trick to soldering patch cables with braided shield?

Discussion in 'Effects, Pedals, Strings & Things' started by Tonecap, Feb 15, 2012.

  1. Tonecap

    Tonecap Member

    Messages:
    347
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2009
    I'm trying to make my own patch cables using GLS pancake plugs and gepco xb20ub cable. My problem is the gepco has two layers of braided shield which by the time you separate and twist together, is the equivalent to 12 gauge wire! What is the trick to working around this? Do you just trim away the excess until your down to a managable 20 gauge consistency. I hate to cut off part of the shield but I'm not seeing any way around it. I guess the good news is its braided so even the part that gets trimmed at the end is electrically woven with the part that is being soldered. Any help is much appreciated. Thanks
     
  2. tdk8709

    tdk8709 Senior Member

    Messages:
    961
    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2011
    Location:
    Southern Illinois
    Trim it up. Canare is braided as well, and is massive once you twist it together. Trim just enough to make it manageable.
     
  3. jnepo1

    jnepo1 Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    13,218
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2009
    Location:
    Sutton, MA
    The Gepco X is a thick cable, when you tighten down the GLS pancake plug's cover, don't overtighten, you may short it out. I personally don't use the Gepco w/ pancake plugs because of this.

    As for the braided shielding, I un-weave the strands and then twist it all-together then tin the wires from tip to were all the shielding meets the body of the cable. Once tinned, it just a matter of soldering to the lead.
     
  4. Tonecap

    Tonecap Member

    Messages:
    347
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2009
  5. Tonecap

    Tonecap Member

    Messages:
    347
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2009
    A bit of an update. I tried the fold back method but it ended up being too bulky. Not a bad idea, but just didn't work with the cable I was using. I did however figure out a little trick that I thought I would pass along. Instead of twisting together a smaller portion of the braid and cutting off the excess I left it all in tack and twisted the whole thing together. If you work it right you can get it down to about a 14 gauge diameter. Then comes the trick. I used a toe nail clipper and angled it across the twisted braid essentially creating a taper that left me about the same diameter on the end of the taper to solder as if I was to trim off half using the old method. However, this way when you tin the tapered wire you are fusing the whole shield instead of just part of it. I'm sure this is old news for some but just wanting to say that toe nail clippers work really well and precise. Better than what I could get outta my snips, which were probably a little dull to begin with.
     
  6. Goodwood Audio

    Goodwood Audio Member

    Messages:
    1,463
    Joined:
    Apr 8, 2008
    Location:
    Australia
    Have you ever had any short out?
    My colleague has made a heap with the same cable as the OP with no issues at all.
    We like how the plug is tight around the cable - to provide some strain relief.
     
  7. dick wiewy

    dick wiewy Member

    Messages:
    343
    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2005
    Location:
    Vacuum Tube Valley, Califas
    What works for me is to gently enlarge an area of the braid an inch or so from the end to create a spread out hole to drag the center conductor through (with it's insulation intact). Grasping the end of the still braided shield I tug it so it collapses like "Chinese Finger Cuffs". I can make that a smaller bundle than I can make a shield by rolling it up the typical way one preps wire for tinning.

    If I've got an impossibly tiny eyelet to fit the bundle through I've mechanically attached a resistor lead trimming to the wire bundle. I try and avoid this fidgety work
    if at all possible. I suspect it wouldn't pass NASA scrutiny for one reason. The other
    being time is precious.

    [​IMG]
     

Share This Page