True Fire: how is it not more popular?

s2y

Member
Messages
19,526
I've been working on a back to basics approach and have been using True Fire lessons. I checked out a few last year and bought a bunch while they were on sale during the holidays. Sure, they're not as good as a teacher, but they tend to be ~$20-30 (downloads) for a heck of a lot of material. I recall paying a lot more for rock star VHS lessons back in the day, most were a tad more expensive and a few of them didn't really have much educational content.

Man, I would have killed for this kind of content when I was single and still had free time. Yet, I ask bassists and guitarists that I know and nobody has heard of it. :dunno
 

stevel

Member
Messages
14,928
It's not more popular because it's not more free!

In this day and age, there are so many free resources that people just go to them - even if you do only "get what you pay for", for many, this is more than enough.

It's also too easy to ckick away as soon as any kind of fee is mentioned.

And I got to put gas in the car! $20...really, too rich for my blood - people's disposable income has dried (or is drying) up. SO even if they had heard of it, they still not buy into it.

To be honest, I find a lot of this stuff to be a "no man's land" - it's often too difficult for beginners, and too easy (or maybe, esoteric, uninteresting, etc.) to more advanced players. So it's hard to find that market it appeals to and is useful for - I think the VHS and DVD market had the same issue - what sold those were the players - Eric Johnson - every player I knew had that one (except me becuase even back then $20 was too much to come by - had to by cables and strings and batteries, and put gas in the car). The "guitar hero" is a bit harder to come by - they've fallen into more of a "niche" genre than ever before. And then - Larry Carlton - great - but no offense, no one had really heard of him even when he was actually marginally known. Nowadays, forget about it. The market now makes players like him only interesting to a very specific audience. Maybe if they had John Mayer. I bet an Orianthi series would cause their servers to crash. But there are a lot of "names you'd only know if you were into it" type players - believe it or not, Robben Ford is not really all that well known outside of a very specific guitar community. I know who Jennifer Batten is but I bet very few people younger than me do. The great Andy Aledort has been doing this for decades, but again, the market's moved away from the "guitar god". Jeff Mc, David Hamburger et a; - some TGP posters and contributors, and outstanding players and instructors - but no offense, not exactly household names.

So despite the quality, the marketability is an uphill climb.

Steve
 

s2y

Member
Messages
19,526
Based on all the NGD, NAD, and new boutique pedal threads, I'd venture to guess that most guys can spring for $20. Most of us probably took lessons at the equiv of $20 per 1/2 hour. During their holiday sales, some ~3 hour lessons were $11.

I haven't had time to view all levels of lessons. I believe that even the easy stuff should be revisited from time to time. If it's that easy, one should be able to play it perfectly rather quickly.
 

scorched

Member
Messages
275
My problem with Truefire is their broken website that won't let me buy the product.

I tried around Thanksgiving and again around Christmas and I would have stuff in the cart and try to pay and their webpage would just hang. I bought stuff from more than 25 different websites around Christmas and only had problems with theirs.

Plus, their tech support is only business hours which is when I work to pay for things so I can't get any help.

So, I take my business elsewhere.
 

mastercaster

Member
Messages
368
They are starting to have some of the better country courses available. And not just modern chicken pickin courses like everybody else, but courses on classic country and western swing. Rockabilly, Bluegrass and Travis Picking also.
That won me over.
 
Messages
2,906
My problem with Truefire is their broken website that won't let me buy the product.

I tried around Thanksgiving and again around Christmas and I would have stuff in the cart and try to pay and their webpage would just hang. I bought stuff from more than 25 different websites around Christmas and only had problems with theirs.

Plus, their tech support is only business hours which is when I work to pay for things so I can't get any help.

So, I take my business elsewhere.
Too bad, Truefire has very good customer service. If you had spoken to them they likely would have made it right.

As far as the quality of their lessons, Truefire has done a great job of evolving with the available technology and adding talented instructors.

It's true they aren't going to appeal to someone looking for free lessons but they provide a great bang for a buck especially with their many sales and promos.
 

boo radley

Member
Messages
2,201
I'm a huge TrueFire evangelist, and bought a year membership a couple months ago. I agree -- they should be huge. IMO only, the quality of the instruction is generally superb from both a technical and educational angle.

Obviously some courses are better than others, but...there's a LOT out there. I especially like the formats for some of the courses where they break songs into interesting rhythm parts, and then a solo or two that's appropriate over the rhythm.
 

s2y

Member
Messages
19,526
My problem with Truefire is their broken website that won't let me buy the product.

I tried around Thanksgiving and again around Christmas and I would have stuff in the cart and try to pay and their webpage would just hang. I bought stuff from more than 25 different websites around Christmas and only had problems with theirs.

Plus, their tech support is only business hours which is when I work to pay for things so I can't get any help.

So, I take my business elsewhere.
Definitely not the case when I was buying stuff over the holidays. I kept buying stuff and it kept working, perhaps a little too well because they kept roping me in with deals.
 

weshunter

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
6,269
The membership is such a good deal that it's hard to pass up. It's also the country stuff that makes it worth it for me. Once i get all that down I'll probably drop it.
 

Sound_Drift

Member
Messages
389
I buy a fair amount of instructional material, books, pdfs, dvds and for some reason I just don't find much at TrueFire that particularly pushes me to want to buy. I would like to see more theory or concept videos or perhaps more niche-related topics. Somehow, I'm sure the broad approach works for them, but to spend my $, I just am not seeing topics that I would like to buy. I've found over the years that if I say buy a book on using "Triad Pairs"- it will get more longterm mileage than a pile of sweeping exercises.
 

s2y

Member
Messages
19,526
The membership is such a good deal that it's hard to pass up. It's also the country stuff that makes it worth it for me. Once i get all that down I'll probably drop it.
I might give that a shot if my new work schedule allows for more consistent practicing. In the mean time, I have a lot of $11 lessons to keep me busy for quite a while.
 

dsharp

Member
Messages
9
Interesting. I've been a TrueFire member for a couple of years and I just assumed it was popular. I like the format and it's worth it to me to be a member so I can have lessons at the ready when I have the time and motivation to tackle something new.
 

GLB98

Member
Messages
395
Interesting. I've been a TrueFire member for a couple of years and I just assumed it was popular. I like the format and it's worth it to me to be a member so I can have lessons at the ready when I have the time and motivation to tackle something new.
I quite like Truefire, and have purchased a lot of courses, but I don't much care for the membership thing. Firstly I like to own things, and be able to access them forever without subscription $. More importantly the interface just works a lot better on one's local computer vs. streaming over the web.

Of course the membership gives one access to more material, but I'm not even sure that is a good thing. I think that more dedicated focus on fewer things is better, for me anyway. I think you could take any 2 or 3 Truefire courses and if you really applied yourself to getting the most out of them, you would keep yourself busy for a long time.
 

Hotspur

Member
Messages
375
I feel a little like Truefire occupies a strange middle ground. You pay per lesson but also there's a membership fee?

Jamplay is an all-you-can eat buffet while you are paying the membership fee. It seems like Truefire wants you to pay twice. That kind of rubs me the wrong way. (Although the absence of clear pricing information on their home page is something I also dislike).
 
Messages
1,017
I would agree its the money. There are a couple of instructors/courses on there I would LOVE to take lessons from and even though it is likely better instruction at a lower price than I could get locally or from other places coughing up the money for it is tough even if it is not a large amount. Second, is free time. Sure I can do it/watch it at my leisure but I am just so dang busy that I may practice 5 times this week and then only at band practice for the next month. I wish this had been around (or even the internet for that matter) when I was young and single and had loads of free time to sit around and play guitar!! I will still jump on the lessons at some point but I'm gonna have to wait until I have the time to really benefit from it i.e. sit down and watch it and practice what I am learning.
 
M

Member 995

Just look at how many people post links to free lessons on this site...
 

weshunter

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
6,269
I feel a little like Truefire occupies a strange middle ground. You pay per lesson but also there's a membership fee?

Jamplay is an all-you-can eat buffet while you are paying the membership fee. It seems like Truefire wants you to pay twice. That kind of rubs me the wrong way. (Although the absence of clear pricing information on their home page is something I also dislike).
if you pay for the membership you don't have to pay for the individual lessons
 

mastercaster

Member
Messages
368
I quite like Truefire, and have purchased a lot of courses, but I don't much care for the membership thing. Firstly I like to own things, and be able to access them forever without subscription $. More importantly the interface just works a lot better on one's local computer vs. streaming over the web.

Of course the membership gives one access to more material, but I'm not even sure that is a good thing. I think that more dedicated focus on fewer things is better, for me anyway. I think you could take any 2 or 3 Truefire courses and if you really applied yourself to getting the most out of them, you would keep yourself busy for a long time.
+1!
 

Snottyboy

Member
Messages
1,665
I had an annual membership, but didn't renew it simply because I didn't have the time to really commit to it. Much like a gym membership...if you aren't commited to regular use, you'll end up paying for something you don't use. Individual courses may be a different story. Overall, I think the content is great.
 




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