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This morning, I finally reached my tipping point with Ticketmaster

Jon Silberman

10Q Jerry & Dickey
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
43,476
Check your email. They emailed a different code for the second prompt to authenticate your account. It was all digits. You probably missed that.
Wrong. I was watching and checking my email and texts like a hawk. I got no "second email."
 

chrisjnyc

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
7,577
Sorry but I have no further energy, physical or emotional, to waste on them.

If there's anything the pandemic taught me it's I will get by, I will survive just fine without Ticketmaster-run large concerts. I'm better off spending less money on smaller local acts.

Pretty much everyone has a ticket master horror story, they are a monopoly and the only game in town for most big venues. I would bet that you will be back to buy more seats... how many small local clubs are still open and not controlled by live nation\ticket master?
 

Bobbyoso

Member
Messages
500
During my misspent youth, I saw the (Grateful) Dead literally dozens of times prior to Pigpen's demise, along with Hendrix, Jeff Beck, Allmans, BB King, Mahavishnu Orchestra, and many, many other artists and groups, at the Fillmore East and even earlier, the Cafe Au Gogo and many other venues.

Tix at the time (approx 50 years ago) were $3.50, $4.50, and $5.50. At the highest price, you were often less than 15 feet from the stage (of a musical-sounding, 2500-seat venue). To see Hendrix. Or other top acts. Often three of them on the same bill.

Tickets were PRINTED, and serious work was required for, say, the Fillmore East to equitably distribute these tix to the various brick-and-mortar ticket selling locations in a 40-mile radius. These tix had to be hard to counterfeit, specify the exact seat you had bought, and all of the ticket sellers had a pretty good range of seats, from center orchestra to second mezzanine, so the logistics were nontrivial.

Nevertheless, all the logistics, printing costs, physical ticket distribution costs, payments to the ticket sellers, etc., were covered by a max $5.50 ticket price.

There were any number of incredible shows (a weekend where the Allmans and the Dead, the real bands, with Duane and Berry and Pigpen all alive and breathing fire for 6-7 hours/night between them, were double-billed and swapped headline billing comes to mind, but so do dozens of others).

I was a teenage guitar maniac with high school to attend and a typical part-time job back then--and I could afford to see pretty much anyone, anytime (Segovia at Carnegie Hall? $5.50 please!).

I am retired from a pretty decent set of careers now, including music due to Covid these days, and there is NO WAY I would, or could afford to, pay the current prices and extortionate "convenience" fees to see the arthritic, geriatric, lethargic remains of the greatest old bands on a regular basis

Even if they were the SAME bands, with original lineups as in 1970, how much do you think Dead/Allman tix, in a small theatre, not a hockey rink, would cost today? $300? $500? Anything within 50 yards of a stage these days is "VIP ticket" territory.

So we're now paying Ticketmaster 20x the ENTIRE 1970 ticket price for merely the "convenience" of the entire ticket distribution system being in software, printing the tickets MYSELF, with my ink, no one from Ticketmaster is gumshoeing tickets all over the countryside, AND the venues are way too huge and not set up for good sound?

Anyway, I realize this is "old man yelling at clouds" stuff--but the point is, due largely to Ticketmaster and maybe the Eagles, ticket prices have gone up 100 TIMES their prices 50 years ago, in vastly inferior venues, for eviscerated, octogenarian acts playing 75-minute sets. Almost nothing else has been that exorbitantly inflated while providing a degraded product over that time span. Gas was ~40 cents a gallon back then, for premium. Imagine if it were now $40.00 a gallon, for low-octane, high-ethanol content crap? That's roughly analogous.

Need to find a way to get rid of all the middlemen, carpetbaggers, and interlopers being overpaid for their irrelevance to the product. In general, but in "big" music especially. Ticketmaster would be a GREAT start.

Fortunately, I did what Jon suggests a dozen years ago, and go see jazz artists from 15 feet away in an intimate club for 1/10th the vig. And remember with fondness the priceless performances I witnessed back when it was mostly about the music.
 

teleman1

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
15,595
FYI Folks, this is a capitalistic venture and you folks are all wound up, as I have been. Kids, we really do not have a voice much anymore. Corporations rule the day. Housing, Gas, electricity, food, medical, transportation, insurance, real estate,( buying, selling, or renting). How do you get the best housing & education? How do you receive medical attention? What influences most everything around you? And you expect the entertainment industry to work better for your needs? Corporations call the shots of every entity surrounding your life. Can't you folks tell what is going on? GO look around on your computer, things you do, things you like. Corporations have a hold on everything. And you guys are expecting passion from them? Understanding the value of the arts? One more thing, they are just getting started and are part of the lil incident that has messed us all in the last 15 months. You gotta love it. There are other Elephants in the room that people are in denial about, but you get the picture.

Set list of concert I went to in 1972, they were a really good band. Tickets were 8-10 dollars. It was, you sent your money and the tickets came by mail. I order one for me & they sent 2,so 2 for 1. But understand, that was a whole lotta dough to fork out and I remember grumblings about it. Anyone find a song they don't like here?

  1. Brown Sugar

    Play Video
  2. Bitch

    Play Video
  3. Rocks Off

    Play Video
  4. Gimme Shelter

    Play Video
  5. Happy

    Play Video
  6. Tumbling Dice

    Play Video
  7. Love in Vain
    (Robert Johnson cover)
    Play Video
  8. Sweet Virginia

    Play Video
  9. You Can't Always Get What You Want

    Play Video
  10. All Down the Line

    Play Video
  11. Midnight Rambler

    Play Video
  12. Bye Bye Johnny
    (Chuck Berry cover)
    Play Video
  13. Rip This Joint

    Play Video
  14. Jumpin' Jack Flash

    Play Video
  15. Street Fighting Man
 
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Yooper

Member
Messages
976
To repeat, one of the things I learned during the pandemic is that I don't need Ticketmaster-type large venue shows. I truly don't. I've lived a happy 15 months with none while saving a ton of money my wife and I are now using for international travel.

It doesn't matter to me anymore what Ticketmaster does or controls: I'm no longer riding on their merry-go-round. And ya know, it feels good. :)

We've saved enough to go see Dark Star Orchestra in Jamaica. 4 nights of Grateful Dead music on the beach with 600 of our closest friends.

These days DSO sounds more like the good old Grateful Dead than DeadCo.
 

Bobbyoso

Member
Messages
500
FYI Folks, this is a capitalistic venture and you folks are all wound up, as I have been. Kids, we really do not have a voice much anymore. Corporations rule the day. Housing, Gas, electricity, food, medical, transportation, insurance, real estate,( buying, selling, or renting). How do you get the best housing & education? How do you receive medical attention? What influences most everything around you? And you expect the entertainment industry to work better for your needs? Corporations call the shots of every entity surrounding your life. Can't you folks tell what is going on? GO look around on your computer, things you do, things you like. Corporations have a hold on everything. And you guys are expecting passion from them? Understanding the value of the arts? One more thing, they are just getting started and are part of the lil incident that has messed us all in the last 15 months. You gotta love it. There are other Elephants in the room that people are in denial about, but you get the picture.

Set list of concert I went to in 1972, they were a really good band. Tickets were 8-10 dollars. It was, you sent your money and the tickets came by mail. I order one for me & they sent 2,so 2 for 1. But understand, that was a whole lotta dough to fork out and I remember grumblings about it. Anyone find a song they don't like here?

  1. Brown Sugar

    Play Video
  2. Bitch

    Play Video
  3. Rocks Off

    Play Video
  4. Gimme Shelter

    Play Video
  5. Happy

    Play Video
  6. Tumbling Dice

    Play Video
  7. Love in Vain
    (Robert Johnson cover)
    Play Video
  8. Sweet Virginia

    Play Video
  9. You Can't Always Get What You Want

    Play Video
  10. All Down the Line

    Play Video
  11. Midnight Rambler

    Play Video
  12. Bye Bye Johnny
    (Chuck Berry cover)
    Play Video
  13. Rip This Joint

    Play Video
  14. Jumpin' Jack Flash

    Play Video
  15. Street Fighting Man
No one is expecting passion, or compassion, competence, or conscience from corporations. The only thing you can do is vote with your wallet. Guaranteed, a concerted effort to boycott Ticketron events would have an effect. Saying "because corporations" and shrugging it off as unavoidable is how we got here.

And as a working musician over several decades, I'd prefer that as close to 100% of my ticket price (when I'm buying) go to the artists, and people actually involved in the production, rather than to a holding corporation that skims an embarrassing %age for an even more embarrassing and useless contribution to the event.
 
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ckfoxtrot

Member
Messages
4,496
1984 is a bit early. The range I mentioned in my post was 1985-1994.

I was mowing lawns and delivering newspapers in high school and wasn’t a rich kid or anything. I had no trouble affording weekly concerts based on what I made from my two part time jobs. $10 lawn tickets at the outdoor shed, $20 for upper tier tickets at the arena and $30 for lower tier arena for bands you actually cared about.

Oops, my bad.

$10, $20, and $30 in '85 look like ~$25, ~$50, and ~$74.50 adjusted for 2021. For 1994 the figures look like ~$18, ~$36, and ~$54.
 

Vuur

Member
Messages
175
Capitalism works fine. Businesses that offer goods/services at prices few are willing to pay mostly go broke. If you don’t like the prices, don’t buy. You don’t HAVE to see the concert/game. Use your power as a consumer.

Please don’t whine about TM, the Dallas Mavericks, season ticket holders, music groups, and “the system.” You are not a victim, and you don’t have a “right” to see a particular music group or sporting event. Many of us - who have given in to the hype and overpaid - are partly responsible for creating this situation.

If you truly believe it’s worth it, pay the price. If you don’t, spend your time and money elsewhere. But please quit yer @#$!.

Except, in this context TM has a monopoly. And concert tickets are goods with a hard limit on quantity, meaning, any interested competition can't just show up and compete, because they simply can't produce extra quantities. And it's a product where supply can't keep up with demand (bands can't perform 500 days a year).
Also, neither the bands or the venues are profiting from us paying higher prices. The ticket market has become a system in which, essentially, middlemen are funnelling big amounts of cash directly from the consumers wallet to their wallets, while adding zero value.

You say "if it's too expensive, don't buy it". Well, that would fly if there would be competition, and, if that competition would make a profit by offering lower prices. In this context, it just means: these concerts are a desirable and affordable product that the system has made unaffordable for the average citizen.

That doesn't exactly fit my definition of "it works fine".


And, from a broader perspective: even if there wouldn't be a monopoly; consumer power and competition don't always magically compensate for the basic premise of capitalism: that the sole aim for companies is their own profit. There absolutely needs to be regulations, especially when it comes to vital products such as water, food, medicines, electricity, etcetera.
Therefore, I also think it's a stretch to say a system works fine, when it will be harmful when allowed to operate freely.
 

Dr. Tweedbucket

Deluxe model available !!!11
Messages
48,142
I'm still waiting on my confirmation on the Beatles Shea Stadium concert. They took my money and asked me to wait a minute. I never got the tickets or any kind of confirmation but I'm pretty sure I'm in. :(
 

Traintrack

Where is the Talent?
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,041
You folks should read some books on the concert industry,

The biggest crooks are the bands themselves. Part of the tour arrangements is that they get large chunk of the best seats in the house. They write that off as promotional expenses. They in turn sell them the biggest ticket brokers in each market for cash. EVERY BAND does it.

If you get to sit up front, ask people around you if they bought their seats in the secondary market. 90%


Live shows are all subwoofers these days. I do not need to hear a Kickdrum for $250
 

RCCola

(|@ / \ @ |.)
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
5,452
JRAD def the way to go

Dead n Co seem to be playing slower and slower each year....
 

slogger

Member
Messages
1,728
I signed up for the "privilege" of buying Dead and Company tix from Ticketmaster. They sent me a link and a passcode. The link worked to open a "waiting room" page. The passcode worked to get me into the waiting room. After a short wait, the "buy tix" page opened. I tried to buy them. They required the passcode again. And this time, they wouldn't accept it - the very same passcode they sent me to use for the tix buying process.

I've had it with those gonifs. I closed the window and gave up. Not only on buying the tix now but on going to the show at all.

This is not the way you treat people you want as customers.

I see Joe Russo's Amost Dead is playing the MECU Pavillion in Baltimore August 21. I'll spend my ticket money on that show instead.
I feel your pain. There is nothing right about Ticketmaster. It is a parasite.
I wanted to buy tickets to a Willie Nelson show at Pier 6 in Baltimore. The ticket price started out at $90 for two tix. By the time I had them in checkout they were $140. I refused to buy them. That was 2005. I haven’t bought a ticket from them since.
 

Chase Fuller

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
359
The exact same thing happened to me as OP with Dead & Co. for Greatwoods on Wednesday. I was livid. I went through all the same motions and experienced the same issues you did. Eventually, I gave up and went for a run. After the run I checked to see if there were any seats available and was somehow able to score singles for both nights.

I’m really anxious about today’s Phish public on sale shows for ATL. I know they’ll be in crazy high demand, which is fine (though I miss the days when I could get Phish tickets easily and affordably), but knowing that I’ll likely encounter demand plus a broken system is not a fun fact to recognize.
 

BK Verbs

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
2,063
I signed up for the "privilege" of buying Dead and Company tix from Ticketmaster. They sent me a link and a passcode. The link worked to open a "waiting room" page. The passcode worked to get me into the waiting room. After a short wait, the "buy tix" page opened. I tried to buy them. They required the passcode again. And this time, they wouldn't accept it - the very same passcode they sent me to use for the tix buying process.

I've had it with those gonifs. I closed the window and gave up. Not only on buying the tix now but on going to the show at all.

This is not the way you treat people you want as customers.

I see Joe Russo's Amost Dead is playing the MECU Pavillion in Baltimore August 21. I'll spend my ticket money on that show instead.
I got tickets to Citifield And Bethel, but the process was overly complicated. Prices were generally better than I expected. Killer seats down front at Citi for $149+fees. $55 lawn seats at Bethel.

Received email saying I was in for presale.
Received texts with codes for each venue.
Signed into the TM App 10 minutes before sale.
Once the sale began, I selected a venue, then they texted me a code to enter to verify my identity, I entered code and was sent immediately to line (2000+ ahead of me for Citifield).
Waited until it was my turn. Then it let me into the seat selection screen with venue seating chart.
Selected tickets several times and was informed those were already taken. Finally the tickets I selected were available.
I was asked to enter my texted venue code.
Processed the sale with my on file credit card.

Repeated process for Bethel, but the line was much better.
 

MikeMcK

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
6,145
I just saw a massive FB post about this... there's a large contingent of local Deadheads who tried in vain to get those tickets, and for those who did it seemed ironic that they paid what they did to see the remnants of the band that once encouraged bootlegging.

Just before the shutdown I did a gig where tickets were advertised at $40. But in talking to people afterward, everyone seemed to have paid around $55, 37.5% more than the price. I was embarrassed by it.
 
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