Tonemaster Princeton Reverb

Very interesting. Sounds good.
I wish there was a bit of commentary: when it will come out, expected price, etc.
The last section of the video is 'Play in your room with the gain on 10'. dB meter reaching 95dB. I suppose they mislabeled the video.
 
For more than a year I've been contemplating getting either a 65' reissue or a '68 Custom Princeton, but a couple of months ago I ended up getting a Blonde Tone Master Deluxe Reverb, because of the versatility (the autenuator, the xlr-out etc.) And I'm loving it!

But of course the thought of a totally dimed Princeton is still lurking in the back of my mind. And now Fender pulls this thing on me! I might have to sell either my NOS-tube-fitted 57 Tweed Deluxe clone, or one of the children...
 
Just watching this demo thinking that these Tonemaster amps would be killer if you could use some of the onboard DSP for deeper editing and effects.

There's a usb in the back of these amps - imagine hooking up your phone and using an app to audition different preamp and power amp tubes, changing the headroom of the amp, the amount of compression, routing a digital delay and eq after the virtual power amp, hitting the front of the amp with a virtual Klon, KOT, TS, Rat, Metal Zone, whatever you're into... Or simply switching between black, silver, and brown panel circuits.

In other words, image if Fender used the DSP to meet the needs of players in this century as well as the previous one.
 
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Just watching this demo thinking that these Tonemaster amps would be killer if you could use some of the onboard DSP for deeper editing and effects.

There's a usb in the back of these amps - imagine hooking up your phone and using an app to audition different preamp and power amp tubes, changing the headroom of the amp, the amount of compression, routing a digital delay and eq after the virtual power amp, hitting the front of the amp with a virtual Klon, KOT, TS, Rat, Metal Zone, whatever you're into...

In other words, image if Fender used the DSP to meet the needs of players in this century as well as the previous one.
They wouldn't sell like they do.
Fender is doing well with these because they kept it simple. People that want the traditional Fender BF tone but need something light and easy to use live (mic or XLR out). No tubes to take care of but easy enough to operate.
That's where most of the digital amps fail: too many options.
 
Just watching this demo thinking that these Tonemaster amps would be killer if you could use some of the onboard DSP for deeper editing and effects.

There's a usb in the back of these amps - imagine hooking up your phone and using an app to audition different preamp and power amp tubes, changing the headroom of the amp, the amount of compression, routing a digital delay and eq after the virtual power amp, hitting the front of the amp with a virtual Klon, KOT, TS, Rat, Metal Zone, whatever you're into...

In other words, image if Fender used the DSP to meet the needs of players in this century as well as the previous one.
I get what you’re saying, I’d probably enjoy that too.

But that does go somewhat against the whole idea of the tonemaster series. From what I gather, it’s meant to offer modelling technology to those players that specifically don’t like all that deep editing. You aren’t supposed to be able to change and edit the parameters, it’s meant to just sound and respond the same way the stock amp would…but lighter and easier to gig.
 
They wouldn't sell like they do.
Fender is doing well with these because they kept it simple. People that want the traditional Fender BF tone but need something light and easy to use live (mic or XLR out). No tubes to take care of but easy enough to operate.
That's where most of the digital amps fail: too many options.

I think you're right. Tonemasters appeal to me because of those reasons: The same, simplistic, hands-on experience as the real tube amp but no tubes to maintain, lightweight, and silent jamming and DI recording.
 
I get what you’re saying, I’d probably enjoy that too.

But that does go somewhat against the whole idea of the tonemaster series. From what I gather, it’s meant to offer modelling technology to those players that specifically don’t like all that deep editing. You aren’t supposed to be able to change and edit the parameters, it’s meant to just sound and respond the same way the stock amp would…but lighter and easier to gig.
They wouldn't sell like they do.
Fender is doing well with these because they kept it simple. People that want the traditional Fender BF tone but need something light and easy to use live (mic or XLR out). No tubes to take care of but easy enough to operate.
That's where most of the digital amps fail: too many options.

I agree with you both - there's a conscious design decision with this series to keep the amps simple, follow traditional aesthetics, but with a little modern convenience.

My point is that externally, these amps could look and function just as they do now, but include an app for deep editing for those that want it.

This approach wouldn't deter the traditionalists or kill sales as these amps could be used exactly as they are now... But they would appeal to players with a more modern outlook, players used to deep editing via software. I suppose like the Source Audio model of 'layered complexity'.

Also, it occurs to me that lots of players modify the phase inverters or add a mid tone control on the original tube versions; I feel like it would be helpful for Fender to at least offer DSP versions of these common mods for the TMP.

Perhaps the point is that modern players would just prefer a modeller in the first place and that the tone master series has established its niche as a more convenient alternative to the original tube amps.

As it stands, the original tube amp is more customisable than the digital version!
 
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They wouldn't sell like they do.
Fender is doing well with these because they kept it simple. People that want the traditional Fender BF tone but need something light and easy to use live (mic or XLR out). No tubes to take care of but easy enough to operate.
That's where most of the digital amps fail: too many options.
While I don't disagree with you (and saying this as an Axe-Fx 3 user), at the same time I feel the Tonemaster range throws away all the benefits that digital can offer easier than real amps.

While the speaker choice, chassis size and authentic looks are important factors for this line up, at the same time these could offer for example different eras of the same amp. You could have a simple 3-way switch that turns a Deluxe Reverb from Blackface to Brownface to Silverface. Extra options without making it any more complex. Similarly the bright switch should be a real toggle switch rather than a firmware update.

The Quilter Aviator Cub hit the Tonemaster premise better despite not being a digital modeler.

To me "like the tube amp, warts and all, but digital" is not what I want out of a digital amp and that's why I have no interest in owning a Tonemaster or for example the Universal Audio amp sim pedals.
 




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