Tyler: Maybe it's the Headstock?

Discussion in 'The Small Company Luthiers' started by DWB1960, Jun 27, 2006.

  1. DWB1960

    DWB1960 Senior Member

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    So I've had my new Tyler for about a week and feel it's the best Strat I've ever owned (and I've owned a ton of the real deal as well as other makers take on the design).

    Putting aside the incredible feeling neck (can a rosewood topped maple neck be any more comfortable?), and the really killer mid-boost circuit with bypass (better and more usable than I imagined) - and you're still left with a super, super sounding strat.

    The plugged tones (sans boost) are everything you want from a strat and then some. There's a real whomp added to the usual stingy bite and an abundance of nice harmonic overtones are on hand.

    So what's the magic? The neck pocket is nothing special. The Wilkinson Gotoh bridge I'm sure has something to do with it. But I'm starting to think that the oversized paddle headstock might be a part of the secret. Maybe that added bit of tonewood up there is the key????

    I don't own a large headstock strat to compare it to.

    Anyone else have any thoughts on why Tylers sound so freakin good?
     
  2. PRSkeeto

    PRSkeeto Member

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    James Tyler....?
     
  3. DWB1960

    DWB1960 Senior Member

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    Si.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Thor

    Thor Member

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    Interesting theory about the increased mass of the headstock...

    Glad you are enjoying your new guit-fiddle - congrats,

    Ed
     
  5. Marty s Horne

    Marty s Horne Member

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    I think some people have a gift for building a guitar where the whole is greater than the sum of it's parts.
     
  6. Unburst

    Unburst Member

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    Well, I've never played a Tyler but I doubt the headstock is the reason.

    I have a feeling it's Mr. Tyler's ears/eyes/hands.

    Beautiful guitar btw, you just got that out of the emporium?
    I was very tempted, but I want a HB in the bridge.
     
  7. DWB1960

    DWB1960 Senior Member

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    I found this on Ebay. To be honest, engaging the midboost in the bridge position is pretty damn hot as is! Plus it maintains the single coil clarity. I was looking for a Landau with the SSH combo but in hindsight I'm glad I missed out on one and scored this instead.

    I think headstock mass does make quite a difference on some guitars. I replaced the stock klusons with much heavier grover tuners on a Les Paul once and it made a BIG difference.
     
  8. trisonic

    trisonic Member

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    Exactly.
    Some are just more talented. Also: Koll, Chapin, etc

    Best, Pete.
     
  9. yeast2000

    yeast2000 Member

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    I agree with Unburst. Tyler classic models have smaller headstocks and they sound just as good. Beautiful guitar. Congratulations.
     
  10. Mr.Hanky

    Mr.Hanky Supporting Member

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  11. Dave Orban

    Dave Orban Gold Supporting Member

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    Now, if that were covered with repetitive writing, THEN you'd really have something...


    LOL!
     
  12. yeast2000

    yeast2000 Member

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    Hmm.. Interesting. I have both SE and classic. 4 small James Tyler logs on SE headstock and 3 small logs on classic headstock (making it tad smaller than SE headstock).
     
  13. jayhawk

    jayhawk Member

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    The unusual slant of the pickups has to add something to the voicing - less slant on the bridge, some slant (instead of perpendicular to the strings) on the neck and middle.

    It looks like the bridge pickup is further from the bridge than a typical strat, too.
     
  14. Guitar James

    Guitar James Member

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    Wow thats amazing I,ve never noticed that before but your right if you look at pictures of Clasiic headstocks and compare them to the SE's they are different, well spotted:AOK
    I have a Burning water SE myself and it is just the hugest sounding guitar, I don't know if it's the Mamywo body but it just vibrates like crazy.
     
  15. stevieboy

    stevieboy Clouds yell at me Gold Supporting Member

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    If it was in my neighborhood, it would be.
     
  16. Guitar James

    Guitar James Member

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    Yeah but Donnie B's is a Tyler Studio Elite Retro and yours is a Tyler Classic.
    Studio Elites have seven small logos. The retros have the slanted pups like some of the elites.
     
  17. jharpersj

    jharpersj Silver Supporting Member

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    I have had a bunch of them (20 probably), for what I like the maple neck alder body seemed to work best, not a big fan of the virtual vinatge or the landau secret hum. Mid boost was cool to have but I have found many tylers to be overly dark sounding and to me the wilky bridge seems to contribute to the tone too much, hard to describe but you can hear the influence of the bridge saddles more than I would like, the bridge Grosh or anderson uses I would prefer (or the dpergo bridge would be even better )

    The necks are the **** hands down, throw on fralins and a good hum and tylers are hard to beat, but I wish he would use a different bridge
     
  18. yeast2000

    yeast2000 Member

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    Oh.. I apologize about the confusion. I meant small logos below the big Tyler logo. So, I guess 6 for classic and 7 for SE then. As far as PUs are concerned, no slanting for mine either.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  19. yeast2000

    yeast2000 Member

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    I also think all tylers sound awesome regardless the headstock-size.
    Some magic he throws in.
     
  20. lbw

    lbw Member

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    This reminds me of a story (you can read this in the PRS book) where Carlos Santana once remarked to Paul Reed Smith that he thought the reason his guita sounded so good was 'the capacitor on the volume control'.
    Paul's response was 'Errr, no'. After the fourth guitar, Carlos finally came to the conclusion that Paul was making something special and all these guitars weren't 'accidents of god'.

    I'm sure the same applies to James Tyler. There's a lot of reasons why those guitars sound so good.
     

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