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True or False: The expense and time put into my pedalboard exceeds my playing ability

The time and expense put into my pedalboard exceeds my playing ability and/or needs.

  • True

  • False


Results are only viewable after voting.
Messages
2,947
I'm never satisfied with my chops, I'm always striving to improve what I can do and say with the instrument. I have to admit most of my influences and favorite artists are monsters on the guitar so I'll probably never be satisfied with my playing ability. That said, when I look down at my board there's no single piece that I feel is lacking in the tone department. I feel each of them is the best at what they do so I'm at a huge disadvantage in living up to my gear! So yeah, I definately voted YES.
 

jaytiz25

Member
Messages
52
Heck I think we all know of a few guitarists that have made a career out of marginal playing ability and fridge sized effect racks.

You know what the songs they wrote with them are magnificent.

Shed the guilt, make music.

rob
Pretty poignant choice of word there. I love U2 but there's no doubt that the Edge isn't the most technical player out there. But as he pointed out in an interview once, he doesn't write stuff and then add effects later, he writes with effects, making them an invaluable part of not just his sound, but his actual musical personality and creativity. Interesting stuff.
 

wingwalker

Fuzzy Guitars
Messages
6,783
I'd love to know how to answer this question...I can put a dollar value on my pedal board(s) as well as an amount I put into them but I have no way of putting a dollar value on my playing ability...
 

Goofball

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
742
Even with all the directions this thread/poll can go, I am answering "yes" - if for no other reason that if I spent the time practicing that I do tweaking my pedalboard, I would be an absolute monster player! :D
 
Messages
6,841
False.

One could argue that I have too many overdrives(6), but considering they are all tools used to inspire creativity and encourage me to play more, I'd argue the opposite. I've never been told that my gear value exceeds someone's general view of my ability, and since my board is fairly basic and somewhat minimal in comparison to many around here, I'd say my pedalboard, at the very worst, could be accused of holding me back.

If that makes sense...
 

the_rising

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
972
True. But I see gear as a hobby so the enjoyment comes from seeking and experimenting with different pedals. No different than collecting coins, stamps, cars, baseball cards, radio-controlled cars, etc or having gear-driven hobbies such as golf.
 

PlexiFuzz

I know karate. Voodoo, too.
Messages
9,674
I would say true, assuming there's actually an objective measure of "playing ability."

I've said before in these kinds of threads that I think my "playing ability" peaked some 25-30 years ago. I certainly don't feel I play like someone who's played that long or that I'm 25-30 years more accomplished.

However, as others have mentioned, it's transitioned into primarily a hobby that I love participating in. And it's one that probably actually saves me money on therapy and blood pressure medication in the final tally.
 

cj_wattage

Member
Messages
6,716
I spend a lot more time designing circuits, doing PCB layouts, and building pedals than I do playing gigs. But as BAN mentioned, I find the process to be cathartic and therapeutic.
 

TheGuildedAge

Senior Member
Messages
13,060
I've said before in these kinds of threads that I think my "playing ability" peaked some 25-30 years ago. I certainly don't feel I play like someone who's played that long or that I'm 25-30 years more accomplished.

So true I think. I was a technically better guitarist when I was gigging 3 or 4 nights a week. Much faster.

But now, I think I am more creative. But it seems the more I learn, the less I know. I discover jazz, or Chet Atkins, and am open to a totally new style and so many things I don't know how to do.

A friend of mine showed me Open G last week, and I felt like it was my first day on guitar, moving fingers around, trying to make new sounds, not really sure where to go.

As for the survey, I voted false. I've been playing for a long enough time that I don't think any of us should justify what we use or don't use if it makes us happy or helps us gets sounds out of our heads. I like strumming an acoustic and singing along to some simple chords and I also like pushing every on button on my pedalboard just to see what happens.
 
Messages
215
Definitely true, but I don't think there's anything wrong with it. I like gear. New gear inspires me to sit for hours playing and practicing.
 

blobe

Member
Messages
783
It does inspire me to play the same riff over and over just to a/b test everything i got.
Nailed this one riff pretty good.

True, true, true.
 
Messages
215
I never A/B stuff. I know what my old stuff sounded like. I listen to the new stuff. I don't need to document every nuance to the T, I just know I like a piece of gear or I don't. If I like it, it stays, if not, it goes.

A new piece of gear usually sounds like something I haven't done before, which makes me think of music I haven't played before, which makes me practice that music, which usually adds something new to my repertoire of licks and music.
 

tmac65

Member
Messages
248
It does inspire me to play the same riff over and over just to a/b test everything i got.
Nailed this one riff pretty good.

True, true, true.
I got tired of playing the same riff over and over, so I put it on the looper. :)
 






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