• New Sponsor: ShipNerd, Ship Your Gear with Us... for less! Click Here.

The Guitar Scene When You Started Playing

Kenny Blue

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,633
1964.... The BEATLES ! ! ! Also... The Ventures, Beach Boys, The Yardbirds, The Stones ....
 

S. F. Sorrow

Member
Messages
8,347
Late 60's my hippie uncle had a white strat with a big tuck n roll Kustom amp. There were psychedelic lights. Psychedelic posters on the wall -some with body painted naked girls. By 1970 he was getting into prog and King Crimson was my muse. Fripp, then Hackett. Had to get a Les Paul Black Beauty....
 

Fulldrive-1

Senior Member
Messages
5,926
Early Seventies for me.

Hendrix, Cream, etc were still hugely influential. There was lots of Black Sabbath and Led Zep, and Deep Purple were also huge.

One thing I did also tap into early. Iggy's "Raw Power," featuring James Williamson, came out just as I picked up a guitar. There wasn't a name for what they were doing back then. Only a few thousand people bought the album, but I was one of them.
 

L0ki

Member
Messages
1,268
Metal and shred. Started playing in the mid-80s in high school. I was drawn to much older music and really didn't like hairspray , helium-vocal stuff. It shaped me musically in that I just don't have a "metal" bone in my body. EVH is probably the only player from that era that I like.

When friends my age would play me stuff like Dio, I just did NOT get it at all. I still don't.

Luckily between friends and relatives, I found some great records to learn from.
This could be my post :beer

Almost everybody was into shred metal, how fast you could play equated to how good you are..... I was into the Stones, Clapton, Zeppelin, and Duane Eddy, Chuck Berry, the Ventures to a lesser degree. Fortunately my friends were closer to my tastes.
 

sinasl1

Member
Messages
8,985
Something I've been thinking about lately, what was the guitar scene like when you started playing and how did that influence you?

I started playing electric guitar in 1983. Eddie was the undisputed king of rock guitar. Randy had just died the year before. Right around that time frame the following big name players debuted on the scene: Yngwie, Vai, SRV, Lynch, Jake, DeMartini, Gillis/Watson, Vivian, Smith/Murray, The Edge and I'm sure I'm leaving out some cats.

I remember being overwhelmed by how many great new players there were and just trying to absorb it all and figure out who's playing I really connected with.
I started then, too. My 1st love was The Beatles, The Who, etc but I dug hard rock and metal too. The level of playing was quite high and you had to practice hard, be able to pull off fairly complex parts, and just basically have skills, just to be even considered for bands and whatnot. I think it really helped me later on in my career, when it became necessary to cop parts and tones off of albums for touring gigs, etc.

Kids that missed all that and grew up in the 90's- I noticed there was a whole serious lack of skills needed to be a sideman in the generation that came up right after me. Which actually kept me and my pals that did sideman work employed! Nobody that grew up in that generation seemed to know how to cop parts or tones very well. However, it could be argued that because those kids worked mainly on writing songs and their own uniqueness, maybe it's just a different skill set they possessed, for writing and creating etc.

By the time the NEXT generation rolled around, i.e. kids that grew up post-grunge and in the internet era, all of a sudden the chops level went up again and you routinely see kids with crazy chops and nice rigs with lotsa pedals/tones and whatnot. That's my take on it, anyway :)
 

Ethn Hayabusa

Member
Messages
1,532
It was awesome. Flying in a Blue Dream and Passion and Warfare had just come out, Ah Via Musicom and Southern Steel came shortly. By the time I was in middle school Dream Theater's Images and Words was out. So much fun buying albums back then.
 

Nonvintage

Member
Messages
1,241
From 1963 to 1973 was where I'm primarily influenced. It all started with the Beatles and Stones, for me. But what really interested me was the English blues invasion. Beck, Clapton, Page and finally Jimi Hendrix was from another galaxy. After that became the English guy's heroes BB, Freddy and Albert King.
 

parts

Member
Messages
94
I first started about 1960..11 years old. I lived west side of Chicago by then..grew up earlier near west..many blues bars and jazz clubs. No remembrance of exactly why..
Heard those men working the guitar..while sitting outside.. By 12 I was let in..had to hang by the door..

..and it was on..
 

Slotunes

Member
Messages
302
I grew up in the South Bay section of L.A. in the 60s and 70s. There was a lot of great players who went on to stardom. David Pack from Ambrosia lived up the street and we'd ride our bikes and listen thru the garage door. When I hit Highschool, Ambrosia played my Junior Prom, playing spot on Beatles tunes! They then got signed and did quite well. Much harder edge early on. We also had Blues Image play my senior prom "Ride Captain Ride". Another great band. Larry Carlton went to the junior college I started at. His legend was already set in stone at that time. So you had some badass players to live up to. It made you practice harder and a lot more self conscious! I remember looking in the LA Times Calendar section and there was so many classic concerts Pink Floyd[front row LA Sports Arena] Humble Pie at Long Beach Arena, REO, Frampton Comes Alive Tour and Skynrd together!that it was tough to pick which ones to go to...and I was 14! Not to mention going to see Robben Ford at the Golden Bear opening for Alan Holdsworth and most tickets were 8-10.00!My GAS started with the Recycler and Music Emporium Catalogs.....In the words of Dylan: "take a look around, youll never see these times again"!
 

rob13v

Member
Messages
1,501
I started in the mid 80s as a kid, but by 11 or 12, when I got serious, what was popular didn't matter. I was into Sabbath, Randy, EVH, SRV, Hendrix, Clapton,, punk rock and Zep. If a friend or a girl I was into liked Pearl Jam or whatever, I'd learn it, but those earlier influences made it so much easier to figure that stuff out.
 
Messages
979
'69, '70, along in there. When James Taylor's "Sweet Baby James" was released, I went crazy. Learning that stuff was like studying classical guitar, I guess. Nugent, Leslie West, Jimi, Eric, B.B., Terry Kath,Steve Howe, Johnny Winter, Dickey Betts, Duane--When the live CSN&Y album came out, I wore that one down so much, you could see through the records. Ry Cooder, David Lindley--I read an article about Lindley, and Kaleidoscope, and all the instruments Lindley either played, or emulated, so I started taking strings off, retuning (the article was in "Hit Parader"--remember that?) Chet Atkins, Doc Watson---Mark Farner, and a lot of guys whose names weren't on the back of the album. All the Southern rock guys--the Toy Factory played the fairgrounds--That was after Toy Caldwell came home from Viet Nam.

First good electric was a Harmony Rebel--The tuners were so wretched, the plastic knobs broke off. And some Harmony amp, with a racing stripe in the grille cloth. What a mess.
 

kevin hart

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,742
Started in late 60's, but got more serious in the early 70's when I started playing in bands.

Way more venues to play at back then. Schools, churches, local granges and legion halls. Plus clubs with nice stages that were really designed around having live bands, as opposed to the sports bars you see today that stick a band in the corner to help generate a few extra bucks on slow nights.

Early influences were diverse, Paul Kossoff, Eric Clapton, Terry Kath, Peter Frampton. By the late 70's it was Larry Carlton, Jeff Baxter, Terry Haggerty, Mark Knopfler.
 

Crocker

Member
Messages
1,077
1972/73...Roy Buchanan, Rory Gallagher, Led Zeppelin, Rolling Stones, Chuck Berry, Mountain, Johnny Winter, Beatles, Pink Floyd, Leo Kottke, Jeff Beck, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, Hound Dog Taylor...
 

gmann

Member
Messages
8,820
Beatles, Stones, EC and Hendrix. Not bad for the time. Then high school and it was the Allman Bros. Band, Joe Walsh and Billy Gibbons. Not bad either.
 

Bankston

Member
Messages
16,350
I started then, too. My 1st love was The Beatles, The Who, etc but I dug hard rock and metal too. The level of playing was quite high and you had to practice hard, be able to pull off fairly complex parts, and just basically have skills, just to be even considered for bands and whatnot. I think it really helped me later on in my career, when it became necessary to cop parts and tones off of albums for touring gigs, etc.

Kids that missed all that and grew up in the 90's- I noticed there was a whole serious lack of skills needed to be a sideman in the generation that came up right after me. Which actually kept me and my pals that did sideman work employed! Nobody that grew up in that generation seemed to know how to cop parts or tones very well. However, it could be argued that because those kids worked mainly on writing songs and their own uniqueness, maybe it's just a different skill set they possessed, for writing and creating etc.

By the time the NEXT generation rolled around, i.e. kids that grew up post-grunge and in the internet era, all of a sudden the chops level went up again and you routinely see kids with crazy chops and nice rigs with lotsa pedals/tones and whatnot. That's my take on it, anyway :)
Exactly. There was peer pressure among the guitar players I was buddies with to be able to play those licks in that era. But it was a positive pressure for me and even though I didn't take formal lessons I was lucky that more experienced players were willing to show me a few tricks of the trade.
 

Tony

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,947
1990... I was 14. EVH was still king. 80s pop/metal (Warrant, Poison, etc) was all over the radio. Nirvana showed up and suddenly guitar solos weren't as cool.
 

27sauce

Senior Member
Messages
37,204
I started in '91/'92.

I lived in the middle of nowhere, and while we did have music scene, my main exposure was MTV and Guitar World/GFTPM/GP.

I was in to heavier alternative stuff, along with what my parents liked. So, it was everything from Aerosmith to Corrosion of Conformity, Dwight Yoakam to Sepultura. Achtung Baby. Effects pedals, fuzz pedals.

Lots of alternative guitar, Nirvana, Soundgarden, Jane's addiction.

Another thing that was happening was the boomer nostalgia thing. I ate it up, Hendrix, Doors, Beatles. There was an anniversary or retrospective every month, it seemed.

CCR Greatest hits, Beatles Anthology, LZ Box set, Stones on tour, Pink Floyd on tour…

And oddly enough(being from Texas) ZERO SRV in my world, DNA. I did go see him on that last tour. My dad was slightly in to him, but much more of a Cray/Jimmie Vaughan fan. Lots of Deguello and Tejas, though. Dad liked those, for some reason.

I was big in to pawn shops, as I still am now. My weekends were spent picking, Norlin and CBS era…as far as the eye could see. A new Les Paul was around 1200, but you could pick up a '69 Deluxe for around 700/800. Lots of trading, lots of hits and misses.
 
Messages
873
I started in the mid 90's. I didn't understand why my highschool counterparts that were playing grunge covers got so much more attention than my little three piece prog band. I was trying to shred and one one gave a **** about fast guitar. What a misguided youth I was. Hell, I still play music no one wants to hear haha.
 

Outlier

Member
Messages
1,471
I was starting in the mid 80's. Page and Iommi were still huge influences at that time but I remember spending hours trying to nail Crazy Train or Rocks you Like a Hurricane on an acoustic. My first overdrive pedal was my brain. I had to imagine what it would sound like through a stack of marshalls LOL.
 






Trending Topics

Top Bottom