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The technique to get the "big room" guitar sound in a small room

ari

Member
Messages
990
I recall reading an article about using a wooden board or something in front of amp speakers, place it at an angle and mic-ing the reflection off of that to simulate the sound of a guitar amp in a big room.

Does anybody know what I'm talking about? Anybody has a link to this article? Thanks!

ari
 

E-Rock

Member
Messages
699
The first rule of recording is... THERE ARE NO RULES!!
sorry... I love saying that :)

Sure, try that! You may end up with some phase problems but it may be just the ticket!
You could try a really tight double tracking, pan hard left and right.
Or maybe a slap-back echo.
Or, put a 57 on the speaker, straight up mono. Then, put another mic (omni maybe) as far back as you can get it, maybe up in the corner.
Then, send the distant mic to a verb, or just delay that mic by 40-100 ms.

Fun stuff. Good luck!!!
 

TAVD

Guitar Player
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
3,707
You can try two sm57s instead of just one.
 

thesedaze

Member
Messages
1,682
ari said:
I recall reading an article about using a wooden board or something in front of amp speakers, place it at an angle and mic-ing the reflection off of that to simulate the sound of a guitar amp in a big room.

Does anybody know what I'm talking about? Anybody has a link to this article? Thanks!

ari
I believe that article was concerning Warren Haynes on the latest mule album.

For miking the cabinets, Haynes says he'll "usually just use two, but occasionally three mics. On the 4-by-12s, I'll have a [Sennheiser] 421 and a [Shure] 57 on each. Then on the Zeta, just a 57. We also started doing something new on this album. We took this sheet of plywood and put it on an adjacent wall in the room and we put a 57 facing the plywood, away from the speaker. That's for the Zeta more than anything - you mike the area where the Zeta sound is hitting the plywood and it gives it a nice quality.

"I have a Bradshaw switching system where I can use up to three amps at a time and blend them together, and I can have my effects going through them or not, depending on how they're programmed. So it makes switching and looking for sounds a lot cooler. When we're setting up from song to song, we'll try something and I'll check it with Michael to see if a combination is better than some of the parts. For the most part, they're all going to different tracks; occasionally, we might commit and blend two onto one track."
http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0HEO/is_11_28/ai_n6220545
 

Rusty G.

Member
Messages
3,143
Just try putting one SM57 on the speaker and then another right by it facing in the other direction. . .like towards the wall. You can track both at the same time and blend the reflected sound into the original close mic'd sound to get the effect you're looking for.

Caveat. . .this works if you're in a small room and you're running a tube amplifier pretty loud. If you're not running hot enough, the mic facing the wall might not get enough sound with a SM57. Also, the further away the wall is from the amp, the longer the delay, thus, you get away from the effect and end up with a different effect. Come to think of it. . .It might be pretty cool. Give it a shot.

Good luck!
 

trisonic

Member
Messages
13,147
If you are able to use some volume direct a Mic facing into the farthest corner of the room away from the amp - quite close into the corner. That was used a lot to record the Brit Blues stuff in the '60's.

Best, Pete.
 

ari

Member
Messages
990
thesedaze said:
I believe that article was concerning Warren Haynes on the latest mule album.



http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0HEO/is_11_28/ai_n6220545
Yes, that's the technique I was talking about, though that's not the article I was thinking about. I just remember reading an article (it was in EQ or MIX or Electronic Musician or something else) that described this idea of putting up a board in front of a speaker in an angle and pointing a mic toward it. It was one of those how-to articles that described more of the details.

Oh well, thanks for the link. At the very least, this confirms that it's a technique worth exploring.

ari
 

chrisgraff

Member
Messages
2,648
Mark Hudson (Aerosmith producer) described to me one of the methods he used to record a particular amp:

"I stretched the cable as far as it would go, and pointed the mic at the noise."

Go figure. :RoCkIn
 

blueclay

Member
Messages
27
I have had some very good success by putting my boogie in a closet full of cloths and coats and putting the mic on the far side of the closet and closing the door--I use a Rodes tube mic and a '57 and crank it keep the attenuation down and fader at unity--bring up attenuation to give max record volume but dont red line--make sure your amp tone sounds good in your headset and adjust to taste====good luck==and play well
 

playon

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,916
Put the first mic on the grill cloth near the edge of the speaker. Put a second mic at the other end of the room from your amp, pointing at the wall. Mix to taste. You could try adding some compression to the distant mic.
 




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