Tweed Fender for modern hi-gain sound?

Discussion in 'Amps and Cabs' started by cooler21, Aug 27, 2008.

  1. cooler21

    cooler21 Member

    Messages:
    40
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2007
    Hi. What do you guys think about the idea of having an Tweed amp for a nu-metal or modern hard rock music? I've heard the Irish band The Frames and their frontman plays thru 100w tweed Twin with some stompboxes (fuzzes, distortions etc.) and it sounded killer and very hard ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_I_6GJzcDsA ). And all the early Marshalls and Mesa Mk.I are more or less exact copy of old tweed Bassman... Will I get good sound from it or should I rather buy VHT, Mesa etc.? Thanks
     
  2. Jerrod

    Jerrod Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    11,329
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2002
    Unusual, but it's your call.

    Well, that's about the 3rd worst audio I've ever heard, INCLUDING other Youtube clips. If you could even hear the guitar, never mind claim that it's "killer" and "hard" you're a better man than I.

    WTF are you talking about? OK, the JTM45 has some similarities, but what does that have to do with nu-metal or hard rock? And the Mesa Mark I has nothing to do with a tweed Bassman.

    I don't know.

    I don't know. What do you like? You should go try some amps. Tweed Twins, tweed Bassmans, early Marshalls, Mesa Mark I, VHT, Mesa (Rectifiers I assume)... that's a pretty broad net. You need to decide what you like.
     
  3. 155

    155 Supporting Member

    Messages:
    419
    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Location:
    ct,usa
    youll get good sound but youll need pedals so you wont as good of a sound if you bought something for that specific purpose. That said I have a hrdx that I use with a ehx metal muff and an eq and sounds pretty kickass , not as good as my roadster but good and it easy to transport
     
  4. bobefann

    bobefann Member

    Messages:
    50
    Joined:
    May 15, 2007
    i would get an eq if i were you and if your trying to do highgain, the bass of the tweed might be to woofy for that. youll need pedals
     
  5. gldtp99

    gldtp99 Member

    Messages:
    2,508
    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2005
    Location:
    Texas
    Tweed-type amps, especially with tube rectifiers (tube rec can limit size of 1st stage filter caps=possible mushy low end response--- not great for de-tuned guitars), aren't usually preferred for modern Hi-Gain tones.
    But you might like an amp like this with a Metal Zone or similar pedal pushing it---- try it out vs the newer amps that are designed to produce tones like this all by themselves.........................gldtp99
     
  6. cooler21

    cooler21 Member

    Messages:
    40
    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2007
    155, bobefann and gldtp99 - thank you for your replies :)

    And to pedalcr8z and Jerrod: thank you for your tolerance and broadmind. The youtube clip was not ment to hear the guitar in hi-fi quality but rather to show what style the band plays. So if you want search google and find better sounding clips - I though I don't have to write this after every sentence. And about the statement that "all the early Marshalls and Mesa Mk.I are more or less exact copy of old tweed Bassman..." Don't argue whith me, argue with Mr. Fargen of Fargen amps: http://www.fargenamps.com/1955-fender-tweed-bassman-guitar-amp.html
     
  7. jakob

    jakob Member

    Messages:
    579
    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2006
    Location:
    Iceland
    Tweed and Nu-Metal/Thrash/Heavy metal is like mixing oil and water.

    Get a amp that does it well, Dual, Triple rectifiers, JVM, Diezel...there are so
    many great amps out there for that sound.
     
  8. Jerrod

    Jerrod Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    11,329
    Joined:
    Jan 7, 2002
    :rolleyes:

    While the JTM45 has a lot in common with the Bassman, it's hardly an exact copy, and neither is generally considered a nu-metal amp. They are mid-gain amps at best, and have low ends that are far too loose for most people's taste playing modern rock.

    As for the Mesa Mark I, Fargen does NOT say the Mark I is a copy. Even if the Bassman is the starting point for the Mk I (I don't remember what Randall used), the Mk I is heavily modded to get the gain. Again, the Mk I isn't built for super tight chugga-chugga, it's built for the Carlos gained out lead. And the clean sound isn't switchable.

    As I noted, I suggest you decide for yourself what you like. If you want the stock answer, go buy a Recto. If you want your own sound, that will require you to decide.
     
  9. pedalcr8z

    pedalcr8z Supporting Member

    Messages:
    3,392
    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2005
    Location:
    Denver, Colorado
    All we are simply trying to tell you is that if you want a metal sound, buy a metal amp......as for the clip you included, you implied how awesome their sound was and we were all expecting that the clip you enclosed would sound that way but it was terrible. You've hit a funny bone also as Tweeds are some of the most revered amps of all time FOR WHAT THEY DO and to try and use one for metal is akin to buying a Bentley for off road use! :BEER
     
  10. SatelliteAmps

    SatelliteAmps Member

    Messages:
    6,185
    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2007
    Location:
    Normal Heights, Calif
    It's not a question of arguing with Mr. Fargen. It's a badly made statement that many people on the internet use without looking at the actual circuitry. There are some similarities, but if you were to put all of them next to each other, they are all different, and they all sound different.
     
  11. GasMask

    GasMask Member

    Messages:
    3,434
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2005
    Location:
    West of Weird
    +1

    Instead of getting the "wrong" amp and trying to use pedals to get the sound you want, why not just buy the right amp to begin with?!
     
  12. FrankieSixxxgun

    FrankieSixxxgun Member

    Messages:
    3,040
    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2008
    Location:
    Tampa, FL
    All the early Marshalls are also pretty low gain for modern standards and would not hold up to that scooped, heavy numetal sound. I bet even a JCM 800, which is basically the highest gain amp based on that design, would leave you wanting. If you plan on driving a Fender Tweed with mostly stomp boxes, why not just save the money and get a modeling amp?
     
  13. derekd

    derekd Supporting Member

    Messages:
    34,718
    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2007
    Location:
    In a van down by the river
    I would also include Engl in the search. They have some amps that bridge the gap between metal and more traditional rock sounds.
     
  14. Nolatone Ampworks

    Nolatone Ampworks Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    2,736
    Joined:
    Jun 4, 2006
    Location:
    Flowery Branch, GA
    I dunno, maybe the guy wants a nice clean to go with it, and few argue that a Mesa Rectifier doesn't have as nice a clean as say a tweed Bassman. I've heard convincing metal tones with a Twin Reverb and a pedal.

    I'd say the main thing, if you're going to try and do that is to get a model that has enough headroom to let the pedal do it's thing without it's own overdrive/compression effecting the pedal. That'd be a Bassman or Twin I would imagine.
     
  15. prsnstrat

    prsnstrat Member

    Messages:
    1,900
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2005
    Brilliant! :agree
     
  16. highrise

    highrise Member

    Messages:
    3,854
    Joined:
    Jun 23, 2008
    The warmer the clean channel, the better distortion sounds over it.

    Be careful playing loud de-tuned metal thru "vintage" speakers. While the wattage rating of the speaker and amplifier may indicate that you're within safe operating range, if you're blasting it...you need to be mindful of the amt of bass youre using. It's too easy to blow AlNiCo Jensens...don't ask me how I know.
     
  17. prsnstrat

    prsnstrat Member

    Messages:
    1,900
    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2005
    Good point abstract. A pair of 50 watt ceramic Blue dogs should be great with this amp under higher gain. Or private Jacks if you go eminence.
     
  18. Benlevy

    Benlevy Member

    Messages:
    514
    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2006
    Location:
    Atlanta
    I agree with Paul (imagine that!). I use a mid-sixties Bassman with pedals for all dirt. Good cleans, and as much dirt as the pedals deliver. I've wanted a great high gain amp, and just can't find one that makes me happier than pedals. Happy enough to spend that kind of cash anyway. Don't know about the tweeds, but the blackface works for me...
     
  19. mad dog

    mad dog Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    10,509
    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2005
    Location:
    Montclair, NJ
    I think the lo or high power tweed twin is flexible enough to try most anything. Depending on how hardcore the music gets, you might want to try more efficient ceramics in place of the alnicos.
     
  20. Bucksears

    Bucksears Silver Supporting Member

    Messages:
    6,730
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2007
    Location:
    Clayton, NC (just east 'o Raleigh)
    For a long time, I've gone with a Fender (first an Ultra Chorus, then two HRDevilles, currently an SRRI) and used dirt pedals for overdrive, distortion and metal (even with a Tele!!)
    As stated, there ARE certain aspects to metal that a tweed circuit simply isn't made for: bass not tight enough for palm-muting, too many mids to do scooped. But if you're in love with that tweed clean sound, that's going to be a hard match. (unless you get an Egnater MOD50 with the BMAN and E-RECT modules, but you're talking $2-3G's)
    Honestly, I'd take a look at either a Blackface Fender amp (IMHO it handles dirt pedals better than a tweed and has legendary clean tone; I'd recommend a Twin for the 12's and solid-state rectifier) OR check out the Fender SuperSonic; the SS has a tweed/blackface (switchable) clean channel and a modern(ish) high-gain channel.

    EDIT: I had a Bassman LTD for 1 day; got it home and it sounded like MUSH with any of my distortion pedals. Took it back to GC the next day for the SRRI that I have now. That was 3 and a 1/2 yrs ago.

    But all that aside, you need to check out amps in person; we're only going to tell you things based on what we know and have heard.
    Good luck,
    - Buck
     

Share This Page