Truss rod reached its limit?

Discussion in 'Luthier's Guitar & Bass Technical Discussion' started by chrisT, Jul 10, 2018.


  1. KGWagner

    KGWagner Member

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    I was just going to say the same thing. I don't see a problem here.
     
  2. Killed_by_Death

    Killed_by_Death Member

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    It's fine with 0.010" - 0.056" on it now, but what if the OP decides to start using 0.009" - 0.042".
     
  3. KGWagner

    KGWagner Member

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    Unless it's a really floppy neck or the frets are a wreck, I don't see it being an issue. .015" is a lotta range, in my experience.
     
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  4. Killed_by_Death

    Killed_by_Death Member

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    Well, if the OP had led with 'I have 0.016"' relief" then it wouldn't have gotten out of hand :p


    At this point it's time to go the other direction & tighten the truss rod.
    Some folks slack the strings to tighten, I do.
     
  5. pickdropper

    pickdropper Supporting Member

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    It probably would’ve helped if I haven’t read the post backwards to begin with.

    Thanks for stepping in. :cool:
     
  6. Sweetfinger

    Sweetfinger Supporting Member

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    Occasionally we get guitars through that essentially, have the truss rod adjusted completely loose. I'd rather have the guitar sit with more adjustment available but sometimes you got to work with what's in front of you. If it was a new guitar and not particularly special, I'd swap it out.

    Note for casual readers with similar problems:
    Some instruments have 2-way truss rods that will go "loose", then stiffen back up as they go into reverse mode, forcing more relief into the neck, enabling adjustment if the neck doesn't have enough relief without any force applied by the rod. The OP doesn't have a 2-way.
     
  7. Chad

    Chad Member

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    I had a guitar that was only getting .005” relief with the one-way truss rod completely loose with 9-42 strings. Not good. When that happens, it’s essentially like having a guitar without an adjustable truss rod. A luthier used heat to bend relief into the neck. That fixed it.
     
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  8. jwguitar

    jwguitar Member

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    That truss rod sounds like its doing its job almost too well. The neck is probably made out of very stiff wood. Depending of the stiffness of the wood and the gauge of strings the neck will vary as far as relief. I had the same thing in an old Ibanez L5 copy. I don't like much relief in my neck. However, sometimes if you want to get a little more I would put thicker strings on there and wait a bit. Also, this time of year depending where in the country you are, wood tends to expand due to the humidity creating low relief in necks. There are a lot of factors going on there.
     
  9. Dave Weir

    Dave Weir Gold Supporting Member

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    I can see how humidity changes would require an adjustment, but high and low should not both make the neck back bow. It seems to me like neither should.
    Humidity up, neck swells, gains length compared to the steel rod, adjust the nut out to lenghten the rod.
    Humidity down, neck shrinks, shorten the truss rod. If slack gives you .01, shouldn't slack always give you .01
    What is is in play? The difference in the the neck and the board? Maybe run-out? I don't know what I don't know.
     
  10. KGWagner

    KGWagner Member

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    In my experience, humidity changes don't cause significant neck length changes (although there is an effect), it's more in the realm of girth changes. When the neck shrinks/swells, the width changes slightly. That's where "fret sprout" comes from. Neck gets narrower when dry, frets stay the same size, so they stick out. I suspect it's because when the wood fibers take on moisture, they're getting "fatter", like my ex-wife ("It's just water weight!"). And just like people, whose height doesn't change when they retain water, necks don't change length along the grain.
     
  11. Killed_by_Death

    Killed_by_Death Member

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    I only had to adjust the truss rod on one instrument last Winter & that was to loosen the TR nut.
    Right now it needs to be tightened, but instead I'm just playing that instrument in lower tunings, for now.
     
  12. Colnago

    Colnago Member

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    Did the 2007 Fender American Series Strat have the bi-flex truss rod?
     
  13. KGWagner

    KGWagner Member

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    They're supposed to. I don't know if there's any way to see evidence that would prove it other than trying to adjust it to extremes.
     

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