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This is how Cornford PTP wiring looks under the skin

Rock Fella

Member
Messages
2,567
This is how the Hellcat looks from within


everything bolted to the chassis and it all looks good to me , i had a look under the skin of my old DSL50 and oh dear what a mess :( , didnt know if it was an amp or a computer i was looking at:confused:

just thought some might be interested in a look at the excellence that truly is Cornford :dude :dude :dude

YOU ROCK CORNFORD !!!!!!

jimmy
 

Matt Gordon

Senior Member
Messages
947
PCB based amps like the DSL's are for all intents, beyond the average users' ability to service if that ever becomes necessary IMHO, outside a simple tube replacement and bias. Anythime you have to lift something off those PCB's, things become iffy at best. Even with a huge dollar desoldering station, once you lift those pads, its all over. IMO, it is best just to replace the complete PCB. These amp makers should be able to supply replacement PCB's at reasonable costs (provided the owner has registered his/her amp with the warranty card/serial #) and thereby negating a lot of the problems with computer-based amps! :D
 

John Phillips

Member
Messages
13,038
It does look nicely made, but why does it have to be so big? You could get that lot into about a quarter of the chassis space.

Not trying to be negative, just puzzled...

(Although, for me, unnecessary size is always a negative, I have to say.)
 

LSchefman

Member
Messages
13,432
>>Although, for me, unnecessary size is always a negative, I have to say.<<

Oh. man, here is a great opportunity for some really lame jokes. Such as:

"Gee, that's not what your girlfriend/wife says."

I could think of more. But you get the idea. ;)
 

doctord02

Member
Messages
1,061
Originally posted by John Phillips
It does look nicely made, but why does it have to be so big? You could get that lot into about a quarter of the chassis space.

Not trying to be negative, just puzzled...

(Although, for me, unnecessary size is always a negative, I have to say.)
Looks to me that when you factor the spacing of transformers, caps and tubes on the other side of the chassis, it makes perfect sense...
 

John Phillips

Member
Messages
13,038
Only if you space them out. You could easily get everything much closer together... Mesa could fit a 100W, four-channel, tube rectified, switchable power-stage amp with Graphic EQ and reverb into that size of box ;).

Just wondering. I wouldn't rule out that the greater spacing is intentional, and limits crosstalk between components, and so improves the tone.

I just hate carrying around more wood and metal than I need to when it holds nothing more than empty space. I wonder if it's more of an image thing... :confused:

I've always loved tiny, compact, powerful amps. I have no desire at all for a 'big amp' image on stage, when a small one will do the same job. Size doesn't matter, it's what you do with it that counts ;).
 

big hair

Member
Messages
284
Naw, little amps look odd, esp when sat ontop of 4x12s - kind of like a big person with a small head :)

BTW - what is written on the chassis in the pic??
 

Rock Fella

Member
Messages
2,567
Originally posted by John Phillips
Mesa could fit a 100W, four-channel, tube rectified, switchable power-stage amp with Graphic EQ and reverb into that size of box ;).

no offense John buddy and I really do hope you dont take any by me saying this ..............but you listen to the ,in my opinion , buzz box rectfiers compared to the stunning tone of cornford.

ill take the cornford EVERY time over ANY mesa, ive spoken to martin kidd, dude knows his stuff and has a real pride in what cornford are about , and it shows john, it truly does. i belive that design layout to be devised to make the hellcat the best that it can be, that is what cornford has in the heart of all they make.

if martin kidd designed it, the layout will optimise everything.

peace to ya dude

:dude
jimmy
 

Rock Fella

Member
Messages
2,567
Originally posted by big hair
Naw, little amps look odd, esp when sat ontop of 4x12s - kind of like a big person with a small head :)

BTW - what is written on the chassis in the pic??

hair, i think im right in saying that THD have put the flexi into a bigger box because buyers werent so hot on a tiny box sitting on top of their 4x12 cab, i can understand that line of thinking.
 

MikeyG

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
12,080
I'll take any amp in the mesa line over the Cornford MK50. That amp did nada for me ... yes, I'm serious.
 

tralfax19645

Member
Messages
581
Hi,
You want small, some of the old silvertines were TOO small. they had the PT right up against the exposed preamp pots, so much hum because of the layout, they had to use a hum canceling choke in the OT to get the noise out,and darn near impossible to get replacements now.
Rob
 

Jon Silberman

10Q Jerry & Dickey
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
41,957
Originally posted by Matt Gordon
PCB based amps like the DSL's are for all intents, beyond the average users' ability to service if that ever becomes necessary IMHO, outside a simple tube replacement and bias. Anythime you have to lift something off those PCB's, things become iffy at best. Even with a huge dollar desoldering station, once you lift those pads, its all over. IMO, it is best just to replace the complete PCB. These amp makers should be able to supply replacement PCB's at reasonable costs (provided the owner has registered his/her amp with the warranty card/serial #) and thereby negating a lot of the problems with computer-based amps! :D
I am going to question some of your response, Matt. No, you're absolutely right, the average amp tech is lost when it comes to working on a PCB. However, there are some who excel at it. Example: Pete Cage. That's because unlike the "old salty dog techs" we all know and love, Pete and others like him have extensive experience repairing PCBs for computers and similar equipment.

When I brought my Reverend Hellhound to him for various mods, removing components and working on the PCB for that amp was, for Pete, child's play.

http://www.audiocage.com/
 

tele_disease

Member
Messages
26
Wiring looks good, but ...............

If you could see the inside of one of my Matchless or Bad Cat's chassis then, we could talk.

The wiring stuff gives me a fat, then I turn them on and the sound doubles the fat.

Pretenders welcome, but when it comes to this, Sampson has the ground covered from a poser and aural perspective.

:) :) :) :)

ps, peace and love to you all, just watched the Concert For George.........AWESOME
 

tele_disease

Member
Messages
26
John

My comments were directly related to the Sampson designed amps.

Yes there might be one or two 'related' amps that are untidy, but really, when you are faced with the build, setout and wiring quality of a real Sampson amp from the last 16 -17 years, why draw an extreme? (and admit it in your opening stament).

Its like comparing a Marshall Valvestate with a '67 Plexi, both Marshalls right - therefore they are all PCB, transistor, cheap, particle board etc ..........untidy, inconsistent ..........................
 




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