Theory about what people don't understand about PRS...

Assumer

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
258
So being a lefty I have not picked up an American made PRS. What are the neck sizes comparable to? I do have an SE Custom 24. Other guitars r a Suhr modern satin and PT sig and a Music man axis super sport and older JP model. Do they feel anything like what I currently own?
 

SushiPowPow

Member
Messages
1,012
The fact that Emil Werstler and Dan Weller swear by them is good enough for me to appreciate PRS's.

That said - I wouldn't buy one.
 

RolandKorg

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,850
I think you’re overthinking it. People are dumb. That’s it.

There is/was a similar thing with Leica cameras. Back around the time when the world was going digital but the old school guys were still shooting film, I had a Leica M7. Paid about $1850 for the body, used. People who shot Leicas were the Blues Lawyers of photography. But, at that same time, a medium range digital camera costed more than the Leica film camera. There were 16 year olds roaming the city with a Canon 5D, but no one disparaged them for the cost of their gear. Digital established a new standard for ‘expensive,’ but the dopes who need to make idiotic classifications just didn’t reconcile the numbers vs their prejudices.

With PRS, sure, there can be a reaction to the aesthetic. Some of the tops are gaudy to me. I don’t mind the simplest birds, but dislike the more vividly colored ones or the alternative inlays. But, whatever—that doesn’t represent the entire line. And I don’t find it any more objectionable that green Strat or a clownburst Les Paul or an Ibanez JEM or whatever.
 

SushiPowPow

Member
Messages
1,012
5vvm17.jpg
 

Drewstunes

Member
Messages
202
For me, I just don’t like the look or feel of them. I’ve never seen or played one I would want to own but I’m a Fender / Charvel guy so that’s what excites me.
 

Defendant

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,557
I don't think there's many people on earth that think Paul Reed Smith is anything other than super dedicated to making the best instruments he can. The perception people have of his brand is definitely an unintended consequence of his desire to build great instruments, rather than any personal desire top be THE fancy guitar guy.

It all traces back to the early launch. From the start he provided plain colored instruments with moons.

But clearly the LP-influenced maple top versions with those birds are what really captured attention.

They were a hit with anyone who saw them at his first NAMM show, which was peak day glo Kramer at that time. A Gibson-esque guitar with versatility and killer build quality was a super refreshing concept to anyone who had experience with good pre-70s/80s instruments back then.

I think the only way Paul might have avoided where he ended up in terms of brand perception is by only marketing the plain Jane versions at the start. But would his business have taken off? -the fancy maple topped look was a gap in the market in 1986-7.

Even beyond this, a lot of the rep his brand has garnered in later years is not really due to him. It's not his fault that PRS became the guitar of choice for Nu-metal and Nickleback, or that ordinary buyers would somehow be blind to the plain models existing. But here we are.

Non-owner, by the way. Had a CU22 that sounded great many years ago, though. I think he makes killer guitars, but I also don't love the look.
 
Last edited:

indeedido

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,932
My theory is some people just don't like them. That's why there are multiple manufacturers out there. The real question to ponder is, why do PRS guys beat the rest of us over the head to like what they like? I like other brands but I would never start a thread about why doesn't everyone like what I like?! :horse
 

greySky

Member
Messages
220
Regarding the prs s2 standard, I see that the catalog lists it for $1069, but the cheapest one I can find online costs $1400. What gives? Was there a price hike since the catalog came out? Or maybe I'm google failing.
 

John F

Member
Messages
36
Well, what I do know about PRS is that he's a prick about making left handed guitars available.

Oh, so he’s a pr!ck for not making YOU a left handed guitar. With that kind of response on your part I bet you won’t convince him to do it for you anytime soon. Your options are to choose another brand, make left handed guitars yourself, restring one and play it upside down, or learn to play right handed. Jimi did both of those, didn’t hurt his playing any.

Then there are the left handed SE Custom 24s that he currently sells, you could buy one of those:

I think that maybe you didn’t know as much about him as you professed.
 

Rod

Tone is Paramount
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
24,563
I don't think there's many people on earth that think Paul Reed Smith is anything other than super dedicated to making the best instruments he can.

And from the start he provided plain colored instruments with moons. But clearly the LP-influenced maple top versions with those birds are what really captured attention.

The only way Paul might have avoided where he ended up in terms of brand perception is by only marketing the plain Jane versions at the start.

But would his business have taken off? -the fancy maple topped look was a gap in the market in 1986-7. They were a hit with anyone who saw them at his first NAMM show, which was peak day glo Kramer at that time. A Gibson-esque guitar with versatility and killer build quality was a super refreshing concept to anyone who had experience with good vintage instruments back then.

And a lot of the rep his brand has garnered is not really due to him. It's not his fault that PRS became the guitar of choice for Nu-metal and Nickleback, or that ordinary buyers would somehow be blind to the plain models existing.
Great point. It’s sort of in a way like the bad rap Bill Finnegan got when the used Klon prices went up to $2000-$4000… That’s his fault? He made each one by hand for $265. After 2000 of them he just couldn’t do it anymore…..
Paul Smith is always upping the ante and refining what he’s always done. heh, they’re absolutely fantastic guitars that ain’t a Fender or a Gibson… Both of those companies build $10K to $20K custom guitars with no flack.. PRS does an incredible $10K Private Stock and the “lawyers guitars” statements come out of the woodwork. Makes no sense….
 

Rod

Tone is Paramount
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
24,563
Regarding the prs s2 standard, I see that the catalog lists it for $1069, but the cheapest one I can find online costs $1400. What gives? Was there a price hike since the catalog came out? Or maybe I'm google failing.
Pandemic pricing from dealers? Or maybe Paul had to raise prices because he kept all his workers employed during the pandemic.. and my hat goes off to him for that.. that’s how much he cares for his workers….
If you like other brands, that’s great… lots to chose from these days…
 
Last edited:

Haruki

Senior Member
Messages
1,084
I posted this link before, and I think it is applicable to what the OP posted.


"I said, 'Paul, look, when I started, they used to have the Gibson Junior, they called it the student model.'

"I said, 'Why don't you make student models, man? A lot of people cannot afford - people in junior high school, in high school - they can't afford the guitars that you make for me, so make one for kids who go to junior high school and high school.'

"And he kept looking at me like I was crazy, and so after about literally almost like 20-25 years, he finally listened to me. I'm not exaggerating, I pretty much believe this saved his company, you know, because, the youngsters... Carlos Santana


 

Jon Silberman

10Q Jerry & Dickey
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
44,219
His target market was the average person working an average job, who would religiously scrimp and save to buy one guitar that could cover a lot of bases. And to respect that, Paul made guitars as best as he could, with zero shortcuts. I would imagine in the mid 80's, if you had sacrificed for months to afford one good guitar, Paul would want it to be one of his.

As time went on, PRS would then cater to the crowd that grew up with their one (or two, if you were lucky) Annapolis made instruments. By that time, maybe you had some more disposable cash and could afford a higher end example. However, my real love for PRS is with those early Annapolis short heel/sweet switch guitars. These are the ones PRS staked his reputation on in the beginning, for players whose money was precious and limited, so these guitars had to count.
You've described me to a T.

I bought my one PRS that I still own new in 1986. I had started my first real job in '83 and saved up $50 or so dollars a month for 2 years before walking into Chuck Levins Music (now the Washington Music Center) looking to buy a Les Paul. Then I played the PRSi and that was the end of a Les Paul for me and the beginning of my owning my PRS.

To this day, I admit, I'm proud that I knew what it was I held in my hands that fateful '86 day. See, at the time, neither I, nor any of my musician friends, had even heard of PRS, much less played one. The $$ I spent on mine was for me, in '86, a carefully saved small fortune. It was a leap of faith to spend it all on a new brand of guitar no one knew anything about then ... but not a super difficult leap: the guitar basically sold itself.
 

Mike Duncan

Staff member
Messages
7,877
04E8EDED-7AD0-4C0F-BBC3-F5F7DB6671FD.jpeg

Of all the guitars I own, or have owned, these two are my “Number Ones”.

I’ve had the Strat since August 8,1994 and the DGT since June 9, 2008.

I’ve played them heavily - the DGT has already been refretted.

If I had to pick only one to be my only electric…the Stratocaster would be it.

The Strat just feels like home.
 




Trending Topics

Top Bottom