the truth about vinyl

Discussion in 'The Sound Hound Lounge' started by Radar, Sep 9, 2019.

  1. Moby Dick

    Moby Dick Member

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    When I got back into vinyl(I call them records) two years ago,
    I remembered how much I enjoyed the activity of listening to music which I had not really experienced in virtual decades.

    It can be a bit finicky keeping the stylus and grooves free of dust and the pops and crackles can sometimes be distracting but it has been a really enjoyable bit of part nostalgia and part ritual.

    I’m not into records to be an audiophile or for $1000 power chords.
    I love how I pay more attention to the music and am more invested in the experience which forces you to listen to all the tracks and not skip over the lesser-known songs.

    And like all the things I like,
    it just is fun to look at.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. monty

    monty Member

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    Pure gold, lol. Vinyl sounds great IMO, but I cant deal with the above .
     
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  3. TCMx3

    TCMx3 Supporting Member

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    I found a nice-ish record player worth it. Once you get past Linn/Thorens/etc. level I do agree theyre better but the price explodes.

    Best to spend the biggest $$$ on the reusable pieces IMO. Good digital sources through the right amp and speakers is unreal, too.
     
    jeff_lebowski likes this.
  4. jeff_lebowski

    jeff_lebowski Member

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    The truth about vinyl is that it's horrible for the environment.
     
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  5. chrisjw5

    chrisjw5 Member

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    I have a few vinyl albums that I bought in the last few years for the artwork. I don't have a player.

    That said, I think the thing I miss about vinyl, and cassettes (I was born in late '70, so I grew up a cassette kid) is the idea that I'd listen to a piece all the way through. It required patience.

    I've become so OCD about curating the perfect playlist - and skipping cuts is so easy on my digital - that I've slowly lost the ability to slow down.

    Someone mentioned cooking dinner. I've recently, with the turn of the weather in the northeast and the ability to be in the kitchen again, begun playing a whole album while I cook. I do it from my phone through a bluetooth speaker with my phone in the other room so I have to actually listen, instead of anticipating and curating and, essentially, DJing.

    It's nice.

    And I miss the f--- out of good album art.
     
  6. 3waytie4last

    3waytie4last Unfluencer Gold Supporting Member

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    I always thought the joy of vinyl was making your friends haul 20 milk cartons worth when you moved to a new apartment. :p
     
  7. chrisjw5

    chrisjw5 Member

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    Before they move my 800 books.

    One of the best parts about turning 40 was the agreement that my 4 closest friends and I made - next time anyone moves, hire someone. None of us are going to carry anyone's sh!t around anymore. We've all moved each other too many times.
     
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  8. rickt

    rickt Gold Supporting Member

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    True, the scratches and skips don't add to the sonic goodness, but it sure does bring back memories on how those imperfections were etched into the recording. Some are happy, some are sad, but, like a sonic photograph, the moment was captured to be relived again.
     
  9. 3waytie4last

    3waytie4last Unfluencer Gold Supporting Member

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    I haven't done it for a long time, but I've moved countless friends over the years. I never owned much vinyl, I was always the sucker hauling someone else's full milk cartons.
     
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  10. fishlog

    fishlog Supporting Member

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    Man I can tell just by looking at those pictures none of you have kids or they have flown the nest!

    My youngest has broke my needle clean off twice now. The last time it took me over a year before I got it replaced which was just recently.

    That said after almost a year with out playing records it was fun going through what I had again... didn’t realize I had so many duplicates and triplicates... no one ever does that with CDs and obviously digital.
     
    2016aug29 likes this.
  11. teleman1

    teleman1 Supporting Member

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    Here is what gets me. For the most part, you can find good quality vinyl used from 10 -20 bucks, it is a better quality than current pressing these days I have heard. Some in this thread claim they don't like static, pops, clicks. Yet, I see people go to record stores and buy the 3 dollar bin stuff. You would be better off using any other medium than to deal with skips pops, clicking and noisy record ride. Cleaning won't help in most cases. If you want to have maximum listening with albums, stay away from bargain bins for the most part. If they were better, they wouldn't be a bargain. AND PLEASE, don't give exemptions to the rule, I have bought great stuff at garage sales for a buck; good luck waiting for the next deal to appear.
     
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  12. Killcrop

    Killcrop Supporting Member

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    I was never very good at putting the records away. Apple Music is so much better for me.
     
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  13. Bolt VanderHuge

    Bolt VanderHuge Member

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    Do you strike the pose of your avatar when you partake in that? :p
     
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  14. guff

    guff Member

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    Interestingly enough I got into vinyl in the early 00s when it was at rock bottom in terms of popularity, for its sound and value. Thrift store, hand-me-down, salvaged playback equipment sounded better than the consumer receivers and amps of the y2k era and vinyl sounded great through it.

    It was a good way to support underground artists who cared enough to press vinyl, charging $10-12 for a new single lp and a gatefold 2xLP between 14-18. The music industry was trying to get 15-22 for cds, even more for 2xCD albums. Meanwhile it was common for me to show up at a spring yard sale and get $1 (or less) records cherry picked from long-stored collections, and even find the occasional free crate at the curb on trash day.

    The friends who thought me a hipster hopped on the bandwagon years later, but after 2008 it was a wrap for the deals as the economy tanked and vinyl renaissance began to take hold. Now I see prices regularly approaching, even exceeding $30 and have to be real selective about which titles are most flattered by the format. Love it.
     
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  15. scribbler

    scribbler Member

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    I tried to get into it but I prefer to have music on cds, usb drives, computer, etc. Way too many inconveniences with vinyl that just aren’t worth it for me. Ymmv of course.
     
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  16. Alan Dunn

    Alan Dunn Member

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    I had well over 5000 albums - but got rid of them all for a more manageable collection of 1000 Cd's and SACD's.
    No regrets.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2019
  17. chandra

    chandra Member

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    Weather is incredible. Takes things to another level. Hope the live show is equally as awesome.
     
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  18. JK1965

    JK1965 Silver Supporting Member

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    I was born in (see avatar) and it was all about vinyl. We also had 8 track tapes which were awful. They sounded real flat and dull. There were 4 different sections and the tape would switch when one was finished and sometimes a song would be too long and it would stop and you had to wait for it to resume and a lot of times it would pick up at the beginning of the last part you heard, kind of a repeat. Just terrible. Cassettes were a huge improvement over that and were the thing for driving. I had boxes of cassettes in my cars. Vinyl was so much better and it wasn’t close.
    Cd’s were supposed to be far superior with their digital technology and the truth is they never lived up to it. Sound quality of albums has gotten worse and worse over time. There was nothing like having a nice turntable plugged into a good receiver/amp running through a couple 4 way tower speakers. The clarity and separation of all the nuances in the recording was light years better than what we have now. It was like having the band in your living room.
    Technology is great but audio quality took a huge hit as a result. For those who weren’t around in those days, sadly you’ll likely never experience what we did sonically all the time. As always we take it for granted in the moment but looking back, there was nothing and to this day, still nothing better than vinyl on a good vintage system. Even a decent system was far and away better than today’s stuff.
     
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  19. Bobby Brown

    Bobby Brown Member

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    The truth about vinyl is that is nice to have big and colorful covers in your hands.
    The truth is that an analog chain to play your music can express a wider and more precise range of frenquencies than many other cheap and common digital alternatives; but the truth is that less than 1% of the people around the world have simultaneously ears, money and the know-how to appreciate the goodness of the vinyl's analog music; the big records companies know this fact so they don't care about the sound quality of their products (recordings, mixes, masters...) no more...today's music is made and optimized for digital chains and fruition so...unless you have many old good records recorded in the old days, unless you have good and expensive audio systems, unless you have good ears the truth about the vinyl is that nowdays is completely useless...but beautiful...
    Have a nice day
     
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  20. mikebat

    mikebat Member

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    I was working in the record industry at the time of the emergence of the cd and subsequent death of the LP. (cassette too)

    To put a point to it, the quality of the lp's in the last five years dropped off dramatically. I am not certain if they were resurfacing overstock vinyl, or the pressing process changed but the lp's were getting flimsier, noisier, and you could faintly hear other music between song selections or quiet breaks. A personal worse offender, I got a Larry Carlton record and before each track, I could hear the Fine Young Cannibals record faintly in the background, hidden in the hiss.

    Today's new vinyl is of much much higher quality, but....it is a question of romance, not logic. We like "that" eq curve. It is what we grew up on. When we hear it, we know and it brings us back to a time...that is what they are selling you.

    The industry killed the LP because everyone repurchasing their favorites on a new medium was a HUGE boon for the industry. I remember shoppers with a shuffling box at their feet, running the racks, and filling up their boxes. When they came to the register, they stacked up 30-40 cd's, and handed over $600-$800 before tax. This was not rare. The industry got fat and lazy at that point, and they did not have the forethought, nor the reaction to file sharing to save themselves.

    So, was the death of the record selling business karma?
     

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