trey anastasio good times bad times HELP

Heady Jam Fan

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Trey often, especially on Junta, uses a lot of atonal music. I forget the tune at the moment, but it whole tone with a Looney Toons tease! He switches it up a lot in this solo, the beginning is the most dissonant and chromatic I believe, but I would have to get out my guitar and learn this solo to say exactly.

Split open is a sweet tune too, but I gotta say, I think I like him playing Zeppelin more. Split open is very dissonant too, I think I hear a lot of chromatic runs with flat 5ths, but I would need to get my guitar again, maybe I will come back when I get a chance and add more. I think there is a good split open tab somewhere if you can take time to figure out the modes and scales as you learn it (I used to spend hours on that as a kid).
 

zestystrat

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I didn't listen to the whole solo but at around 5:00 they were in Tension land....I'll explain:

There is an article out there w/ Trey from one of the gtr rags that talks about "Tension land" and "Release land", that will help. It talks about Stash specifically IIRC, but the concept is what you are after.

It's not only the scales he's playing it's the context that Mike and Page are putting those phrases in.

It's a good read even if you don't apply it. Post the link when you find it or maybe someone else will.

Oh and what kind of Phan would I be if I didn't say thank You, Mr. Minor.
 

cram

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13,712
sweet tweezer reprise at the end there!
I had forgotten about this one. They used to play it a lot.

There's a TGP member that reviewed and demoed the in and out tension feeling that trey used on tunes and jams during that era. My google search for it came up empty, but it's a great video if you can find it.
 

Jeremy_Green

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He's mostly using natural (aeolian) and dorian minor for adding notes to a pentatonic framework. Meaning he is mostly using pentatonic minor but when he ads extra notes they are coming from one of those sources often. That's the short answer because he is slip sliding in and out with chromatic stuff.
 

Heady Jam Fan

Member
Messages
9,015
I didn't listen to the whole solo but at around 5:00 they were in Tension land....I'll explain:

There is an article out there w/ Trey from one of the gtr rags that talks about "Tension land" and "Release land", that will help. It talks about Stash specifically IIRC, but the concept is what you are after.

It's not only the scales he's playing it's the context that Mike and Page are putting those phrases in.

It's a good read even if you don't apply it. Post the link when you find it or maybe someone else will.

Oh and what kind of Phan would I be if I didn't say thank You, Mr. Minor.
Yea, definitely Mike and Page's phrasing changes along with Trey's in both examples OP posted.

He's mostly using natural (aeolian) and dorian minor for adding notes to a pentatonic framework. Meaning he is mostly using pentatonic minor but when he ads extra notes they are coming from one of those sources often. That's the short answer because he is slip sliding in and out with chromatic stuff.
aeolian and dorian are separate from chromatic, the difference between the two modes is mostly the flat 6th. They both add the 2 to the scale. Chromatic also adds a flat 2, flat 4, flat 4, and sharp 7.
 

2Slick4U

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Just a peeve and I know I'm straying off topic a bit, but it seems like he does the tap-dancing thing way too often on a song that really doesn't have any noticeable changes in tone?
 

thesauce

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I think one important facet of this style is the ability to incorporate different scales into one line. For example, creating an idea that incorprates phyrigian, minor pentatonic and diminished chord tones into the same line. This is a great way to create 'pull' in your lines and add harmonic movement where there may not be a very dynamic progression playing beneath you.

The whole tension/release thing is often built around floating on a diminished chord and voice leading back to tonic.
 

Heady Jam Fan

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9,015
I think one important facet of this style is the ability to incorporate different scales into one line. For example, creating an idea that incorprates phyrigian, minor pentatonic and diminished chord tones into the same line. This is a great way to create 'pull' in your lines and add harmonic movement where there may not be a very dynamic progression playing beneath you.

The whole tension/release thing is often built around floating on a diminished chord and voice leading back to tonic.
Right - I think he often emphasizes the flatted fifth, which would be your diminished chords. The Phrygian adds the flat 2 (or 9), which is cool, almost arabian sounding to me for some reason. I guess your response is more helpful at suggesting specific colors rather than chromatic, as that includes a few other colors that Trey doesn't emphasize as much.
 

Jeremy_Green

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1,142
aeolian and dorian are separate from chromatic, the difference between the two modes is mostly the flat 6th. They both add the 2 to the scale. Chromatic also adds a flat 2, flat 4, flat 4, and sharp 7.
I didn't say or imply aeolian or dorian were chromatic.
Of course they are different.
 

78deluxe

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5,355
Starting around 5:00 Trey starts improvising with modes (I guess). I am pretty new to modes, so could you guys give me some insight as to what he is doing here?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ousFDjPrh58

pretty rockin solo too eh? gotta love phish

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AQ3qj1ethFE

seems to be doing similar things on this tune too. hopefully some jammers can help me out here.

Thanks in advance guys
John
Without clicking on the link, I'm sure this has got to be a question about 10-21-1995 into Tweezer Reprise.

Can't help with the modes
 




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