Tru oil, when is it dry?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Guitar & Bass Technical Discussion' started by lespaulnmarshall, May 19, 2015.

  1. lespaulnmarshall

    lespaulnmarshall Member

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    Hi, I'm finishing a neck in tru oil.
    It's been about 2 hours since I applied the first coat of oil and I carefully touched it, it feels pretty much dry. I heared people wait about 24 hours before applying the next coat. since it already frels dry, should I reapply the oil? Or should I really wait 24 hours?
    Or do you think I could use some steel wool on it now already?
    Thanks,
    Maurice
     
  2. John Coloccia

    John Coloccia Cold Supporting Member

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    Wait. It needs time to cure and for any solvent to out gas. If you get too aggressive and impatient, you'll just make the process take longer until it's actually fully cured. I usually do a very light coat every day until I'm happy, usually just applied with a small square of cloth. Very very light coats is what I do, which I think is completely the opposite of what they recommend. I also don't generally sand between coats. That's just my own process, though.
     
  3. lespaulnmarshall

    lespaulnmarshall Member

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  4. ajeffcote

    ajeffcote Member

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    I do it a little differently. I put the first couple of coats on pretty heavy and let the wood drink it up. About the third coat it's starting to build up. Now if I want a gloss finish I go to the light coat way of thinking but I do maybe 3 a day.
    I think TO really excels at a satin finish. When it starts to build I stop and let it dry for a couple of days. Then level any build_up with steel wool, scotchbrite or a fine grit sanding pad. After that I polish with a fine cut compound and it's done. And that gives the best feeling neck you can get with a finish. Start to finish about 3 days.
     
  5. Quarter

    Quarter Member

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    With optimum conditions and light coats, you can recoat in a couple hours. I would not recommend any more than 3 coats a day and to be on the safe side, 2 is a better target. You don't need to sand or wool between every coat. I generally do any leveling in the morning before that days coats. Once I get a nice film built, I generally then let it cure for a week or so before any final polishing. Lots of good info in this old TGP thread here http://www.thegearpage.net/board/in...-get-a-high-gloss-from-tru-oil-finish.711780/

    Here is a recent Tru Oil project on some limba.

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  6. Ronsonic

    Ronsonic Member

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    More beautiful work, Tom. What did you use as a filler on that?
     
  7. Quarter

    Quarter Member

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    Thanks! I used BC's own Sealer Filler on that one. I did a little light dye / shading strait to the wood, so I wanted something clear that did not need a lot of aggressive initial sanding. Its not a "perfect" filler. It takes multiple coats, has some shrink back, though is pretty stable after a week or so. For this project though, I felt was a good choice.
     
  8. John Coloccia

    John Coloccia Cold Supporting Member

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    How do you do the final polish/buffing. I've never had much luck getting high gloss. It seems too soft, but people do it.
     
  9. Quarter

    Quarter Member

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    Part of the "trick" is to not have to do much, if any level sanding at the end. Because Tru Oil does not burn in, and goes on thin, I started thinking about the process as a level as you go exercise.

    I build the body of the film by wiping it on and then lightly wet sand with some 1000 grit every 3 - 4 coats to knock the tops down. At some point, the shiny low spots disappear and then I switch to spraying the last couple coats. For the spray sessions, I thin the Tru Oil with a little mineral spirits, maybe 10% and spray one wet coat in the morning, let dry overnight, and then lightly wet sand the next morning with some 1500, spray the last coat and let cure for a week or more.

    If I've done a good job of building a good and level film, I can just give it a hit and miss for any minor issues with some 2000 or micro mesh and go straight to polish with some Meguiars #9 and a Stewmac foam pad on a drill motor.

    Here is a body about 20 min after the last sprayed coat. The little dash of mineral spirits helps it flow out nice.

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  10. FuzzyAce

    FuzzyAce Member

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    Fantastic builds Tom P.! Love your detail and wood choices. Thanks for the inspiration.
    :beer
     

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