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Those playing with a tunomatic bridge...where are you rrsting your picking hand??

Russ73

Member
Messages
1,203
I recently got a guitar with a tunimatic...on a trem I usually rest my palm on the trem but the tunomatic seems to stick up and inch...any tricks to smooth playing??
 

dewey decibel

Member
Messages
10,672
It just gonna take a couple weeks to adjust. Truth is, I wish I didn't rest my hand at all and kept it floating, I think it's better overall technique. I've even tried to change it but it takes more discipline than I seem to have.
 

halcyon

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,490
I don't rest my hand on the bridge (my jazz teacher beat that habit out of me years ago). It's only there on the occasion that I need to palm-mute the strings.
 

RevDrucifer

Member
Messages
659
Right on the edge of the post holding it in place. I don’t have a TOM specifically, but the same idea/setup. This was another thing Ibanez did extremely well and decided to abandon, the Gibraltar III.

 

just_one_more

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,318
If I am doing intricate single note stuff, I anchor my pinkie finger about 1/2" below the high e and a little on front of the tom. Other than that I only touch the bridge when muting.
 

Guitarworks

Member
Messages
10,680
Do not like the Tuneomatic or ABR bridge whatsoever. Never have. The right angle corners on the saddles are so sharp it feels like I'm resting my hand on the points of 12 little thumbtacks gouging into the flesh of my right hand every time I play one. PRS's adjustable saddle wraparound was the answer for me. They did it right. The saddles don't poke and it's very comfortable.
 

cap10kirk

Member
Messages
8,517
I only rest my hand on the bridge when palm muting, and sometimes on the strings behind the bridge when I'm picking really close to the bridge. But most of the time my picking hand isn't resting on the guitar at all, I change where I pick/strum way too much for that.
 

Gclef

Member
Messages
2,942
I played strats for 2 decades before I got a guitar with a tune-o-matic bridge.

I really like them! 4 of my 9 have TOM bridges

My hand feels more natural on them.


As far as tips: you just have to put the time in. It becomes second nature
 

Tomi JR

Member
Messages
106
I also don’t rest my hand on the bridge, unless doing some palm muting.

My problem back in the day was the opposite. I was so used to TOM-bridges and resting my hand on it, that when I picked a guitar with a trem or a Strat-style hardtail, I couldn’t even play the damn thing.

So I kicked the habit and learned not to rest my hand on the bridge. I really recommend doing the same.
 

Yamaha 350

Member
Messages
7,361
I do not think about it much. I'm born with a birth defect anyways in my left hand. My fret hand so I play different than you would 2 percent.
 

sunking101

Member
Messages
1,958
Do not like the Tuneomatic or ABR bridge whatsoever. Never have. The right angle corners on the saddles are so sharp it feels like I'm resting my hand on the points of 12 little thumbtacks gouging into the flesh of my right hand every time I play one. PRS's adjustable saddle wraparound was the answer for me. They did it right. The saddles don't poke and it's very comfortable.
The sharp saddle screws on a Fender are much worse IME.
 

fuzz guy

Member
Messages
749
I never realized that people rest their hand while playing, that would feel so unnatural. I don't see how I could play properly doing that. Like others mentioned above, I only do it when muting. Most of my guitars are Gibson style with tuneomatics or wraptails.
 

korus

Member
Messages
1,339
Original ABR-1 saddles were not only made of softer brass to define less metallic tone than modern ones have. Those original ABR-1 saddles also had ROUNDED EDGES and WIDE FLAT TOP.

It is common sense, really. There is no hard science involved. How stupid were and are those who 'improve(d)'... never mind. Profit is God. Of incompetence.

 




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