The Secretive Family Making Billions From The Opioid Crisis

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by Traintrack, Oct 23, 2017.

  1. m1911

    m1911 Member

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    Me too!

     
  2. m1911

    m1911 Member

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    Yep....
    PS: The star of the show here, Todd Parkinson, died of synthetic marijuana a few years later....That's right....synthetic marijuana...

     
  3. m1911

    m1911 Member

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    And then there's the follow-up story.....more fun....in Bean-town no less....

     
  4. m1911

    m1911 Member

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    And then onto West Virginia.....

     
  5. m1911

    m1911 Member

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    And the latest Netflix adventure from West Virginia....

     
  6. paulbearer

    paulbearer Member

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    Right there with the Opiod Mad Men is the ultra-loosely regulated halfway house industry. 80%+ relapse rate. Counselors are powerless to their administration.
    Yup, supply and demand on those beds... keep em full, we're not here to cure you, we'll house you as long as the check keeps clearing. Like prisons.
     
  7. hellbender

    hellbender Member

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    In a recent development, charges are being to brought to Purdue pharma and the family for their earlier efforts in convincing the world that their product was safe.
     
  8. SuperSilverHaze

    SuperSilverHaze Member

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    of course they are evil. they are at the top of the pharmaceutical game. its not rocket science. the entire organization is ran by greed and profit at the expense of others well being. its literally the way it works.
     
  9. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    They're an alloy of both good and evil. As are most Type A people.

    All these endowments and donations with the string attached where their "brand" is exalted, is a sort of insurance policy for the day when the victims of the product unite in a MeToo framework and come looking for their oppressors, in the same way that women eventually came looking for Weinstein and Cosby.

    I'm wondering if the general public will become suspicious of every benefactor and see a bad motive behind every gift and honorary degree. Will donations be less common in the future, if the populace assumes you're trying to curry favor to offset the crimes of your life or previous life?

    Oxy does have a function, as do most opioids in the treatment of acute pain. Misuse tends to always involve chronic pain or in some instances, little or no pain at all.

    I mention the Sacklers and Weinstein in the same post, for a reason. Each accomplishes both good and evil. When you think about it, the opioid addict who was in fact never injured, and was not in any actual pain, plays as big a role as anyone in preventing these medicines from getting to the other class of people who actually need the product and will use it for what it was intended for. And these addicts have never done anyone a favor, always taking and robbing and never giving back to society in any respect. Certainly we will provide them with the rehabilitation they now need, but they've contributed ZERO to our society and culture and at least the Sacklers and Weinsteins have tried to compensate and repay their society and culture in a blizzard of art and philanthropy. If you're St. Peter and you're deciding who made something of their lives, who do you prefer? The alloy of much good but also some evil, or the base metal of nothing, whose greed was for drugs to get high, and while high, only had plans for how to get high again. Just because I don't care to see drug addicts in jail, doesn't mean I have much respect for them as contributors to the cause of Mankind.

    Something we don't talk about much, is how the majority (by pill count, etc.) of the opioids still go to actual, proper use. And people (measured in numbers of souls) who are prescribed the product use it correctly is an even higher percentage. What that leaves is, the addicts with their much, much higher pill count as they continue to use over months and months, years. Whereas "valid" use of the opioid might be a single dosage or administrations over something like 3 days. Maybe the Addicts are the real Evil here, in the way they so often prevent people who could use one pill, one time for a dislocated knee, but may not get effective pain relief because they or their doctor is scared off.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2018
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  10. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    Another thing:

    These opioids were around out there, for Decades it seemed and the abusing populace found them to some degree but the addiction issue was a relatively small scale thing. Chief of Police here, a dozen teen agers there, coupla housewives, a Dentist, and so forth.

    Now, in the last 5 years or so, the Opioid Epidemic suddenly swept over the country. What changed? Did the drug itself change? Did it become easier to administer? Is it more potent than it was 20 years ago? Did the Sacklers add a new ingredient to make Oxy addictive in a way it never used to be?

    I'd argue that people changed. People's objectives in life change. People's concept of having to beat back foreign powers seemed to have waned. People's sense of having control over a path to a better future changed. People's sense of self worth changed. More and more people with an empty spot where their soul was supposed to be, inhabited this town and that town. People gave up on the Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous and settled for anaesthesia. Now, certainly the drug companies get some of the blame. But IMO more of it lies elsewhere. Call addiction a Disease, but remember, Evolution has always favored the individuals who have the strongest resistance to Disease and those with little or no resistance to disease tend to fall by the wayside.

    The only factors I know of other than a loss of human spirit, I haven't mentioned, are a relative abundance of surplus drugs of all kinds, a lot of unemployed people 2008-2012 who were looking for new ways to make a buck, Information Technology and the internet which brought suppliers and consumers together faster and easier, and frankly, better roads and higher speed limits. But, I would still argue this colossus does not take off if the people have strong, well defined goals in their life. Something that's really hit hard just in the last couple years.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2018
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  11. supersoldier71

    supersoldier71 Member

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    A person suffering from chronic pain would see it differently.
     
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  12. SuperSilverHaze

    SuperSilverHaze Member

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    unless they knew how much advantage they were being taken of on the overall pricing and the correlation between insurance companies and big pharma. drugs are often times NEEDED, but big pharmacy will do anything they can to take advantage of the person in need of the drug. its pretty messed up.
     
  13. rsm

    rsm Member

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    addiction is a real problem. it starts with the user (assuming adult) taking personal responsibility for their actions. IMO

    if you are prescribed a medication by your doctor you need to ask questions, do research, etc., understand the side effects, possible consequences etc. As an adult human being, you have a choice. If you know or show signs of having a tendency / proclivity / probability to addiction, you should discuss with your healthcare provider, one you trust, get second and third opinions, and be sure you're monitored for signs of addiction.

    It seems to me most people are aware of the problem and would be more careful about becoming part of the problem.

    After surgery last year I was prescribed pain meds when I was discharged from the hospital; I filled the prescription but never used them; given a choice, I decided the pain - bearable most of the time - was a better option than the pain meds which could be addictive.

    The real victims are the children and families of these addicts, they have my sympathy and support; as for the adult addicts, they chose poorly.

    YMMV.
     
  14. Bob Maximus

    Bob Maximus Silver Supporting Member

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    me 2
     
  15. bluwoodsman

    bluwoodsman Member

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    Did you make that choice because of a self assessment that you may be prone to addiction? If so, good for you.

    If not, unless you assumed the pain would be tolerable, not always a good idea.

    This is evidence of one of the long understood treatment protocols being turned completely around by the response to the problem.

    That is...The importance of getting ahead of expected pain before it arrives, and the negative impact on how you recover if you don't.

    Standard used to be a short Rx when strong pain is expected. Today it's take a few tylenolol....And people with needs and their recovery times are suffering for it.
     
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  16. rsm

    rsm Member

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    It was more an avoidance of the possibility, once the pain was manageable. The effort was in the hospital as I tried to extend the time between dilaudid doses in the prescribed schedule. I also learned I was able to reduce the amount per dose, which was a useful tool.
     
    Last edited: Jul 10, 2018
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  17. supersoldier71

    supersoldier71 Member

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    No, I suspect that, unlike the addict, the chronic pain sufferer is capable of acting and thinking rationally, and understand what their quality of life would be without opiates/opioids.

    I’m a retired Soldier, and I know way too many retirees that aren’t even 50 and rely on pain meds to get out of bed. They’re pretty sharp dudes, and they understand the implications.

    Painting the entire pharm industry as evil is not at all useful because not only are they not going anywhere, no reasonably well thought argument could justify the suffering that would result if they did magically disappear.

    Is US society, writ large, over medicated? Yeah, probably.

    But that’s largely a self inflicted wound.

    Any solution that doesn’t focus largely on personal responsibility and accountability will result in situations where those who need can’t get and those who want, so whatever it takes to get.
     
  18. SuperSilverHaze

    SuperSilverHaze Member

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    i think we are actually on similar pages. maybe my language wasnt as eloquent and misinterpreted because im certainly not saying the entire pharmy industry is evil. its really just the ones who have more to gain and make decisions to push drugs and encourage over prescribing drugs for their personal benefit at the expense of others.
     
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  19. Chris Scott

    Chris Scott Member

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    More than a bit surprised (and impressed) this thread's not been nuked yet.
     
  20. smiert spionam

    smiert spionam Member

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    What about Purdue’s decision to market the drug as being effective for 12-hour dosing, when their own research and feedback from patients showed that for many, efficacy wore off in 8? Is the fact that this fraudulent marketing created pain spikes and a high likelihood of abuse somehow the fault of irresponsible patients?
     
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