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Treble bleed circuit - alertnative?

ajmxbend

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
55
As an alternative to a installing a treble bleed circuit, why not install a tone pot with a higher value. For example, for a strat with single coils, use a 500K tone pot(s) and turn them up when turning down the volume knob? On the flip side just turn the tone pots down when turning the volume pot up?
 

cap10kirk

Member
Messages
9,133
Because having to turn 2 pots instead of just one sucks, especially if you play gigs. And replacing a 250k tone pot with a 500k pot doesn't make that much of a difference ime.
50s wiring retains some high end when you roll down the volume, and I prefer it over a treble bleed. It does change the way the volume and tone controls interact with each other, which you may or may not like.
 

Major Fuzz

Member
Messages
146
This was recommended to me what I asked the same question. I tried it on a strat and it REALLY helped. It's nice having several different types of circuits to choose between. They make an SRV one too which caters more towards those tones. Not sure how they'd sound in a non-strat type guitar, that might be interesting
 

KenG

Member
Messages
1,505
Treble bled uses a capacitor (and sometimes resistor) to create a lower impedance path for high frequencies across the volume pot input and wiper. Putting in a higher pot is not an equivalent. Pure resistance has no impedance characteristics with frequency. The higher value simply presents a lower DC load (higher resistance) across your pickup so weaker signals in the high end don't get swamped out. The minute you start turning down the volume you're back to square one. You can buy expensive treble bleed circuits that are potted as a single component from say Fender but they are like $50`when the equivalent cap and resistor are pennies each but trickier to wire in as neatly.
 

Strummerfan

Member
Messages
5,213
Not a fan of treble bleeds. I prefer the way the the tone and volume interact without them. Set your amp so that you are getting decent breakup when the guitars volume is topped. Then roll back your volume to where it's fairly clean, and your tone to where it's nice and warm. When lead time comes, crank the guitar volume, you get some dirt and a bit of extra treble to cut through from the one knob change.
 

bonga

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
486
Hey folks, I have a fairly basic question about treble bleed and was hoping to get an answer.

To the OP, sorry I don't mean to hijack your thread!

Does having or not having a treble bleed have any influence on the tone when both volume and tone are at 10 on the guitar?
 
Messages
637
Hey folks, I have a fairly basic question about treble bleed and was hoping to get an answer.

To the OP, sorry I don't mean to hijack your thread!

Does having or not having a treble bleed have any influence on the tone when both volume and tone are at 10 on the guitar?

No. The treble bleed connects between the wiper and the pickup pins of the volume pot. When volume is on 10, those two points are connected.

I have a treble bleed on my strat-style. I love it. I still keep my volume on 10 basically all the time (why would I want to be quieter?), but now if I roll volume off at least it still sounds good.
 

ajmxbend

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
55
What drawback does the treble bleed have that you're trying to get around?
No treble bleed drawbacks for me. I was wiring up a new partscaster yesterday and thought that the 500K tone pot idea might be another option and wanted to get TGP's opinion. I should have mentioned this in my post sorry.
 




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