
492
Consistent quality guitars to me are Japanese made Ibanez and Korean made Schecter, ESP/LTD and Reverend. Inconsistent guitars anything made by Gibson. Gibson has some great guitars and some garbage guitars. You never know with them.
 

rhinocaster

Silver Supporting Member
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23,238
I like Teles....the Fender Nocaster is the most consistently great Tele I've played. I must have played 15 of them so far and only was wasn't great, it was just good.
 

SupremeDalek

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737
Martins are incredibly consistent when regarding build quality and such, but there's is a lot of difference between individual instruments. I've played many duds of one model only to grab a gem from the next try. For a standard it's a play first sort of deal.

Gibson is there most inconsistent company I've seen, followed by Fender. Finding paint runs, binding issues, and bad frets on a $3000 guitar drives me nuts (I'm looking at you 335 from Sam Ash...). As far as Fender goes there are just too many options. Some should like garbage while others are playable. It's very very strange.

If I'm looking to buy "sight unseen" I can reliably purchase a PRS and basically know what I'm going to get.
 

ProfRhino

Member
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7,124
Martins are incredibly consistent when regarding build quality and such, but there's is a lot of difference between individual instruments. I've played many duds of one model only to grab a gem from the next try.
yup, that's what I was talking about.
bad tone is an absolute no-no, finish flaws might be acceptable on a killer instrument, depends.
ymmv,
Rhino
 

soulman969

Member
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3,650
Although I don't own one.....yet, from experience Schecter and Ibanez seem to be some of the best "out of the box" playable imports.

Of the US companies I'd give Taylor a nod and also Epiphone even though they are imported. I've experienced inconsistencies with every Fender, Gibson and G&L I've played and have too little experience with PRS yet to say.

Fender Telecasters and Fender Basses have been among the more consistent from them.
 

Average Joe

Member
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11,643
Yamaha may be the most consistent brand, at least for the budget range acoustics which is mostly what I have experience with. The music school stuff. Yamaha is always good value and pretty darned consistent soundwise.
 

Luecack

Member
Messages
226
When I was shopping for my acoustic, I was surprised how similar every Taylor I played was. Something I was not expecting, especially on an acoustic, that seems to me would be more complex to produce vs electric. One of the reasons I picked it over a Martin in the same range.
 

MikeMcK

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
5,136
Hamer consistent / Fender/gibson least consistent
Took the words out of my mouth. Hamers were the only set-neck guitar I could buy sight unseen and know it was going to be great. On the other side of the coin, Les Pauls are always all over the map.
 

ProfRhino

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7,124
Took the words out of my mouth. Hamers were the only set-neck guitar I could buy sight unseen and know it was going to be great. On the other side of the coin, Les Pauls are always all over the map.
in theory, I love Hamers.
in real life however, I found most of them (very few exceptions) to have really small necks. :(
are there any "safe years" with medium big necks, like a PRS wide / fat or Gibson's 50s profile for example ?
cheers,
Rhino
 

MikeMcK

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
5,136
in theory, I love Hamers.
in real life however, I found most of them (very few exceptions) to have really small necks. :(
are there any "safe years" with medium big necks, like a PRS wide / fat or Gibson's 50s profile for example ?
cheers,
Rhino
No '50's profile necks, unfortunately, or I'd still be playing nothing but Hamers. I do know there were a couple of years (~ 1993) where the necks were especially small.

Slightly longer version... at one point a few years before Hamer's demise, there was talk of offering a fatter neck profile. One of the drivers was a series of short runs of Junior-style (single P-90, thinner headstocks) Hamers, originally commissioned by Greg at BCR Music long before it was a standard model. Since I had one on order from the second run I offered to loan them my '59 Junior to copy the neck profile. There was some interest, but would have required more resources than were available.

When I gravitated towards fatter necks in general, I sold a lot of Hamers. It was never lost on me (and pissed me off sometimes) that I was selling some great guitars to fund much more expensive guitars that were just OK. But if you didn't need fat necks like I do, there was a time when you could find used killer guitars for under a thousand bucks. That will never happen again.
 

RCM78

Member
Messages
5,887
Another vote for Hamer USA. I've had three over the years that were exceptional quality!
The two Peavey Wolfgang's I had (Still have one) were so consistent that I had to look down to see which one I was playing.
 

ProfRhino

Member
Messages
7,124
No '50's profile necks, unfortunately, or I'd still be playing nothing but Hamers. I do know there were a couple of years (~ 1993) where the necks were especially small.

Slightly longer version... at one point a few years before Hamer's demise, there was talk of offering a fatter neck profile. One of the drivers was a series of short runs of Junior-style (single P-90, thinner headstocks) Hamers, originally commissioned by Greg at BCR Music long before it was a standard model. Since I had one on order from the second run I offered to loan them my '59 Junior to copy the neck profile. There was some interest, but would have required more resources than were available.

When I gravitated towards fatter necks in general, I sold a lot of Hamers. It was never lost on me (and pissed me off sometimes) that I was selling some great guitars to fund much more expensive guitars that were just OK. But if you didn't need fat necks like I do, there was a time when you could find used killer guitars for under a thousand bucks. That will never happen again.
thanks for your detailed reply, even if I don't like the message. :aok

most I have seen were somewhat acceptable, I don't want to exaggerate the issue, but when buying a guitar, the neck had better suit me perfectly, else - what's the point ? :nuts

sorry, Hamer, but there are alternatives.
... if my baby don't love me, her sister will ! :p
lol, and ymmv,
Rhino
 

SupremeDalek

Member
Messages
737
When I was shopping for my acoustic, I was surprised how similar every Taylor I played was. Something I was not expecting, especially on an acoustic, that seems to me would be more complex to produce vs electric. One of the reasons I picked it over a Martin in the same range.
This was my issue with a Taylor. Yes they're all reliably similar, but I still haven't played one, ever, that gave me a "wow!" moment. Not hijacking the thread, just an observation I made.
 

Motorhed

Member
Messages
7,548
Gibson in general for me. I seem to find the one for me of a particular model and no other one I play ever seems to do anything for me. It's been the case for Les Pauls and Firebirds so far. I have found two SGs though, one was a blueburst SG Supreme and I had no way of affording it but visited it when I could and played it many times before it finally sold. It was fancier than what I'd typically go for with the flamed maple top and gold hardware but it just felt and sounded so good. Then, later, an '80 SG Firebrand came along that I clicked with and I was able to buy it.
 

jwguitar

Member
Messages
5,880
Consistent quality guitars to me are Japanese made Ibanez and Korean made Schecter, ESP/LTD and Reverend. Inconsistent guitars anything made by Gibson. Gibson has some great guitars and some garbage guitars. You never know with them.
Guitars that are made by companies such as Cort, Samick, and WMI in general are going to be good no matter what name is on the headstock. When I buy a guitar I always try to figure out what factory the guitar originates from. Indonesia, Korea, and Japan have some of the most consistent quality control in the world in their guitar factories. All the USA guitars are different since they are made in their own respective factories. Right now the country with the most inconsistency is China. Some of the guitars they produce are great like Eastman and Hagstrom and some guitars are just outright junk. It probably reflects more on the fact that it is such a large country and there are a lot of factories over there.
 




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