Thinnest strat neck profile

AdmiralB

Member
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3,060
Shape and size are two different things. If you took three necks, one each of those profiles, and arbitrarily said "make them 0.930 at the 12th fret", then the C would feel the largest, due to the larger shoulders...and the V the smallest. Even though they're all the same depth. A "U" would be biggest of all.

Gibson R9 necks feel smaller than the R-less-than-9 (i.e. R8, R7, R4, et al), but they're not any less-deep - they just have smaller shoulders.
 

3 Mile Stone

Silver Supporting Member
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5,996
The Fender Modern C is pretty thin and very common. About 0.80 at fret 1. For some perspectives on depth and shape and comparisons between them, look at the Warmoth sight. "Wizard" or Ibanez is <.80 and that is pretty thin. I think you will not commonly find anything Fender that thin. Their regular modern C is pretty darn thin by today's standard IMO.
 

71strat

Member
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10,337
The Bonnie Raitte Sig Strat from late 90s-early 2000's has a 1.577 nut width, and a 83-86 thickness x C shape.

My 71 x 4 bolt Strat neck has the same dimensions.

I also have an Early 82 x 62 Fullerton Reissue.

They are around .80-.83 x Modern C but have a 1 11/16 nut width. So they are as wide as a Gibson. But thin. Real Thin.
 

Slaphappy

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5,068
So I'm I hearing a slim "V" type neck would provide someone with small hands the best access to the fingerboard......if choices (think custom build) are available?
 

dewey decibel

…no, but I play one on TGP
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11,497
So I'm I hearing a slim "V" type neck would provide someone with small hands the best access to the fingerboard......if choices (think custom build) are available?

I would think you'd want a "C" over a "V", but then again if it really is that slim I guess it's all be the same. The Warmoth standard thin is a good example.


Me too...almost like an Ibanez neck.

I thought it would help me change my technique and use a lighter touch, but I was wrong. Killer guitar that I knew would be worth good money not to long from then, but my hand cramped so quick on it I just couldn't play it much.
 

ultradust

Member
Messages
1,587
The neck on my "Jimi" CIJ ST68TX is absolutely tiny, a very slim C shape that has been consistently noted by ST68-TX owners over on Strat Talk.

I honestly haven't played any Strat reissues with a neck this small...Mind you I have tiny girl hands that aren't any bigger than my wife's, and find the ST68-TX really easy playing. The maple cap is an extra plus for strength's sake, and is by far the stablest guitar I'ver ever owned to date...almost silly to think how it has never needed a setup since buying it while in Japan in 2008.

It's actually in the Moollon shop now for some neck profile modeling, as we occasionally get certain specific requests based on an era of production and Boss needed to do some hand shaping on a new pair of necks. I wish I had a better image of the back, but on a related note, the slim neck profile makes the 40mm nut feel even smaller.






You can actually see how thin the neck is if you freeze the clip at around 3:30 on this guy's video:

 

toddincharlotte

Silver Supporting Member
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1,875
I played a Classic 50s Strat at Guitar Center last weekend I absolutely loved. 7.5" radius, .8 at first fret, .87 at 12th. Really nice feel.
I have to disagree on the American Standard Modern C neck. Feels big to me, not sure if it's the shoulder, the radius or the thickness but feels a lot bigger to me than that Classic 50s I played.
 

blind radish

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
833
Squire ProTone series .... This IS the thinnest neck across ALL the fenders I have played and owned.

Great deal for the money if you find one used ... but play it first ... not everyone's cup of neck tea
 

AdmiralB

Member
Messages
3,060
Squire ProTone series .... This IS the thinnest neck across ALL the fenders I have played and owned.

He's not asking for the thinnest neck. He's asking for the thinnest shape.

I would think you'd want a "C" over a "V"

If you define a fixed depth, then a V will be the thinnest shape, because it will have the least amount of shoulder material (smallest perimeter, technically speaking).
 

blind radish

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
833
He's not asking for the thinnest neck. He's asking for the thinnest shape.



If you define a fixed depth, then a V will be the thinnest shape, because it will have the least amount of shoulder material (smallest perimeter, technically speaking).


Ah ... of course ... so I mod my post to include: ProTone is the thinnest C shape
 

TCMx3

Member
Messages
2,504
I had an early (still made in Fullerton) '62 RI that had a really slim neck.

yeah those were really thin.

somewhat ironically the two 62s I've played had the biggest necks on a C shape strat I've ever played. provenance of those two was well established.
 




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