Tips to spice up the I, IV, V stuff

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by Turi, Apr 20, 2015.

  1. Turi

    Turi Member

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    Hey, check this out - nabbed it from a lesson in rockabilly, but it's totally cool.

    Make the I chord a Dom13 (I think).
    In A, that's

    575675

    Sounds sick, right?

    Make the IV chord a 9th
    That's a D, so

    x54555x

    You can add a 5 on the high E string too and make it a 13th (I think)
    Or remove the 5 on the B string, and it's a Dom7th

    Do the exact same thing you did on the IV chord, for the V chord - so that's an E

    x76777x

    Sounds sweet as.

    Slide into any of the chords from a semi-tone down, and it just sounds sick as.
    Wish I knew this stuff early.


    Anyone else got some cool tricks for the I, IV, V stuff?
    Really starting to dig it and would love to spice it up some more, these chord extensions are great.
     
  2. JonR

    JonR Member

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    For blues/rockabilly, you're absolutely right - although you've got one too many strings on the D9 and E9 ;):

    D9 = x5455x, or x54555
    E9 = x7677x, or x76777

    The 1st string is the 5th of the chord, which is optional. The middle 4 give you R-3-b7-9.)

    To add a 13th, use pinky as follows:

    D13 = x54557
    E13 = x76779

    When playing with band, you can reduce any of those shapes to the top 4 strings, which makes those half-step approaches easier. (You don't need the chord root because the bass will play that ;).)

    You can make the V7 even funkier by making it an altered dom7:

    x76788 = E7#5#9 (R-3-b7-#9-#5) (pinky on top two)

    It works on the V7 (in this context) because those altered notes are part of the A blues scale - as I'm sure you'll recognise from the A minor pent pattern ;).
    For that reason, altering the I and IV in the same way probably won't work so well. But a #9 might work on the I chord:

    A7#9 = xx7688 (R-3-b7-#9)

    The #9 alone is also good on the E7 shape: x7678x (x76787 if you want to include the natural 5th)
     
  3. dewey decibel

    dewey decibel Member

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    Sick? I don't know, but that's a lotta notes IMO. Ever try this?

    5x567x

    or just this?

    xx567x

    Works good lower too (although starting on the low E is usually too low), try this for the IV chord:

    x344xx

    I think you'll find leaving the root on top really limits things, a 5th on top keeps options open. I also really like this voicing:

    x4545x

    Another this you can try is playing off the v of each dominant chord. Here's a very common move:

    1)
    2)7-5
    3)6-4
    4)7-5
    5)
    6)

    or take it up an octave:

    1)9--7
    2)10-8
    3)11-9
    4)
    5)
    6)

    You're taking an F#min triad and sliding down to an Emin triad. The nice thing about dominant chords is there are no avoid notes, so you can use any of the other chords in the key (of course what actually works and sounds good comes down to taste and your skill level). Try it!
     
  4. Baminated

    Baminated Member

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    Here's a vid i started a thead on a while back with pretty minimal response. It's more focused on "spicing things up" rhythmically with very simple harmony for the chords and simple melody for the single note lines (dominant pentatonics respective to each I IV, V). there i s some redundancy, so i def need to edit it

     
  5. dallasblues

    dallasblues Member

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    I spice up I-IV-V by listening to lots of Kenny Burrell, Grant Green and Miles Davis.
     
  6. gennation

    gennation Member

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    Walk the A13 into the D9...

    Code:
      A13 A7#5 D9
    E-----------------
    B--7--6-----5-------------
    G--6--6-----5---------------
    D--5--5-----4----------------
    A--x--------5--------------
    E--5--5------------------
    
    If you focus on the D G and B strings, it's like you are moving a Eb9 chord into the D9 chord, but Eb9 relates to the D9 as a V7alt chord in a V-I move...A7 to D is V to I where D is the target chord.

    Now you know how the F note can be used in the A Blues. Also, play those chords backwards to get from D9 back to A13.
     
  7. guitarjazz

    guitarjazz Member

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    I spice them up by loudly singing:
    "How does it feel
    To be on your own
    A complete unknown
    No direction home....."
     
  8. flatnine

    flatnine Supporting Member

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    I like these rootless grips for A blues-

    A9
    x4545x

    D13
    x3443x

    E13
    x5665x

    They feel great under your fingers and sound sophisticated...I think I got them from Robben but might have been Setzer...
     
  9. JonR

    JonR Member

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    And then segue into...
    "Bam - ba, bamba
    Bam - ba, bamba
    shake it up baby (shake it up baby)
    twist and shout (twist and shout)
    like a rolling st....whoops!"
     
  10. Turi

    Turi Member

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    Cheers fellas, there's some great stuff here that I'll definitely be nabbing.

    Using less notes makes sense in a band situation.. I'm just noobing out solo at the moment, definitely need to work on using less notes..

    I dig that little walk down from A13 to D9, very cool.

    Got some cool stuff here I need to work into what I've got. Awesome.

    Thanks fellas!

    Baminated - I can't watch the vid, don't have 17 minutes right now - will definitely check it out next time the baby goes to sleep!
     
  11. Bluesful

    Bluesful Supporting Member

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    I got a lot of the chords and passing chords/tones in this thread from Mickey Baker's book, which is exactly where Robben got them from. But to me Robben is the master of this stuff. He also will change the root on the bottom to form other chords - as an example removing a Bb root from a Bb13 chord and hitting a open E to form a E7#9 chord. Great stuff.
     
  12. GLB98

    GLB98 Member

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    You (OP) wrote in another thread about your observation that Robben Ford is just another blues guy. Listen closer, and you'll hear some serious blues spicing going on.

    In fact he has several Truefire course which deal heavily with the chords that the uses.
     
  13. Turi

    Turi Member

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    Yeah I hadn't looked too far into him before I wrote that post.
    Only some brief listens of some youtube clips.

    I watched the ones posted in that other thread, and I understand his appeal a little more now - he's not really a normal blues player.. spices things up with some cool chord alterations and substitutions or whatever, gives them a bit of a jazzy feel.
    Kind of reminds me of like that early '90s R'n'B (the good stuff!) with some of his chords and playing.
     
  14. cram

    cram Member

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    The shift in timing you're showing here is the stuff that piques the interest of drummers I play with. I go to a few jams hosted by friends at their houses and host myself. If a rhythm section is *listening* while we're playing, it makes for a fruitful experience.

    A drummer can lead a guitarist into those accents and shifts in feel or time. - that's the good stuff.
     

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