Tube Amps and Ear Fatigue?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by Jchrisf, Apr 19, 2016.

  1. Jchrisf

    Jchrisf Member

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    Are tube amps good on the ears at lower volumes? I am new to them. I just got a Laney IRT Studio and I find that my ears don't fatigue when practicing/playing like every other amp (SS, Modeler, Software) I have tried. Just playing through my computer and Rokit 5 monitors fatigues my ears at the same volume as does my Peavey Vypyr and every other non tube amp I have tried.
     
  2. halcyon

    halcyon Supporting Member

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    I would think that it depends on the specific amp, how you have it EQ'd, and to what frequencies your ears are sensitive.
     
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  3. FFTT

    FFTT Member

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    If you can work/practice without using headphones, your hearing will be safer at somewhat reasonable volumes.

    Cheap speakers can be irritating and harsh especially if you push mids.

    If you are working hours on end, be sure to give yourself silence breaks.

    Yard equipment, fire arms, power and air tools can all take their toll too.

    If you have any reason to suspect a change in your hearing, definitely see a musician qualified audiologist.
     
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  4. Stratonator

    Stratonator Member

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    RockIt speakers could be hyping certain frequencies in the midrange that could trigger ear fatigue, same as your Peavey.

    Lots of gear gets props at first for sounding punchy or in-your-face but 20 minutes of that sound and ear fatigue starts which isn't so great.
     
  5. JB6464

    JB6464 Member

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    I think the speakers used with certain tube amps is what causes ear fatique the most .
    A good tube amp can be hacked real quick with the wrong speakers .
     
  6. tiktok

    tiktok Supporting Member

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    dB and Hz are independent of what produces them.
     
  7. halcyon

    halcyon Supporting Member

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    But the Vypyr Hz the most, apparently.
     
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  8. tele_jas

    tele_jas Member

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    Before my earplug days, I'd use my amp a day or two after a gig and the treble was so cranked up it must have sounded horrible live, but the sound man never said anything. I think ear fatigue can play into a lot of scenario's when it comes to dialing in tone. I know I would always kick the treble up a notch or two every set......So by the end of the night, it sounded good to my dead ears but was actually very bright.

    Now-a-days, I set my tone and play 1 song (live) without ear plugs, to make sure it's "all good" then the plugs go in. At home, I know where my volume limit is and if my ears ring after practicing, then it was too loud and I make a mental note and don't go that loud again.
     
  9. teleman1

    teleman1 Supporting Member

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    I think you are getting what the audio world calls digititus. Same thing happened with CD's till they improved the DAC's> If you have acute hearing, I can see how this would grate on you.
     
  10. Silent Sound

    Silent Sound Member

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    What fatigues your ears are frequency and loudness. So speakers would probably have a larger impact on ear fatigue than what kind of amp it was. Also the tone settings can play a role in this.

    About the only thing a tube amp will do differently than a solid state one is it will gradually compress and clip, whereas a SS amp will square wave pretty quickly. This doesn't mean it would hurt your ears more, but you may decide that you don't like that sound as much and decide that it "hurts" to listen to, when in reality, you just don't like it. Much like how a terrible pop song on the radio "hurts" my ears to listen to at any volume. It's just a psychosomatic reaction to an aversion.
     
  11. FFTT

    FFTT Member

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    I think some of the unnatural frequencies of some processor overdrives and FX could be causing some damage.
     

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