Thinking about a Quilter amp

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by joegrant413, Apr 15, 2015.

  1. joegrant413

    joegrant413 Member

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    Hello,

    I'm thinking about making some gear changes, and maybe getting a Quilter amp. I've played electric guitar for years, and currently play it primarily at home.

    My gear includes:
    - QSC K12 powered monitor
    - Keeley OD pedals
    - Digitech RP1000 MFX pedal
    - MacBook rig for headphone practice in bedroom
    - bass gear

    Also... I sold a Fender DRRI months ago to finance the Music Man guitar. I loved the Fender clean, but wanted MM guitar more.

    So this weekend I just became familiar with Quilter and the products. I'm interested, and would primarily use it just jam with my son or generally play a bit loud in the basement. Maybe play out again someday at church or at friend's homes.

    One reason I'm interested is that I have long recognized tube amps + analog pedals as just the best you can do in feel and tone, but viewed MFX floorboards as the more convenient and practical setup. Most of my online buds would say AxeFx and 11R rigs are the best you can do if you got the budget.

    To financially swing it, I'd probably sell some gear, the QSC K12 being the most likely to go.

    If anyone here has a Quilter....which Quilter gear do you think I should focus on?

    Thanks,
    - Joe
     
  2. huutevar

    huutevar Member

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    The only Quilter I have played is the MicroPro Mach 2 with the 12" speaker that I got earlier this year, so I can't directly compare it to any others, but I use mine in the same capacity that you are using in your setup and I think it works well for that. I guess I would recommend the MicroPro over the Aviator just because I like the "Lead", "Surf", and "Tweed" voicings on the MicroPro and the Aviator just uses the equivalent of the MicroPro's "Full" voicing, which I'm not as keen on.

    Also, the 12" version is bassy. There are a lot of knobs on it, and it took me a while to figure out how to get the sounds I was looking for, but I settled on bass off, mids at noon, and treble maxed. I'm guessing it's because the amp is really meant for the 8" speaker. So I would probably recommend giving the 8" speaker version a shot, although having never tried one I can't say for sure what the differences are, soundwise.
     
  3. joegrant413

    joegrant413 Member

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    huutevar,

    Thanks much for the reply!

    The Mach 2 does seem pretty attractive. Could I do without my QSC K12 if I got it? The main reason for the K12 has been to support the idea that a really good MFX + great FRFR would be my best rig. (Have occasionally thought about getting 11R or AxeFx.)

    I've also thought about getting a Tone Block and running its DI to the QSC K12. But the Mach 2 seems simpler.

    Cheers,
    - Joe
     
  4. Multicellular

    Multicellular Supporting Member

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    The full freq in on the Aviator (and the Micropro as far as I know - only have an aviator) is not really frfr. I would characterize it more as a generic instrument input. You dont have the same highs as a PA. Which is good for guitar, acoustic guitar, a lot of synth. I actually have a drri too. For comparison, the aviator is even cleaner. Big diff is it stays cleaner for most of the dial.

    If you ran a Mfx w amp models into it I would turn off the speaker sim.
     
  5. joegrant413

    joegrant413 Member

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    Thanks. Maybe I wouldn't need my RP1000 either, and get an M9 for effects
     
  6. stratzrus

    stratzrus Philadelphia Jazz, Funk, and R&B Supporting Member

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    I have a MicroPro 200-8 and I think it would be a great amp for your needs. I have some nice amps (see signature) but these days I'm playing through the Quilter more than any of the others.
     
  7. huutevar

    huutevar Member

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    I tried the MicroPro with an RP360 in the return of the effects loop with a "dummy" 1/4" plug in the send jack and it sounded pretty good with the cabinet in the 360 off, but went back to going straight in to the MicroPro and using the 360 only for effects. You'd have to try it out yourself to see which you like better.
     
  8. mwhy

    mwhy Supporting Member

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    I liked the Aviator -- I don't need the "bells and whistles" on the MicroPro.
     
  9. slackandsteel

    slackandsteel Member

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    I've got a DRRI and an Aviator 8. Haven't touched the DRRI since I got the Aviator, but I haven't played it on a gig. Ton of bass. I use Channel 2, set Gain at about 11 o'clock, bass and mid at about 11 or less, and treble at noon gets me into Fender territory. Not a fan of the reverb so I use a Flint or Topanga. Guitars are 335, Strat, Tele and lap steels. Also works well with piezo equipped instruments.
     
  10. Fred Smith

    Fred Smith Member

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    I have the original version of the Micropro 200 with the 8-inch speaker. You may want to call Chris Parks, the president of Quilter, and ask him about plugging a modeler into the effects return. I did and it blew up the amp. (It was 100% operator error.)

    At Chris' recommendation, I now plug into the "Hi Inst" input and haven't had any problems.

    The 8-inch speaker doesn't have the bass response of a 12-inch speaker, but in a live band setting, I don't miss it. If you need a fuller sound, get a model with the 10-inch or 12-inch speaker.

    A friend of mine bought an Aviator with two 10-inch speakers to replace his original 1965 Fender Twin and he loves it.

    Here are the most important things about Quilter Labs:

    1. First-class customer service. Chris Parks is a great guy.
    2. First-class, forward-thinking designs.
    3. Great sound and a great platform for stompboxes.

    Just my $0.02.
     
  11. omahaaudio

    omahaaudio Senior Member

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    I'm very happy with the sound of my Quilter Tone Block 200.
    200 watts, 4.5 pounds, takes pedals very well, sounds very nice with no pedals at all.
    I use it with a 1 x 12 cab.
     
  12. joegrant413

    joegrant413 Member

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    Still reading... replies all been appreciated!
    - Joe
     
  13. Kyle Ashley

    Kyle Ashley Supporting Member

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    I have an Aviator 8. Sounded a bit small and boxy for my needs so I purchased a head-shell and turned mine into a head to utilize some of my good 1x12 boxes. They can get really loud, and do a really good job with pedals.

    That said, I only carry it as an easy backup for live gigging, as my Bogner Barcelona is just sweeter and more soulful.

    I found the Quilter to still maintain a bit of SS feel, especially on the drive channel with the gain up. I'm keen to try the new Roland Blues Cubes. Still lightweight and SS, but I've heard some pretty convincing tones from them in a couple of videos.
     
  14. Nonvintage

    Nonvintage Member

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    I have an Aviator 12. It sounds very close to my Hotrodded SF Princeton Reverb amp. I probably should have gotten the 8 though because the amps I have sound and weigh about the same. The closed back 8 weighs a lot less. I don't have any cabs so a combo is the direction I took.
     
  15. DecoWaves

    DecoWaves Member

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    I recently purchased a MicroPro 200-8 --- used, in like new condition --- for a great price and I love it!

    - It sounds great just by itself -- you can dial in a lot of good tones.
    - Plenty Loud --> Good for practice --> jamming in house --> small-to-medium gigs
    - Has the Mic input which sounds great (one stop shop for solo performances)
    - Light
    - Works perfectly well with my Pedal Board and they sound great.

    Just to note, I also have a Fender Super Champ X2 (tube) and I do notice there is a difference in response from my Gain Changer and Iron Bell .. but I stress the word DIFFERENCE (meaning, not better or worse than the X2). The Quilter has its own personality.

    I would say that the Clean to Light-Break up is where this Amp (without Pedals) shines. This then serves as a great platform for my Pedal setup to add to if I so choose or need. I was just playing it 10 minutes ago and it just brought a smile to my face.
     
  16. Lothar34

    Lothar34 Supporting Member

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    I dipped my toes into the Quilter world w/ a Tone Block a few months ago. Liked
    it so well that I upgraded to a MP Mach 2 head recently. The Tone Block delivered as advertised, but the MP has completely blown me away.
     
  17. monkmiles

    monkmiles Supporting Member

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    I got a Tone Block a couple months ago. I like it. I don't love it. Yet at least, because I haven't used it lots yet, just at home a few times and at a couple band rehearsals. I need more time to give a strong opinion on it. But right now, a Fender type tube amp is more lively in my mind. But it does have loads of clean headroom which is great.
     
  18. 59Bassman

    59Bassman Plank Cranker Silver Supporting Member

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    I've messed with a MicroPro Mach 2 (the 10", I think) a number of times at a local shop. I've been able to get a couple of good tones out of it, but it takes some work. The amps have a lot of flexibility, but there is something about the way that the controls are laid out that make them very difficult (at least for me) to work with. The overall voice of the base tone is selected in the lower right - however the gain is upper left, next to the "Boost" controls which also look like they control the overall tone of the amp - they do, but kinda. Master volume for one channel is upper right, the volume for the other channel is lower left. There is a tone section with three controls, but then another "Hi Cut" that's located to the far right, several knobs away from the tone section. There's a "Limiter" that apparently reduces the overdrive, but that's located a long way away from the gain or boost controls.

    I've gone so far as to read the manual before I went back to the shop and I still struggled with it. My take is that it's got a lot of flexibility to control your tone, but doing so allows you to have a lot of BAD sounds in there with the good. There are good tones to be had, but this is a bit more investment in digging them out, similar to sitting down with a Mesa Mark series. Compare the control layout with say a Tech21 Trademark 30 and you can see that the Trademark is going to be more friendly to most guitar players.

    Also, they are priced similarly to a good tube amp - that's a hard value proposition for most shops to pitch. If I'm looking for a backup amp, am I going to spend $900 - $1000 on a solid state amp that's harder to dial in, or $100 more for a DRRI that is much more plug-n-play, plus has the tube mystique?
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2015
  19. joegrant413

    joegrant413 Member

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    Good question.... especially since I had a DRRI for years.

    I'm planning to go check out the Mach 2 at a store today.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  20. huutevar

    huutevar Member

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    The thing that stopped me from this is the Quilter can stay clean at higher volumes or can get dirty at lower volumes than a DRRI, so my comparison was Quilter vs having a Princeton, DRRI and a Twin. The Quilter is a light 100 watt amp with 100 watts of headroom on top of that with an effective master volume and extensive tone shaping and voicing options. The DRRI will have better reverb, will look better, and will be a little more trebly (I'm comparing to the 12" MicroPro Mach 2).

    I agree that the MicroPro can take some effort to dial in and I'm still working through all the sounds it is capable of, some of which I don't like, and some of which are really good.
     

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