• The Gear Page Apparel & Merch Shop is Open!

    Based on member demand, The Gear Page is pleased to announce that our Apparel Merch Shop is now open. The shop’s link is in the blue Navigation bar (on the right side), “Shop,” with t-shirts, hats, neck buffs, and stickers to start. Here’s the direct link: www.thegearpageshop.com

    You’ll find exclusive high-quality apparel and merchandise; all items are ethical, sustainably produced, and we will be continuously sourcing and adding new choices. 

    We can ship internationally. All shipping is at cost.


There should be more neck through guitars

Mr. Mukuzi O

Member
Messages
528
I love my neck through ESP when its plugged in, distorted and loud but acoustically unplugged it sounds awful.
 

e???

Member
Messages
2,963
I've never played one. Is it like the qualities of a set neck enhanced as opposed to bolt on? More power n sustain kinda thing?
 

Jo-Jo Beans

Member
Messages
769
More sustain, also you can get the neck heel really really flat since you don't have to bolt-on or use tenon joints.
 

Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
33,498
The neck heel can be really slick.
Some boltons are fairly non-intrusive, too.
Some folks don't care.
I'm not convinced on any other benefits. i.e. more sustain, better (possibly worse!) tone.
However, in the right application they do work well.
 

sleep

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,137
I've never played one. Is it like the qualities of a set neck enhanced as opposed to bolt on? More power n sustain kinda thing?
All of the following is my subjective experience and opinion; none of it is fact.

Neck through guitars tend to use maple as the main truss to which everything else is glued; the reason for that, I assume, is that maple is less likely to warp than a softer wood (like mahogany), and a warped neck is a ruined guitar. If it's not maple or other similarly hard wood, they usually use some sort of stiff stringer like the Gibson Firebird did (walnut) or carbon fiber.

I don't want to argue the sound of wood, but I do think that a stiffer material results in a guitar with fewer overtones (in other words, an enhanced fundamental). The reason, for that, I think, is due to the elasticity of the material (a harder wood, being more stiff, will return to its non-vibrating state more quickly than a softer wood, and is more likely to resonate at one specific frequency). Check the speed of sound in various materials and you'll find that its most efficient transfer is in the least elastic materials. I have found that neck through guitars where the neck through portion is solid maple tend to have greater string to string separation at the expense of overtones. That is subjective and I could easily be proven wrong, I'm sure, but it is my experience so far and helps to explain why many neck through players are either playing the amp (extreme metal) or using a lot of effects/active electronics, where something other than the guitar's natural sound is desirable.

Here's an article about the myth of sustain vs. construction:

http://www.cycfi.com/2013/11/sustain-myth-science/

Here is an absrtact about the same guitar being built using neck through, bolt on, and glue in construction (they cut the same guitar up for all each test and used a "uniform picking machine":

http://liutaiomottola.com/research/sustain.htm

In that test, bolt on offered the best sustain.
 

Tone_Terrific

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
33,498
^ I'll agree that LP's have more sustain in the upper regions, but also, subjectively, in lower notes because they, in effect, compress their attack and level off the useful area of the ADSR curve. The lesser plink is noticeable if you switch instruments into your rig.
With enough drive/Od/compression it all levels out but clean the character can be heard and is not reflected, directly, by the plots.
Yep, it is subjective.
 

klatuu

Member
Messages
2,449
The New Orleans voodoo in my avatar is a neck through design, but Vincent used a 5 piece laminated billet of mahogany, flame maple, mahogany, flame maple and mahogany again. He uses other woods as well, like black limba, but the construction is the same. I think what he's after is stability with this design, and I've had mine since new in 2006 and it's never needed an adjustment to the neck or bridge. He has a spine carved on the back of the headstock to counter the mass loss for the truss rod routing, that adds strength and stability to the headstock as well.
As far as tone is concerned, it excels when played clean; very fat and warm. The fretboard is coco bolo which I find to offer a nice warm tone. I had a voodoo with the same wood construction with an ebony board and while I loved the feel of the ebony, it was a touch bright for my tastes.
One nice touch on this guitar is that it has no plastic parts. The binding is 3 piece flame maple, the pickup rings are flame maple, and even the knobs are hand carved maple. The cavity cover is mahogany and painted along with the back of the guitar in a cherryburst. Come to think of it the truss rod cover is coco bolo too.
 

geek-mo

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
9,745
"There should be more neck through guitars"

Negative. There should be as many neck through guitars as demand for neck through guitars requires and not a neck through guitar more.

:waiting
 

supergenius365

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
10,869
Check out Jack Dent Custom Guitars. His necks are one solid piece of mahogany that sit in a "pita pocket" of mahogany and maple. The resonance is amazing
 

monwobobbo

Member
Messages
6,250
gott say i love my BC Rich Eagle. definitely sustains no problem. i use it in place of a Les Paul as it seems to have very similar sonic qualites.
 

muzishun

Member
Messages
6,482
Those are nice, but I like bolt-on necks even more.

But not aesthetically, set and neck thrus are more of a work of art.

Not that important to me.
 

old goat

Member
Messages
1,987
Neck through guitars tend to use maple as the main truss to which everything else is glued; the reason for that, I assume, is that maple is less likely to warp than a softer wood (like mahogany), and a warped neck is a ruined guitar. If it's not maple or other similarly hard wood, they usually use some sort of stiff stringer like the Gibson Firebird did (walnut) or carbon fiber.
While maple is harder than mahogany, it is also less stable. Wood stability is predicted by comparing the radial and flatsawn coefficients of expansion with moisture. The more similar the two numbers the less likely the wood is to warp with time. Mahogany is one of the most stable woods.

I would think that getting the neck angle right would be harder with a neck through design. Neck angle can be easily adjusted during assembly with bolt on and set neck guitars and even afterwards, although not so easily except for bolt ons. Can someone who has built or worked on neck-throughs tell me how you would adjust neck angle?
 

sleep

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,137
While maple is harder than mahogany, it is also less stable. Wood stability is predicted by comparing the radial and flatsawn coefficients of expansion with moisture. The more similar the two numbers the less likely the wood is to warp with time. Mahogany is one of the most stable woods.

I would think that getting the neck angle right would be harder with a neck through design. Neck angle can be easily adjusted during assembly with bolt on and set neck guitars and even afterwards, although not so easily except for bolt ons. Can someone who has built or worked on neck-throughs tell me how you would adjust neck angle?
I think there's a difference between dimensional stability (expansion) and strength. Aluminum has a higher coefficient of expansion than wood, but I think in terms of strain resistance, aluminum is stronger.

I.e. there's a difference between strength and dimensional stability; there must be a reason why maple is almost always the wood of choice for neck through guitars. Your thoughts?
 

milli vanilli

Member
Messages
4,947
I have both, and you can't beat a the neck through for upper fret comfort...even beats a set neck IMO. Although Ibanez comes close with their recessed bolt ons, man oh man are neck through's smoooooth....
 

xjojox

Tardis-dwelling wanker
Messages
5,739
I've owned a few, and I've found the enhanced fundamental/fewer overtones sonic footprint to be true regardless of center wood type. I do love the heel and the way they feel, and I do like the string to string clarity. But I think they suffer from "PRS Syndrome": they don't sound like a strat, a tele, or a LP so to many folks they just don't sound "right" or organic.

I don't mind outside the box tones so I have had fun with them and a BC Rich Eagle was my main axe for some years. It was quite warm and organic. Besides, Jerry Garcia and Carlos Santana sounded pretty organic with neck-thru guitars to me...

Haven't had one in awhile but I wouldn't mind getting my Eagle back someday.
 

old goat

Member
Messages
1,987
I think there's a difference between dimensional stability (expansion) and strength. Aluminum has a higher coefficient of expansion than wood, but I think in terms of strain resistance, aluminum is stronger.

I.e. there's a difference between strength and dimensional stability; there must be a reason why maple is almost always the wood of choice for neck through guitars. Your thoughts?
Cheaper than mahogany? (Fender maple, Gibson mahogany, etc etc.) Color contrast with dark wings in some cases?
As far as stability vs strength--I thought we were talking about stability. Necks warp because of internal stresses, not because of the pull of the strings. Both mahogany and maple are plenty strong enough for necks. (And besides, that's stiffness, not strength) Mahogany is the most common neck material for acoustics and they are under a lot more stress than electrics.
 




Trending Topics

Top