The Jesus Music Documentary

reo73

Member
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1,328
Just watched this and found it quite well made and informative ($5.99 rental on Amazon). Explores the roots of Contemporary Christian Music starting with Jesus Movement music in the late 60s, the pioneers of Christian Rock in the 70's, the forming of the industry in the 80s, the explosion of the industry in the 90s and the P&W movement in the 2000s. Lots of great interviews with the some of the early pioneers and current artists.

Huge respect to the late Billy Graham for recognizing the importance of a very controversial Christian Rock movement, and making it a key component of some of his later year revival gatherings.

I related with how big DC Talks Jesus Freak album was. I had never really listened to Christian Rock up to that point but that album was undeniably good.

Anyone else watched this yet?
 

A-Bone

Montonero, MOY, Multitudes
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
108,465
Just watched this and found it quite well made and informative ($5.99 rental on Amazon). Explores the roots of Contemporary Christian Music starting with Jesus Movement music in the late 60s, the pioneers of Christian Rock in the 70's, the forming of the industry in the 80s, the explosion of the industry in the 90s and the P&W movement in the 2000s. Lots of great interviews with the some of the early pioneers and current artists.

Huge respect to the late Billy Graham for recognizing the importance of a very controversial the Christian Rock movement, and making it a key component of some of his later year revival gatherings.

Anyone else watched this yet?

Thanks for the reminder.
 

Tony

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,224
I related with how big DC Talks Jesus Freak album was. I had never really listened to Christian Rock up to that point but that album was undeniably good.

The Jars of Clay debut (right around that time) was great too. It holds up today.

I spent some time in that scene from ‘95 to ‘01 or so. Made some great friends. A few of them are still at it.
 

reo73

Member
Messages
1,328
The Jars of Clay debut (right around that time) was great too. It holds up today.

I spent some time in that scene from ‘95 to ‘01 or so. Made some great friends. A few of them are still at it.

Totally, those 2 albums were huge at the time. That and a bit oif Cademons Call. Was a new direction in sound from the stuff that people like Steven Curtis Chapman were putting out.
 

reo73

Member
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1,328
Oh trust me, I've lived it for a long time, but that doesn't make it untrue. Definitely interested in the doc.

I view early Christ Tomlin and some of the early Passion albums as being more U2ish. Hillsong to me is more Cold Play. But I guess Cold Play got dubbed a bit of a U2 sound. But I have played a ton of Hillsong over the years and don't really remember doing rhythmic dotted 8ths on those songs.
 

Anthony Gring

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
4,270
Thanks for the heads up. Been involved for a long time but no electric playing since March 2020..
Look forward to watching.
 

Tony

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,224
Just watched this and found it quite well made and informative ($5.99 rental on Amazon). Explores the roots of Contemporary Christian Music starting with Jesus Movement music in the late 60s, the pioneers of Christian Rock in the 70's, the forming of the industry in the 80s, the explosion of the industry in the 90s and the P&W movement in the 2000s. Lots of great interviews with the some of the early pioneers and current artists.

My time in that part of the music biz was during the explosion in the late 90s and into the P&W movement in the 00s. It was an interesting scene in Southern California at the time.

I played in a few bands but was more of a hired gun sort of guy, playing at the bigger churches in SoCal (who started hiring their players), on sessions and with P&W bands playing the bigger conferences and such.

There were lots of great people and cool bands but it always felt like a scene that didn't understand itself. I think lots of the bands (including the ones I was in) would've done just as well to go play in the general market but got pigeonholed, and once you're in that place and you're making enough money to eat, it's hard to shift. And it was rock and roll, but, not really... if that makes any sense.

Anyway. Just thinking thru several of the bands I got to share the bill with back in the day - by that I mean we played the same shows, not that I played IN these bands - these are the ones that come to mind that I thought were really good bands...

  • Switchfoot - we beat them in a battle of the bands in... '98, maybe? Ha. I think they won in the long run.
  • Mercy Me - we were supporting them on tour right when "I Can Only Imagine" went huge.
  • All Together Separate - I went to college with Drew Shirley (he's in Switchfoot now). We played a ton of music together; he's a great guy.
  • Project 86 - their drummer Joey Marchiano sat in with us a few times and it was like playing with a diesel engine; his groove was heavy and solid
  • Supertones - still remember them taking the stage with the intro of Metallica's Damage Inc, but with brass, awesome
 

Tony

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
6,224
I view early Christ Tomlin and some of the early Passion albums as being more U2ish. Hillsong to me is more Cold Play. But I guess Cold Play got dubbed a bit of a U2 sound. But I have played a ton of Hillsong over the years and don't really remember doing rhythmic dotted 8ths on those songs.

This one comes to mind... or maybe I'm just lazy and didn't want to play the stream of 16ths, that is also possible.

 




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