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Toontrack EZdrummer 2 vs. Superior Drummer 3

soundchaser59

Thank You Great Spirit!
Silver Supporting Member
Messages
12,516
2) SD3 has a feature where you can tap out a beat and SD3 will search through your library and find the MIDI beats most like what you tapped out. I use this extensively to find beats that match a riff I created. Way better than listening to a hundred MIDI beats to find one that matches what you are looking for.
I seriously need to start doing this, this would be a huge benefit for me. I have spent countless late night hours auditioning patterns, hoping to stumble on something that matches my original song riffs and chord progressions. Thanks for the reminder.
 

Billy Moss

Member
Messages
5,926
There are two key differences.

1) better midi Editor in SD3... May be a non issue if you're planning to MIDI exit in the DAW.

2) SD3 has a feature where you can tap out a beat and SD3 will search through your library and find the MIDI beats most like what you tapped out. I use this extensively to find beats that match a riff I created. Way better than listening to a hundred MIDI beats to find one that matches what you are looking for.
That's it?

Is the extra money for the George Massenburg touch on the drum mics worth the extra $250 for demo tracks?
 

Captngeetch

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
633
That's it?

Is the extra money for the George Massenburg touch on the drum mics worth the extra $250 for demo tracks?
Lol. No, that is not it. If you got to Toontrack you can get the details from the horses mouth.

Don’t take this the wrong way, but seriously, you’ve dragged this out much longer than I spent buying my Challenger Scatpack and that was out of state and a heck of a lot more than the software. Either you have no plan on buying either of them, or just like reading the same answers over and over.
I recommend you buy EZD. Superior will be a HUGE learning curve and way more than you need. It will confuse you and then you will be in here asking a million questions, still confused and not making music.

Mods need to close this thread already.Now go buy EZD and get back to recording...seriously
 

Freedom

Member
Messages
556
2) SD3 has a feature where you can tap out a beat and SD3 will search through your library and find the MIDI beats most like what you tapped out. I use this extensively to find beats that match a riff I created. Way better than listening to a hundred MIDI beats to find one that matches what you are looking for.
Isn't this the Tap2Find feature?



I think with the SD you can also edit (deep editing) the rhythms directly from the stand alone plugin (instead of only within the DAW, like the EZDrummer)...

I use the EZDrummer2 but the fact that I can't fine tune (edit individual hits, add, move, remove stuff etc.) from the standalone app itself, before I import it to the DAW makes me using it only for "demo" drum tracks really.
 

Billinder33

Member
Messages
1,574
Isn't this the Tap2Find feature?



I think with the SD you can also edit (deep editing) the rhythms directly from the stand alone plugin (instead of only within the DAW, like the EZDrummer)...

I use the EZDrummer2 but the fact that I can't fine tune (edit individual hits, add, move, remove stuff etc.) from the standalone app itself, before I import it to the DAW makes me using it only for "demo" drum tracks really.

I was not aware that they rolled this into EZD... a couple years back it was only available in SD.
 

Billinder33

Member
Messages
1,574
That's it?

Is the extra money for the George Massenburg touch on the drum mics worth the extra $250 for demo tracks?
The extra money is because SD has more and better sounding drum samples, more variation in the drums/kits, and the fact that SD has cross-talk between mics... which makes the kits sound more real.
 

Freedom

Member
Messages
556
I was not aware that they rolled this into EZD... a couple years back it was only available in SD.

No worries, I wasn't aware of it myself until only recently. I've used a couple of times, not a fan. I would prefer to just have the capability to edit or even make from scratch the beats from within the stand alone app instead.
 

Billinder33

Member
Messages
1,574
No worries, I wasn't aware of it myself until only recently. I've used a couple of times, not a fan. I would prefer to just have the capability to edit or even make from scratch the beats from within the stand alone app instead.
It's pretty useful if you have tons of 3rd party MIDI files and don't enjoy the minutia of programming drum beats. Some people are really good at punching out beats and fills from scratch. Me?... not so much. I can only wear so many hats.
 

Freedom

Member
Messages
556
It's pretty useful if you have tons of 3rd party MIDI files and don't enjoy the minutia of programming drum beats. Some people are really good at punching out beats and fills from scratch. Me?... not so much. I can only wear so many hats.

Naaah, I am more of a "spend some time to find your basic beats and then a lot of time to make them exactly as they should be (by editing them)", than doing everything from scratch.

I usually find a beat close enough to what I want for a part of a song, but it's almost never spot on and even if it were, I would have to change it just a little bit throughout a song just to spicy it up a bit and make it sound less robotic and "copy-pasted", if you will.

But that's alright...
 

makeitstop

Old dude with guitars
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
1,139
No worries, I wasn't aware of it myself until only recently. I've used a couple of times, not a fan. I would prefer to just have the capability to edit or even make from scratch the beats from within the stand alone app instead.
I use it to program songs with my Samplepad. I'll put together the rough beat, then add cymbal crashes, switch to ride cymbal for choruses, and do variations on fills so I don't have the same 2 or 3 fills repeating throughout the song. Then when I'm done putting the song together I save it out as a MIDI track to pull into my DAW.
 

Release

Member
Messages
1,482
I'm on the fence with buying SD3 and would like some advice.

Currently I use an older version of Addictive Drums and I've been trying out the EZ2 demo. I'm really digging' the song creator and the MIDI for generating ideas.

I play and record for fun and I create songs that almost always start off with a beat so that's where the song creator part is a BIG part of why I'm considering SD3. I find the variations a massive inspiration in all this.

The second part is I'm used to having much more control over the sound and mix but I really miss having the ability of editing the beats easily in the EZ2 demo. The big plus to SD3 is definitely about having the grid editor in there (so my drums are always live and I'm not jumping back and forth to edit in Logic). I'm not a big fan of the tiny interface in EZ though.

So the big question is.... I know EZ2 is much better at getting sounds immediately but how much work is really needed in SD3 to get a good sound fairly quickly? I know a fair amount of how to get drums to sound good in a mix but I'm not sure if I want to endlessly adjust things to get the drums to sound good on a song that.... if I'm being honest..... only me and a handful of friends will listen to? Is this something that I can create a preset and then apply it to different kits or would I need to do it on a kit by kit basis and then save the preset for each?

I'm almost certain that SD3 is the way to go but I want to be sure that tweaking each drum isn't going to kill the spontaneity of a session.
 

Billinder33

Member
Messages
1,574
how much work is really needed in SD3 to get a good sound fairly quickly? I know a fair amount of how to get drums to sound good in a mix but I'm not sure if I want to endlessly adjust things to get the drums to sound good...
None. It sounds great out of the box.

I have a 'base kit' that I created when I first got SD, that took a couple of hours of just auditioning all the individual drums to create my 'optimal' kit... This is my default kit and starting point for most things. Then I swap drums on this kit once a song is starting to form to see if deviating from that base kit improves the feel of the song. That all happens pretty quickly because swapping drums in SD is just an ready drop-down menu.

I often change drum sounds from song to song, but usually just by auditioning the individual drums on SD until I find one that I think is appropriate for the song. Occasionally I'll tweak the transient to get a little more 'punch' or 'click' if I want it, rarely do more tweaking than that.

Just because you can tweak something endlessly doesn't mean you should. No reason to in SD3.
 

drfrankencopter

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,159
That's it?

Is the extra money for the George Massenburg touch on the drum mics worth the extra $250 for demo tracks?
For demos, I’d say no. You get going faster with EZD. Shorter learning curve, and more production ready sounds. You can’t get as “tweaky” with EZD, but that’s probably not what you want at this phase.

I’d highly recommend you just pick up EZD, get to know it and when you find that it’s limitatations are showing, then consider the upgrade.
 

tazzboy

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,925
I've narrowed to Superior Drummer 3. I am just waiting for a bargain or sale to get it.
 

subtomic

Member
Messages
360
Anyone here tried the free MT Power Drum Kit by Manda and later upgraded to Superior Drummer? I’ve been using the former for demos and have found it quite easy to use (I’m pretty good with using Reaper’s MIDI roll), but my wife and I are eager to start making more professional sounding recordings. So I’m thinking of upgrading to Superior Drummer, but if it’s significantly more complicated, then I might delay.
 

Release

Member
Messages
1,482
None. It sounds great out of the box.

I have a 'base kit' that I created when I first got SD, that took a couple of hours of just auditioning all the individual drums to create my 'optimal' kit... This is my default kit and starting point for most things. Then I swap drums on this kit once a song is starting to form to see if deviating from that base kit improves the feel of the song. That all happens pretty quickly because swapping drums in SD is just an ready drop-down menu.

I often change drum sounds from song to song, but usually just by auditioning the individual drums on SD until I find one that I think is appropriate for the song. Occasionally I'll tweak the transient to get a little more 'punch' or 'click' if I want it, rarely do more tweaking than that.

Just because you can tweak something endlessly doesn't mean you should. No reason to in SD3.
Thanks!! I bought I today and have been playing around a bit. It sounds AMAZING and it's nowhere near as daunting as I expected. It's light years beyond any other drum plug-in that I've tried. Just amazing!
 

smallbutmighty

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
9,093
Honestly, whatever you decide.... sometimes just taking action is better than 'paralysis by analysis'.... which is what you're suffering through right now. I've been there, so I do understand. The only wrong decision is taking months to decide, when you could be making music instead.
If you choose not to decided you still have made a choice...
 




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