The more expensive the pedal the brighter the led. Please stop it!

RolandKorg

Member
Messages
4,034
Took two stacked pieces of red electrical tape to tame the LED on mine. Easy fix, but not sure how they put this together and went, "Yeah, that's the right amount of light."
Marketing ploy. It gets/keeps us talking about them. ‘Any publicity is good publicity.’ Is anyone not going to buy a pedal because the light is too bright? Solid risk.
 

Warkli

Member
Messages
573
Couldn’t agree more. Please give us adjustable brightness.
I quoted you but this is general.

Editing LED brightness is an easy job. If you can't do it yourself (like me) go to a random electronic guy and make it done. Thats what I do. It doesn't cost money at all and probably you can get your pedal the next day.

If you are dead lazy to do that, use semi-transparent stickers or something.

Come on. This is not something we bother and grumble.
 

CarlGuitarist

Member
Messages
3,413
I quoted you but this is general.

Editing LED brightness is an easy job. If you can't do it yourself (like me) go to a random electronic guy and make it done. Thats what I do. It doesn't cost money at all and probably you can get your pedal the next day.

If you are dead lazy to do that, use semi-transparent stickers or something.

Come on. This is not something we bother and grumble.
With through hole components it’s fairly easy, not so much with surface mount. And you know what would be the easiest thing of all? If the manufacturer replaced the LED resistor with a small trimpot.
 

shermanator

Member
Messages
283
I've read that LED amplitude is often dictated by function within the circuit; perhaps a "best gig sunglasses <$8k for unruly LEDs: suggestions" thread is in order.
 
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Warkli

Member
Messages
573
With through hole components it’s fairly easy, not so much with surface mount. And you know what would be the easiest thing of all? If the manufacturer replaced the LED resistor with a small trimpot.
Ok, i just quit. I hope you get that option
 

Mattyc

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
333
The worst I’ve seen (before the onset of temporary blindness) is the silver MXR 10-band graphic EQ.

I like the pedal but it gives off an insane amount of light.
One of the other threads mentioned putting a drop of white glue on each of the leds. I tried it and it works great!
 

ClinchFX

Member
Messages
878
With through hole components it’s fairly easy, not so much with surface mount. And you know what would be the easiest thing of all? If the manufacturer replaced the LED resistor with a small trimpot.
As someone who prototypes using SMDs on strip board, I find SMT far easier than through-hole.;)

Early LEDs were dim, and required 20mA, often their maximum rated current, to generate useful light, even as indicators on pedals. Nowadays, high brightness LEDs are easier to obtain and often cheaper than low intensity LEDs. Modern medium and high brightness LEDs require only a few mA to produce more than enough light for a pedal. Unfortunately, there are folks out there in pedal land who still believe that all LEDs must be fed 20mA.

Reducing current by putting a resistor in series with a LED will reduce brightness, but there is a potential problem. When LED current is reduced too far, the LED can become a wideband noise generator - something you really don't need in a pedal.

Using a carbon-track trimpot to adjust brightness seems like a good idea, but carbon trimpots deteriorate when used with DC current and they end up with dead spots.

We have solved the brightness problem by using a light pipe through the front of the enclosure. The LED on the PCB inside the enclosure points at the inside end of the light pipe which diffuses the light while passing it through to the front of the pedal. Light pipes are not new technology - they have been used for many years in many/most consumer items that have LED indicators.

Boss still use low brightness LEDs because they can buy multiple thousands at a time, and that size buy will make them very cheap.

Peter.
 

Guppie

Member
Messages
1,053
Apparently I've touched a nerve.
The point I'm trying to make to pedal manufacturers: brighter is NOT automatically better. Please find a middle ground.
 

CarlGuitarist

Member
Messages
3,413
As someone who prototypes using SMDs on strip board, I find SMT far easier than through-hole.;)

Early LEDs were dim, and required 20mA, often their maximum rated current, to generate useful light, even as indicators on pedals. Nowadays, high brightness LEDs are easier to obtain and often cheaper than low intensity LEDs. Modern medium and high brightness LEDs require only a few mA to produce more than enough light for a pedal. Unfortunately, there are folks out there in pedal land who still believe that all LEDs must be fed 20mA.

Reducing current by putting a resistor in series with a LED will reduce brightness, but there is a potential problem. When LED current is reduced too far, the LED can become a wideband noise generator - something you really don't need in a pedal.

Using a carbon-track trimpot to adjust brightness seems like a good idea, but carbon trimpots deteriorate when used with DC current and they end up with dead spots.

We have solved the brightness problem by using a light pipe through the front of the enclosure. The LED on the PCB inside the enclosure points at the inside end of the light pipe which diffuses the light while passing it through to the front of the pedal. Light pipes are not new technology - they have been used for many years in many/most consumer items that have LED indicators.

Boss still use low brightness LEDs because they can buy multiple thousands at a time, and that size buy will make them very cheap.

Peter.
Informative and interesting, thanks for that! Now please spread your gospel to the other manufacturers:D
 

ClinchFX

Member
Messages
878
Informative and interesting, thanks for that! Now please spread your gospel to the other manufacturers:D
Thank you. I have to admit that, even though I had worked with light pipes for years in my "real jobs", it took me a long time to find suitable light pipes for our pedals. Our older pedals have LEDs that are brighter than necessary.

Another reason for using light pipes is to ensure complete electrical isolation. Last year, I designed a control system for a client who manufactures dry docks for small boats. The control box needed a LED to indicate activity but had to be waterproof and electrically isolated, so I used a light pipe, bonded into the enclosure with a LED on the PCB aimed at it from the inside. It also reduces assembly time.

As for spreading the word, hopefully some other pedal makers will read this thread. I'm happy to share. :)

Peter.
 

stickyFingerz

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,411
The DAM RR-10 is expansive and bright, and there's no way you can see from a standing distance where the knobs are set.

I painted over the plastic LED "lens" with white lacquer and changed the knobs. I'm not selling the pedal so it's all good.
 

Mark Milliron

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
716
My Julia Chorus has two blaring white LED’s! It’s super annoying, even during the day. I do not understand what these companies are thinking when they design these pedals with such bright LED’s.

They make paint markers (a colored sharpie will not work) that you can buy at places like the Hobby Lobby, that you can use to darken the LED on an obnoxious pedal. It’s works well.
 
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TopJimmy5150

Member
Messages
1,472
Yes! My old pedals were fine! All my newer pedals have this ridiculous blinding light...I cannot see the controls.
 

dcburn

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
349
Bought an Eathquaker Depths pedal and the LED will blind you! And I practically blind as it is!!
 




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