The Shred Cam and right-hand technique

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by potsticker, Apr 20, 2008.

  1. potsticker

    potsticker Member

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    I find this amazing:
    http://www.troygrady.com/code.php

    A "strings-eye" view of high speed picking technique, shot with a guitar-mounted high speed cam, and slowed down so you can see every detail.

    Check out Steve Morse...wait for the end of the video to see the slow-down: http://www.troygrady.com/mov/steve.mov

    Tip: use the cursor in the QuickTime viewer to drag back-and-forth in time during the slow motion parts.... notice the pinky rest on the E string...I think I also see that pick "bounce" technique over the strings that we've mentioned Eric Johnson and others have. I wonder if the pinky-rest on the E string kind of serves as a "springboard" to allow the bouncing motion over the strings..?

    Russ
     
  2. drfrankencopter

    drfrankencopter Member

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    Nice find....

    My guess is that the pinky resting on the high E serves as a mute, and a reference. I know that when I play I tend to hang my pinky on my high E, mostly for muting purposes, but it's so ingrained in my technique that if I don't do it, then I lose my reference for where my pick is.

    I'd love to see this type of footage on scalar runs that span all six strings. In particular I'd like to see if there is a perceivable technique shift when working on the low-E vs the other strings. I have a tough time working on the low E myself, partly due to a lack of an adjacent lower string to reference. I'm also interested in seeing if other players brush the strings with the sides of their thumbs (I do).

    Cheers

    Kris
     
  3. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    Steve's great! His approach/technique, though immense!, is pretty unorthodox. I'd like to see the differences between a couple dozen people who can play in Steve's league. I think that'd really start to bring out the important things they might all have in common, like pick angle, etc.
     
  4. potsticker

    potsticker Member

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    There's a few more free sample clips of great players on the site that I didn't look at yet, Albert Lee, Rusty Cooley, etc. I think you have to buy the DVD to get a good look at everyone they filmed.

    Russ
     
  5. Swain

    Swain Member

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    Yeah, Troy says that there is a common technique from all of these guys. He calls it "Scooping".

    So far, I don't think the DVD is out. But, I keep waiting!



    P.S.
    I also let my Pinky rest on the high E string, a lot of the time.
     
  6. buddastrat

    buddastrat Member

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    I love Steve Morse and he's a monster, but I just never cared for when he does his fast crosspicking with distortion, it sounds so messy like in that clip. But it sounds really good on a cleaner tone. I think it's his weird two fingered picking grip doesn't allow his hand to palm the unwanted string noise out.
     
  7. Noah

    Noah Member

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    The guy also says all of the really fast monster players say they got their chops very quickly without much thought. They didn't sit with a metronome speeding it up little by little for years on end.
     
  8. buddastrat

    buddastrat Member

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    It really is that way. At least for me, watching them do it on their instructional video and the light bulb went on. It was like oh, that's how you do it. It was like the psychological obstacle was gone.

    hours of metronome use did not get me anywhere as far as technique. I was using the wrong techniques and wrong muscles/tendons. Even the wrong placement on the neck. Don't trust those transcription books!

    Practice doesn't make perfect, it makes it (semi)permanent. lol.
     
  9. buddastrat

    buddastrat Member

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    It's cool, but there's very little pick attack. Sounds mostly hammered/pulled legato style with real low action/little dynamics. I know he's picking much of that though but that's how it sounds.
     
  10. Clifford-D

    Clifford-D Member

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    I'm all for dynamics, space, breathing, having notes sing.
    unusual note choices and u-turns.

    But Shawn had an extreem gift for sure.
    And your observations are noted. But,,,,,
    I'm sure he could play it any way you could think of.
     
  11. buddastrat

    buddastrat Member

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    Definitely. on all that other stuff. I just always like the contrast of attack of the pick and then the fluid sound of the left hand techniques.
    If you pick with a real soft attack, might as well just do all hammer and pulls and have that dreamy sound all the time.
     
  12. onestop

    onestop Silver Supporting Member

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    I read about this project a while back and TOTALLY forgot about it! Thanks for the post!!
     
  13. Shredmonster

    Shredmonster Member

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    I think really fast players are naturally fast. I think it has to do with perception and twitch muscles.

    Of course you still have to practice your ass off - no getting around it.

    You should see the people argue and some of the nasty comments I have gotten when I suggest that you don't need a metronome!
     
  14. Tom Gross

    Tom Gross Supporting Member

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    I've been saying that for years, and nobody would listen.

    BTW - I jammed with Steve Morse when we were both in college, and he had all the technique in the world then.
     
  15. SvenHock

    SvenHock Member

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    Agreed. What do the monster players mean by quickly? 6 months, a year or more? You still have to put in time.
     
  16. Noah

    Noah Member

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    I think they meant the time period where the BIG jump in technique and speed came. I used to play stuff from guys like Rhoads, Schenker, and Lynch when I was in high school, but then my playing went to entirely new level when I started getting into players like Al Dimeola, Frank Gambale, Tony MacAlpine, and Vinnie Moore. I remember practicing a lot, but making huge leaps very quickly with my technique and picking ability.

    (disclaimer-of course that was many years ago and I suck now)
     
  17. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    I've seen (and have most likely participated in) those threads! ;)

    For speed, I don't know if the metronome has helped me all that much. For time feel and for being able to feel in control of what I'm playing, however, it's been an indispensable tool for me. That's why I would never dismiss the metronome as a tool for serious practice (for the kinds of players who actually practice).

    I would be curious to know which of these players in this study make regular use of either a metronome or some other type of click track/drum machine.
     
  18. potsticker

    potsticker Member

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    When I was kid, there was a company selling training videos for various sports (golf, tennis, etc) where there was not a spoken word of instruction...the video was just clips of athletes with 'perfect form" just hitting a ball over and over again.

    The idea was if you put in the time watching these (incredibly boring) videos, your eyes, brain and muscles would get imprinted with the movements, and you could learn to execute them automatically.

    So if anyone's looking for me, I'll be watching an endless loop of the slow-motion right hand movements of Albert Lee and Steve Morse.

    Wait.

    I should say "the slow-motion right hand guitar playing movements", shouldn't I?
    :D

    Russ
     

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