Tips/good sites to learn about playing arpeggios?

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by steven.rogers, Aug 3, 2006.

  1. steven.rogers

    steven.rogers Supporting Member

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    I've been trying to play jazz a lot lately, and I kind of feel like I'm relying too much on scales. I've heard from numerous people that thinking in arpeggios will help to improve improvisation, and I think I want to get started in that direction. It may just be me, but I'm not really a big fan of modes, either. It just seems like there is too much to have to think about, with all the altered notes of the different modes. I've just been playing around with scales that I liked, i.e. harmonic and melodic minor, whole tone, and just even the plain old major scale. And sometimes I'll just not think about anything - no scales or chords or anything. If I know the song well enough, I'll know what sound is coming next and I just play what sounds good to me. That's probably not very good for progressing, but hey, I do it all the time when I'm just noodling around. But anyway, I just wanted to see if anyone here had any tips or good sites or whatever about learning arpeggios and how to apply them in improv.

    And one more sort of off topic question - if there is a chord written as something like D7+5+9, that just means the same as a D7#5#9, right?

    Thanks for any and all help!
     
  2. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    Yeah, + is an abbreviation for augmented. If you already have a grip on 5-7 positions for major and minor scales (along with harmonic and melodic minor), then why not just figure out the arpeggios by starting each note of the scale and playing up in 3rds diatonically? It shouldn't take you too long to map them out in each of your 5, 6 or 7 positions (depending on your approach to scales). It'll probably help you learn them better than just referencing patterns in a book. Good luck either way.

    P.S. The modes aren't that complicated once you know them. It's not bad to have a working relationship with them if only to be able to communicate with and understand other musicians.
     
  3. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    BTW, I seem to get the impression from a couple of people I recently studied with that learning tons and tons of chord voicings (by building them and learning their inversions) was a far superior way to learn how to think about chord tones, rather than thinking specifically about arpeggios as an end in themselves. So as a start, learning all your drop 2 block voicings and your drop 3 voicings for as many chords as you can and being able to play them on command in common progressions with a metronome through the cycle of 4ths will help put chord tones on the fingerboard in perspective.
     
  4. gennation

    gennation Member

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    The answer is in the chords within the scales...IOW...a G Major scale is nothing more than a Gmaj13 arpeggio...unorganized. But, since arps don't necessary have to fall right in sequential order, the scale contains the tone of MANY arpeggios...

    Code:
    
    G Major scale (G A B C D E F# G or R 9 M3 11 5 13 M7 R)
    
    E-----------------------------------------2--3--
    B-----------------------------------3--5--------
    G--------------------------2--4--5--------------
    D-----------------2--4--5-----------------------
    A--------2--3--5--------------------------------
    E--3--5-----------------------------------------
    
    Gmaj13 arpeggio (G B D F# A C E G or R M3 5 M7 9 11 13)
    
    E--------------------------
    B--------------------5--8--
    G-----------------5--------
    D-----------4--7-----------
    A-----2--5-----------------
    E--3-----------------------
    
    Each contain the exact same notes. Arranged in ANY order they could be an arp or a scale...you're call really.

    So, don't just dump scales...just take some time to learn what's IN them. There's a lot of music in there.

    If you just did arps...you'd end up looking for something new.

    But, if you start use arps AND scales (which are pretty much the same thing) you'll end up with a bigger sound, and be on your way to playing music as opposed to riffs or bits and peices.

    You can repeat the same type of process with each of the modes/Diatonic Scales.
     
  5. gennation

    gennation Member

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  6. Jeeves

    Jeeves Member

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    Mimi Fox has a book + CD called 'Guitar Arpeggio studies on Jazz Standards'. Published by Mel Bay and available on Amazon.

    Its a nice reference to have - she's an awesome player btw - but nothing that you couldn't figure out yourself with a pencil and some manuscript paper.

    Check out Tomo's triad thread if you haven't already - good stuff.
     
  7. gregit

    gregit Member

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    Nice info Mike...thanks for the links.
     
  8. gennation

    gennation Member

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  9. randy morser

    randy morser Member

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    buy chuck wanye's book on arpeggios. he was a master of sweep-picking through blazing arpeggios in 1949 or so. I actually think he invented sweep picking in the 40s. his book was writen in the 80s or 90s. its good and covers what you need to know about arpeggios in the straight ahead idiom.

    randy
     

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