Tips for strong foundation,better improvement...

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by Tomo, Dec 19, 2009.

  1. Tomo

    Tomo Member

    Messages:
    16,624
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2004
    Location:
    Boston, Mass
    I really feel that foundation is really important for improving guitar playing.

    ...all like to play licks, shapes etc, when you plug your guitar into an amp.
    That's totally normal and fine. but if you want to play your guitar better and better...maybe you can check something (which you didn't notice before) so you will enjoy your guitar playing more and more.

    You all have great insights and tips for this area. Hope everyone of you write a simple tip regarding this topic. Foundation, basics, good manner (playing and practicing.)

    First.. I think you shouldn't think this way... "If you know scales and theory, you can play solo better"

    I rephrases, you can learn scales and learn your fretboard so that you can play phrases or specific notes from scale when you hear it.

    I don't push theory too much. but I really recommend to understand "degrees" on notes, chords. About color! and "triad"

    By the way, so many great threads from everyone so if you find any good thread. Please copy here so that we can jump around very easy.

    like this,

    "Triad thread"
    http://www.thegearpage.net/board/showthread.php?t=87931

    "Performance skills, practicing ideas"
    http://www.thegearpage.net/board/showthread.php?t=604136

    "Picking dynamics"
    http://www.thegearpage.net/board/showthread.php?t=147233

    I look forward to hearing from everyone , passionate guitar players!

    Thank you.


    Tomo
     
  2. Kappy

    Kappy Member

    Messages:
    14,044
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2005
    Location:
    West Village, NYC
  3. Tomo

    Tomo Member

    Messages:
    16,624
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2004
    Location:
    Boston, Mass
    I just wrote there... we are thinking same thing. I just wrote a book "How to play by ear and feel" 8 chapters with very details... what should do, what should not do or any "holes" ... I just made recording for cd. First in Japanese... I made this book for Rittor Music in Japan. I hope they can make this English version available later. This is exactly what you are looking for!

    Tomo
     
  4. Tomo

    Tomo Member

    Messages:
    16,624
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2004
    Location:
    Boston, Mass
  5. Kappy

    Kappy Member

    Messages:
    14,044
    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2005
    Location:
    West Village, NYC
    Tomo, I started another thread too... sort of the same thing, but with a different focus: "what is not very important to focus on". I thought it might give some interesting new perspective. I know we all hear kinds of things that are important to practice (like 3 & 4 octave arpeggios/scales), but are they really that important? Anyway, thought you'd like to know about it.

    Thanks,

    Dave
     
  6. KRosser

    KRosser Member

    Messages:
    14,095
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2004
    Location:
    Pasadena, CA
    1) Practice slowly.

    2) As soon as possible, learn all the names of all the notes on the fretboard, even if you're not going to learn to read music.
     
  7. Tomo

    Tomo Member

    Messages:
    16,624
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2004
    Location:
    Boston, Mass
    Dave,

    What's major distractions! That's a part of my new book/CD. Not only what, how to do. What not to do! Smart! Thank you very much!

    Tomo
     
  8. Tomo

    Tomo Member

    Messages:
    16,624
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2004
    Location:
    Boston, Mass
    Ken,

    You can offer many choices of these ideas. but you only choose two items.
    I love it. That's very important to focus, detail about less items so that you make your paths really clear... then you can branch out ...

    Thank you so much! I agree. Practice slowly... notes name, degrees.
    A lot of people knew many licks, chords without that... it's tough to apply one to another. Then more memorization (too much time!)

    Tomo
     
  9. jspax7

    jspax7 Member

    Messages:
    2,224
    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2005
    Location:
    CA
    I teach a chord tone (or target note) approach. You must know the notes to do it. If you're playing over 7th chords, you have 4 choices. Each one is a different color and leads the solo in a different direction.

    Most students are too dependent on shapes and patterns and it reflects n their playing.
     
  10. greggorypeccary

    greggorypeccary Member

    Messages:
    7,634
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2006
    Location:
    Raleigh, NC
    Something I've been working on lately - knowing where various intervals are. Helpful for both single note stuff and chords.
     
  11. Tomo

    Tomo Member

    Messages:
    16,624
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2004
    Location:
    Boston, Mass
    Thank you! Once I wrote out shapes of chords... I have them but I don't use them. I tell my students not to use a word "shapes" Teaching arpeggios are touch. I need to know when to stop!

    Tomo
     
  12. Tomo

    Tomo Member

    Messages:
    16,624
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2004
    Location:
    Boston, Mass
    Great! Interval studies. 6th interval to play on one sting, 2 strings (1st & 2nd etc) or skip string1st & 3rd or 2nd & 4th...etc). Now you can use that play over A-7.... or over blues... Thanks.

    Tomo
     
  13. rockstarjay

    rockstarjay Member

    Messages:
    367
    Joined:
    Sep 27, 2008
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    When learning something new, don't neglect the rhythm. Play it correctly from the start, even if that means slowing the tempo way down. The right hand is too often neglected in favor of the intellectual pursuits of the left.
     
  14. Tomo

    Tomo Member

    Messages:
    16,624
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2004
    Location:
    Boston, Mass
    Thanks! Plus one for that. Time, feel... very important for me. Like Ken said in different thread (Sweep picking???) Should play slowly and make sure 8th notes (even) control well. Right hand rhythm! I made a section of those studies... my AYGP dvd.

    Tomo
     
  15. Tomo

    Tomo Member

    Messages:
    16,624
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2004
    Location:
    Boston, Mass
  16. brothertupelo

    brothertupelo Senior Member

    Messages:
    193
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2009
    Location:
    portland
    good rhythm (not JUST timing, but rhythm), lots of practice.
     
  17. metronome

    metronome Member

    Messages:
    48
    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2009
    I have found that sometimes the best way to learn and improve is to sit down and listen to some great artists for inspiration. Try it sometimes with your guitar in hand,and other times without and just listen.

    Putting on a BB King album, some SRV, Albert, or the any inspirational player can be very enlightening. I especially like the listening to BB stuff, as you can really come to realize that simple can be better.
     
  18. Tomo

    Tomo Member

    Messages:
    16,624
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2004
    Location:
    Boston, Mass
    Thanks guys for your inputs here. Great! I am writing tunes right now. More and more... I write tunes when I don't play my guitar. Now I will go take a walk with my dog. Look forward to finish writing my new tune. (working on other section!). It's in C#.

    Tomo
     
  19. vac4873

    vac4873 Member

    Messages:
    12
    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2009
    I have two fundamentals that I like to ingrain into students

    1. Limit your physical movements as much as possible. Try to do it with the minimum amount of movement necessary. This applies to both right and left hands equally.

    2. When you practice, make music. Even if it's "just an exercise", do your best to make it sound musical. This isn't actually mine, I saw it on "Why Toes Tap" by Wynton Marsalis.
     
  20. Tomo

    Tomo Member

    Messages:
    16,624
    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2004
    Location:
    Boston, Mass
    Thank you!

    Tomo
     

Share This Page