The insane case of Brian Banks - Is this justice?

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by Tylenol Jones, May 25, 2015.

  1. A-Bone

    A-Bone Montonero, MOY, Multitudes Gold Supporting Member

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    Justice is an abstract concept, not an actual legal outcome.
     
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  2. eflatminor

    eflatminor Member

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    There a special place in hell for the woman that lied and put that man in jail, but as to justice for him, the only thing that can attempt to make it right is money from the city/prosecutors that falsely prosecuted him and from the woman that lied. Since we can't turn back time, I think that's the best we've got.
     
  3. Tylenol Jones

    Tylenol Jones Member

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    Nevertheless, this man lost 5 years of his life, probably some friends and family members, potentially a career as a football player in the process, and one could argue this event ruined his life.

    It doesn't look like he took her to court either which means she gets away scot-free for making a false accusation and ruining somebody's life.
     
  4. fjblair

    fjblair Silver Supporting Member

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    I think everyone has a grasp on the point the OP is making.
     
  5. A-Bone

    A-Bone Montonero, MOY, Multitudes Gold Supporting Member

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    When people invoke concepts like justice, it makes me wonder if this is true.

    There is no possible just outcome in this situation, is what I mean. Time can't be given back. Opportunity costs are unrecoverable. There is arguably even reason to wonder whether his reputation can ultimately be rehabilitated.

    It does sound like this young man has a very healthy attitude in terms of seizing the opportunity to share his story and hopefully make a positive impact.
     
  6. eflatminor

    eflatminor Member

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    No doubt. The notion is heart breaking, IMO.

    If a statute of limitations prevents her from being criminally prosecuted, he always has the option of suing her civilly. Of course, it's the prosecutors that have the deeper pockets, but that shouldn't prevent her from owing him money for the rest of her pathetic life!
     
  7. tonyhay

    tonyhay Supporting Member

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    If what she did isn't criminal, it should be. In my view she fully deserves a prison sentence.
     
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  8. scotth

    scotth Member

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    The Wiki link says that he faced a possible 41 years, but pleaded down to 5.

    41 years!

    I agree with this 100%. If he got 41 years in prison, would it have been any different than if she had murdered him?
     
  9. A-Bone

    A-Bone Montonero, MOY, Multitudes Gold Supporting Member

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    One of the more disconcerting aspects of this case is that the system made it more attractive for an innocent man to plead guilty to five years in prison than to go to trial and risk a sentence pf 41 years.
     
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