tools for shaping headstocks

Discussion in 'Luthier's Guitar & Bass Technical Discussion' started by ChazFromCali, Mar 21, 2015.

  1. ChazFromCali

    ChazFromCali Member

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    I have several off-brand necks that I've accumulated over the years. Decided I should try to do something useful with them rather than let them sit or throw them out. Most of them have a weird headstock shape but do have enough wood to make tele-style headstocks. I DL'd tele and strat paper templates to work off of but I don't have a clue about what tools to use to work the headstock to the desired shape.

    So my question is: What power tool would be best?

    I'm not a power tool kinda guy, don't know squat about them. What would be best for the quick & dirty to save time before the hand sanding into final shape? Low cost is a consideration. I'm not a luthier just want to refashion and save some necks I have laying around so they're not so retarded looking.

    Sorry if this is a basic dumbass question but I need an experienced opinion on the cheapest/best way to go about it.

    thanks,

    Chaz
     
  2. mike shaw

    mike shaw Member

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    If you don't feel comfortable with power tools - I'd use a rasp and some files. It will take a bit longer but you will have greater control of your progress as well as minimal chance of injury.
     
  3. FallsRockShop

    FallsRockShop Member

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    Ideally? Band saw and a drum sander attached to your drill press.

    As a hobby, some rasps and wood files followed up with some sandpaper. Maybe a handheld scroll or coping saw for major revisions.
     
  4. gwluthier

    gwluthier Member

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    I 'd agree with the rasp and sand , or a hand scroll saw.

    That being said I do a lot of shaping with a Dremel , but you have to be careful to get it even.
     
  5. poolshark

    poolshark Supporting Member

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    If cost is a consideration, coping saws are like seven bucks. A powered scroll saw would be better/faster, but the cheap saw will still do the job if you're careful. Just cut it close-but-safe, then dial the shape in with a file and some sandpaper. Unless the headstock is already close to your desired shape, sanding/rasping alone is going to cost you quite a bit more time and sawdust.
     
  6. Quarter

    Quarter Member

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    A coping saw would definitely be handy and cheap enough. For a scroll saw, check your local Craigs List. You can often find some great deals for little coin. You might even find an oscillating spindle sander too. The trick is watch for what you want and be ready to jump when the deals pop up.
     
  7. Astronaut FX

    Astronaut FX Member

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    Stand alone spindle sanders are relatively inexpensive and have small footprints. Since we're talking about removing small amounts of wood, this could be done with just a spindle sander and no bandsaw. Would just take a little longer.
     
  8. buddyboy69

    buddyboy69 Member

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  9. paulbearer

    paulbearer Supporting Member

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    I've used a hand jigsaw and orbital sander with good success.
    Clamp the neck firmly to a platform and you're gtg.
     
  10. K-Line

    K-Line Gold Supporting Member

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    This, a spindle sander. Get some 80 grit sleeves and 150 grit.
     

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