There are dreadful albums in all genres, what dreadful BLUES albums are there ?

Telejester

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Gary Moore was a beast with 61 fiesta red strat screaming through marshall amps, especially 1983 - 1985. His later blues phase did nothing for me at all. For the thread purposes I say his 1990 release Still got the blues is pretty grim stuff.
All subjective, which blues albums do you say ain't great and why ?
 

Telejester

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Way too many blues albums are just a guitarist showing off their licks over three chord progressions. Pretty boring.
There is that element for sure. On some a player bares his soul, Jeff Healey 1988 release See the Light is such a recording. There are some well known blues players whose albums I've never made it through, but I am keen to read input from other players and their opinions.
 

Tone_Terrific

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If one imposes strict guidelines and special personal criteria as to what constitutes a 'blues' album one is likely to throw away some very fine listening in order to preserve the snooty requirements for membership to the 'blues' club.
This falls far into the YMMV category of subjective expectations and categorical listening.
Much like saying: too metal, too rock, too pop, too disco, too fast, too slow, too jazzy, etc., for me.
 

Jerrod

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Gary Moore was a beast with 61 fiesta red strat screaming through marshall amps, especially 1983 - 1985. His later blues phase did nothing for me at all. For the thread purposes I say his 1990 release Still got the blues is pretty grim stuff.
All subjective, which blues albums do you say ain't great and why ?

Hot take is hot. Nice troll.
 

wraub

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Blues is supposed to be messy and dirty and sad and maybe gross and also sad- It's the blues.

It doesn't have to be pretty, or commercial, or, really, even good. Being good can make it listenable, but even if it's not it's still the blues.


Some do it better than others.
 

ripgtr

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Not sure if you would really consider the Yardbirds a blues band exactly, but they kind of were. I got a live album of theirs, it is was really bad. I listened to one side and put it away never again to see the light of day.

BB King Easy Listening Blues, with all the sappy strings, at least I listened to it the whole way through, but I don't think I ever got it out again.
 

GulfportBound

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Not sure if you would really consider the Yardbirds a blues band exactly, but they kind of were. I got a live album of theirs, it is was really bad. I listened to one side and put it away never again to see the light of day.
They started as a blues group. If you're thinking of Five Live Yardbirds (their first LP), the performances were good but the recording was terrible. If you're thinking of Live Yardbirds Featuring Jimmy Page, keep in mind there were reasons Page so often took legal action to prevent its releases, mostly due to the recording and how weak it sounded despite a few solid performances (most notably "You're a Better Man Than I/Heart Full of Soul" and "I'm a Man").
BB King Easy Listening Blues, with all the sappy strings, at least I listened to it the whole way through, but I don't think I ever got it out again.
Not one of his greatest efforts. It was from sessions he did for the Bihari Brothers' Modern/Kent/Crown labels, when they insisted he leave them a stockpile of material before he moved to ABC in 1962. It's not unreasonable to suggest his heart probably wasn't all the way in it.
 

ripgtr

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They started as a blues group. If you're thinking of Five Live Yardbirds (their first LP), the performances were good but the recording was terrible. If you're thinking of Live Yardbirds Featuring Jimmy Page, keep in mind there were reasons Page so often took legal action to prevent its releases, mostly due to the recording and how weak it sounded despite a few solid performances (most notably "You're a Better Man Than I/Heart Full of Soul" and "I'm a Man").

Not one of his greatest efforts. It was from sessions he did for the Bihari Brothers' Modern/Kent/Crown labels, when they insisted he leave them a stockpile of material before he moved to ABC in 1962. It's not unreasonable to suggest his heart probably wasn't all the way in it.
I think the Yardbirds might have been the latter. It wasn't the recording, it was the songs. I don't remember hearing anything on it I'd listen to again, but I got it in the early 70s, so who knows what I'd think of it now. Not sure I'm interested in finding out though, lol.

The BB - I had a bunch of those Kent albums. Got them as cheap cutouts for 99 cents back in the early 70s. I left them when I moved to CA, my brothers raided them so they are still around in the family somewhere. I need to see if I can get some of them back. Most of them had good stuff mixed with some filler. The Easy Listening wasn't bad, so much as boring.
 

GulfportBound

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I think the Yardbirds might have been the latter. It wasn't the recording, it was the songs. I don't remember hearing anything on it I'd listen to again, but I got it in the early 70s, so who knows what I'd think of it now. Not sure I'm interested in finding out though, lol.
I had a copy circa 1976 when it got its first reissue on a Columbia budget label. The set kicked off with a short take of "The Train Kept a-Rollin'," then the "Mr./Heart" extended medley. Then, a take on the future "Dazed and Confused" (then called "I'm Confused") and not a great one, though not a complete loss---and it did give an indication of Page's future if not the Yardbirds'. Then, as much as I knew the Yardbirds' blues roots and love of vintage soul music, whatever possessed them to cover Garnet Mimms's "My Baby" escaped me then and still does---it really wasn't a song that suited them. That was side one.

Side two: "Over Under Sideways Down" was the side-opener and not exactly one of the better takes you'd hear. That was followed by a hit on "Drinkin' Muddy Water" (from the Little Games LP) and it wasn't terrible, either. "Shapes of Things" came after that and again, not a total horror but you knew the group could have done it better. Page took the floor to himself playing "White Summer," and given the circumstances (namely, the band's rhythm section of Chris Dreja and Jim McCarty just didn't fit the piece) it could have been worse. The side closer was "I'm a Man," on which Page went as deep as he could showing more of what would come with the early Led Zeppelin.

My best guess: Aside from the sound issues I noted earlier, the band itself wasn't exactly cohesive anymore. They chafed when producer Mickie Most shoved them as hard as he could toward a return to commerciality on Little Games (though that album has a few jewels, especially "White Summer," "Drinkin' Muddy Water," and "Glimpses"); and, they really weren't the same once Chris Dreja switched from rhythm guitar to bass following Paul Samwell-Smith's exit and the parallel loss of Jeff Beck. (It's fair to say that Dreja as a bassist became their Noel Redding, the guitarist-as-bassist and weakest link.) Plus, singer Keith Relf and drummer McCarty found themselves thinking ahead---to a more completely experimental band they wanted to form after the Yardbirds played out their final tour, a hybrid of folk, rock, classical, and other musics they called Renaissance.
 




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