Triads all over the neck

Discussion in 'Playing and Technique' started by drummondrs, Jun 18, 2006.

  1. drummondrs

    drummondrs Member

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    Just wondering, how does it benefit you knowing all the triads and inversions all over the neck?
     
  2. Super Locrian

    Super Locrian Member

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    You can easily impress girls at parties. :D
     
  3. Kappy

    Kappy Member

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    You'll have something to play for your mother.
     
  4. K-man

    K-man Member

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    You'll be able to play any chord and stay in one position on the neck. Ditto for playing chord tones during your solos.
     
  5. NeuroLogic

    NeuroLogic Supporting Member

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    This is one of several valuable soloing tools. Look at Larry Carlton's video to see how some of the best guitar soloing ever was put together w/ triads. Triads are one of the essential components of music. As w/ all components, it is a good idea to know how to play them everywhere on the fingerboard.
     
  6. Dana

    Dana Guest

    I spit my coffee all over the monitor when I read that comment! :rotflmao

    Seriously, there are probably a thousand reasons for why this would improve your playing. One would be that you could grab any chord at any time anywhere on the neck. The other is to improve soloing possibilites. The sound of the triad is so strong it makes it invaluable to know inside and out.

    I believe Tomo has discussed the importance of using triads in many of his posts. You may want to do a search.

    I apologize if this sounds a little Zen, but it's sort of something you have to work on and discover why it's important for yourself. People can give you dozens of reasons why you should learn them, but until you spend time working them out yourself you want fully understand the benefits.

    The good thing is, it won't make your playing any worse by working on them.

    Good luck.
     
  7. Super Locrian

    Super Locrian Member

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    (Edit: it seems the post I was replying to has been deleted)

    G triad: G B D

    C maj7: C E G B
    C maj9: C E G B D

    A7: A C# E G
    A9: A C# E G B
    A11: A C# E G B D

    As you can see, the simple G triad functions differently over a C maj7 or A7 chord - it extends the harmony, actually turning the C maj7 into a C maj9, and the A7 into an A11 chord. It's an old jazz device, and a great way of creating interesting harmonies with just a few resources (major, minor, diminished and altered triads).
     
  8. Pedro58

    Pedro58 Supporting Member

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    If you play slide in standard tuning, triads really help you find notes close together. Even better, knowing your triads can help you "find" the note you're hearing in your head, and find it anywhere quickly. You'll know intervals better by learning triads... Some of this is true for standard playing, too. YMMV! But, like someone already pointed out, it can't hurt your playing.
     
  9. lhallam

    lhallam Member

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    Very advisable.

    1 - You will know your neck better
    2 - extremely useful in 2 gtr, keyboard or big band ensembles
    3 - will not only help your rhythm playing but open up more possibilities during solos
    4 - easier to play more like a pianist with such things as passing chords
    5- they sound really cool
    6 - they sound really cool

    Did I mention that they sound really cool?
     
  10. mavrick10_2000

    mavrick10_2000 Member

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    +1 to what everyone has said thus far.

    I've been working on triads quite a bit lately, and it's opened up so many more tonal options for me. From a soloing perspective you can use triads to work in front of the beat, behind it and all points in between.
     
  11. Tomo

    Tomo Member

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    For freedom.

    Tomo
     
  12. PGTrio

    PGTrio Member

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    For expanding possibilities...


    I should've just said... yeah!
     
  13. Antero

    Antero Member

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    :dude
     
  14. WahmBoomAh

    WahmBoomAh World Crass Guitarist Silver Supporting Member

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    One step closer to closing your eyes and playing ...impress the girls AND the guys !
     
  15. KRosser

    KRosser Member

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    It doesn't matter if you never use them - it will help you understand the geography of the fingerboard and the harmonic & melodic relationships anywhere.

    In other words, what Tomo said....
     
  16. gtrchris

    gtrchris Member

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    My teacher introduced me to Johnny Smith's books way, way back, and the first thing we covered were triads(major,minor,aug,dim.) in root position,1st and 2nd inversions-close voicings on each group of three adjacent strings. i.e. 6-5-4, 5-4-3, 4-3-2, 3-2-1
    This was the beginning for me of seeing the fingerboard in a new light.
    L.Carlton and S.Henderson always talk about using triads-Carlton is the master of superimposing different triads over standard chords to add colour in his solos.
    This can be taken to the next level by voicing the triads on non-adjacent strings-open voicings
    If you want to take it to the highest level, buy the MelBay series, Harmonic Mechanisms for Guitar by George Van Eps-totally enlightening exploration of solo guitar playing (or should I say lap piano);)
     
  17. clothwiring

    clothwiring Supporting Member

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    At the very least learn the CAGED system...then build from there. I find that often times I just change the chords up the neck if I'm playing with another guitar player, fills the song out a little more.
     
  18. Vashin

    Vashin Member

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    Hi, could anyone reccomend a good web resource to learn triads all over the neck? Thanks
     
  19. gennation

    gennation Member

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    It's not on a webpage, but a goldmine of how triads are form ALL OVER the fretboard is found in the book Chord Chemistry by Ted Greene.

    It's usually under $10 from amazon.com

    Plus you are going to learn how to use them.

    Get it, this book is a legend.
     
  20. Tomo

    Tomo Member

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    You don't have to buy anything!

    Where is my "Triad thread" ?


    Tomo
     

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