Top secret SS frets at Warmoth

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by Aardvark, Oct 17, 2008.

  1. Aardvark

    Aardvark Silver Supporting Member

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    I recently ordered a neck with SS frets from Warmoth. I began to wonder if they still used Jescar fretwire from Germany, as they supposedly did in the past. I asked the manager, who flatly told me that he could not tell me, as the information was proprietary. I responded by telling him I just wanted to know what I was purchasing and that other luthiers had no qualms about revealing the same information. I don't think waterboarding would get the answer out of him. Does anyone here happen to know the answer? Thanks.
     
  2. buckwild

    buckwild Silver Supporting Member

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    I've bought many warmoth necks and bodies in the past but this is the kind of stuff that just pisses me off. They can be such dorks on the phone. They should be able to provide the answer. ... sorry for the rant
     
  3. jeo_tokai

    jeo_tokai Member

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    Maybe there is no pride where they are sourcing it. Basically if it will up there sales margins they will put or say where its from. Now this is the reverse.
     
  4. fullerplast

    fullerplast Senior Member

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    That's a pretty standard response for any company in a competitive environment. Lots of companies won't tell you where they source particular components. A luthier doing refrets or custom work is in an entirely different environment so would not have the same concerns.

    IIRC, Anderson used to source their SS fretwire from Warmoth when they started using SS.
     
  5. Eagle1

    Eagle1 Member

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  6. empty71

    empty71 Member

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    I doubt Warmoth uses Jescar stainless steel fretwire. Their stainless steel fretwire was much "softer" and easier to work with than the stainless steel fretwire used by other guitar builders/manufacturers.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2008
  7. Eagle1

    Eagle1 Member

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    "Who " almost no one makes it .
    And it's softer than Parker's but so is everything else.
    So Jescar, Allparts and ?
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2008
  8. bluesjunior

    bluesjunior Member

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    Stainless steel is what it is. I can't see there being soft-medium-hard guages. I could imagine however there being some sort of alloy blended into stainless steel in order to facilitate easier working but then would it be stainless steel anymore?.
     
  9. Eagle1

    Eagle1 Member

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    You can raise the hardness significantly by working it,or during the rolling process.
     
  10. rkchkr

    rkchkr Member

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    When I called Jescar to find out where I could buy enough of thier wire for 1 refret ,they suggested Warmoth and I believe Allparts...and another that I can't remember. When I called Warmoth to ask if they sold Jescar ,I got "duhhhh.........I dunno whos wire it is." I bought it....seems ok to me...actually was enough for 2 refrets. This was back in August.
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2008
  11. empty71

    empty71 Member

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    I edited my post :D What I'd meant was the Warmoth SS fretwire I'd worked on was easier to work with compared to the USACG and Suhr SS fretwire I've worked on :) Hope this clarifies :)
     
  12. Wayniac

    Wayniac Member

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    There are many grades of stainless...
     
  13. daddyo

    daddyo Guest

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    Dude, you asked for it:D
    • 100 Series—austenitic chromium-nickel-manganese alloys
      • Type 101—austenitic that is hardenable through cold working for furniture
      • Type 102—austenitic general purpose stainless steel working for furniture
    • 200 Series—austenitic chromium-nickel-manganese alloys
      • Type 201—austenitic that is hardenable through cold working
      • Type 202—austenitic general purpose stainless steel
    • 300 Series—austenitic chromium-nickel alloys
      • Type 301—highly ductile, for formed products. Also hardens rapidly during mechanical working. Good weldability. Better wear resistance and fatigue strength than 304.
      • Type 302—same corrosion resistance as 304, with slightly higher strength due to additional carbon.
      • Type 303—free machining version of 304 via addition of sulfur and phosphorus. Also referred to as "A1" in accordance with ISO 3506.[9]
      • Type 304—the most common grade; the classic 18/8 stainless steel. Also referred to as "A2" in accordance with ISO 3506.[9]
      • Type 304L— same as the 304 grade but contains less carbon to increase weldability. Is slightly weaker than 304.
      • Type 304LN—same as 304L, but also nitrogen is added to obtain a much higher yield and tensile strength than 304L.
      • Type 308—used as the filler metal when welding 304
      • Type 309—better temperature resistance than 304, also sometimes used as filler metal when welding dissimilar steels, along with inconel.
      • Type 316—the second most common grade (after 304); for food and surgical stainless steel uses; alloy addition of molybdenum prevents specific forms of corrosion. It is also known as marine grade stainless steel due to its increased resistance to chloride corrosion compared to type 304. 316 is often used for building nuclear reprocessing plants. Most watches that are made of stainless steel are made of Type 316L. Also referred to as "A4" in accordance with ISO 3506.[9] 316Ti includes titanium for heat resistance, therefore it is used in flexible chimney liners.
      • Type 321—similar to 304 but lower risk of weld decay due to addition of titanium. See also 347 with addition of niobium for desensitization during welding.
    • 400 Series—ferritic and martensitic chromium alloys
      • Type 405— ferritic for welding applications
      • Type 408—heat-resistant; poor corrosion resistance; 11% chromium, 8% nickel.
      • Type 409—cheapest type; used for automobile exhausts; ferritic (iron/chromium only).
      • Type 410—martensitic (high-strength iron/chromium). Wear-resistant, but less corrosion-resistant.
      • Type 416—easy to machine due to additional sulfur
      • Type 420—Cutlery Grade martensitic; similar to the Brearley's original rustless steel. Excellent polishability.
      • Type 430—decorative, e.g., for automotive trim; ferritic. Good formability, but with reduced temperature and corrosion resistance.
      • Type 440—a higher grade of cutlery steel, with more carbon, allowing for much better edge retention when properly heat-treated. It can be hardened to approximately Rockwell 58 hardness, making it one of the hardest stainless steels. Due to its toughness and relatively low cost, most display-only and replica swords or knives are made of 440 stainless. Also known as razor blade steel. Available in four grades: 440A, 440B, 440C, and the uncommon 440F (free machinable). 440A, having the least amount of carbon in it, is the most stain-resistant; 440C, having the most, is the strongest and is usually considered more desirable in knifemaking than 440A, except for diving or other salt-water applications.
      • Type 446—For elevated temperature service
    • 500 Series—heat-resisting chromium alloys
    • 600 Series—martensitic precipitation hardening alloys
      • 601 through 604: Martensitic low-alloy steels.
      • 610 through 613: Martensitic secondary hardening steels.
      • 614 through 619: Martensitic chromium steels.
      • 630 through 635: Semiaustenitic and martensitic precipitation-hardening stainless steels.
        • Type 630 is most common PH stainless, better known as 17-4; 17% chromium, 4% nickel.
      • 650 through 653: Austenitic steels strengthened by hot/cold work.
      • 660 through 665: Austenitic superalloys; all grades except alloy 661 are strengthened by second-phase precipitation.
    • Type 2205— the most widely used duplex (ferritic/austenitic) stainless steel grade. It has both excellent corrosion resistance and high strength.
     
  14. Aardvark

    Aardvark Silver Supporting Member

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    Wow, thanks for all the replies. Very helpful. Daddyo, that's enough data to choke a goat, but that's good.
     
  15. soulohio

    soulohio Member

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    goatchoke...the name of a band there...methinks
     
  16. Boris Bubbanov

    Boris Bubbanov Member

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    I respectfully disagree.

    There are so many different types of stainless; I can't begin to keep track of all of them. Stainless is by definition an alloy.

    Nevermind, daddyo has got us covered, whew!
     
  17. Zero

    Zero Member

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    Ha! As if Warmoth sales persons know anything.
     
  18. Aardvark

    Aardvark Silver Supporting Member

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    It does have a nice ring to it, maybe for a death metal band.
     

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