U.S. Rock Scene Has Never Recovered From Rise Of Early '90s Grunge

Jive Miguel

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238
http://www.blabbermouth.net/news/ro...overed-from-rise-of-early-90s-grunge-movement

"In the '90s, when the grunge rock thing hit, with NIRVANA and all that, everybody thought it was cool to be anti-rock star. But in a way they sort of anti-rock starred themselves right out the door, because the rap guys came in and they said, 'Fu*k it. We'll be the rock stars then, if you guys are going to wear flannel shirts and stare at your feet.' And in the U.S., truthfully, rock music has never recovered from that. A whole generation of kids thought, 'Fu*k this! Rock music is boring. Let's go listen to rap music.' And it's never recovered. I mean, over [in the U.K.] it's different. You could never throw a festival like [Download] in the U.S. and get this many people, with just rock music. Never."
 

badhorsie551

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I don't think id blame grunge as much as MTV pushing all the boy bands/rap rock/ female singers from the late 90's to the early 2000's.

Changing tastes with how music was distributed/available probably made bigger changes.
 

Heinz57Pep

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11,228
I agree that all the swagger, cocksure attitude and hedonism shifted over to hip-hop and never really returned to rock.
 

stuco

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848
So would you say the glam/hair metal that dominated rock just before grunge was the "real rock"? The golden age of rock and roll was in sharp decline by the time grunge hit. Rock never recovered from the rise of MTV IMO.
 

paranoid70

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6,523
I'll copy and paste the comment I wrote for that story:

I'd rather just blame corporate radio stations. It's all divas, boy bands, and classic rock. Good new rock bands have no outlet.
 

rsm

Senior Member
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14,080
I don't know about "real rock", but guitar based music with virtuosity (e.g., shred and metal) went back underground or like jazz, just stayed a niche. The "rock star image" died with the demise of '80s hair bands. So, to me (IMO), grunge was the start of the decline of popular guitar focused music IMO, the start of the dark ages (continued by most "new country" music). Guitar music is parent, grandparent or older music now.
 

Misterbulbous

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7,973
rock radio is so pathetic. Lexington radio had their usual "hair metal weekend"...meanwhile; bands from this genre with new music like Tesla and Night Ranger have absolutely no chance of getting airplay. That has to be extremely frustrating for those guys.
 

aman74

Silver Supporting Member
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10,055
Sort of agree, but I think it misses the point a bit. Grunge was rock as well, so what killed it? We know the answer, but I think it would have happened regardless of what the last big mainstream rock was all about.
 

phil_m

Trying is the first step towards failure.
Gold Supporting Member
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In many respects, rock was the music of the baby boomer generation. Grunge was perhaps a reaction of the first wave of the baby boomer's children against it, in a way. It's still part of the American musical lexicon, for sure, but I don't think it will ever be the same sort of cultural force, and I don't really think that's necessarily a bad thing. Much like the other American musical inventions, it will be taken and incorporated into new forms.
 

rsm

Senior Member
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14,080
It seems, perhaps, that it was not a specific "rock" genre that lead to the demise or reduction of "rock", but rather the demise of the guitar as the main instrument in popular or mainstream music? Now maybe many creative musos are not focused on creating with or for guitar? Maybe an oversimplification, but I associate rock with guitar, post-rock without guitar (minimal).
 

Belmont

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3,464
guitar has become passe in a way, there's 8 year olds on youtube that can shred for days, people aren't blown away anymore.
the notion that guitar is somehow more important than the other instruments in the band, is old and tired.
I think it's never gone away actually, it's just that there's so much diversity now that peoples attention is spread out, one band doesn't get all the glory while others are hidden away and shunned by the industry.
music has never been better imo.
 

phil_m

Trying is the first step towards failure.
Gold Supporting Member
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14,384
It seems, perhaps, that it was not a specific "rock" genre that lead to the demise or reduction of "rock", but rather the demise of the guitar as the main instrument in popular or mainstream music? Now maybe many creative musos are not focused on creating with or for guitar?

I guess I just don't see the huge decline in guitar-based music. Sure there's rap and EDM, and then you have the dance-oriented pop side of things, but that's been around since the 80s. There are plenty of bands playing guitar-oriented music still. Perhaps they don't have a lot of guitar solos and the lead guitarist isn't a focus, but there's still a lot of people playing guitar. As far as convenience goes, it's still a lot easier for most people to write a song on an acoustic guitar than on a keyboard.

I don't think people are interesting in guitar gods anymore, and I'm thankful for that, really. But I'm not too worried about the guitar dying off.
 

Bradmeister

Member
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1,012
Alright, guys, what is your opinion on the basic question in the article? Could something like the Download Festival be held in the US and get as much attendance?

Personally, I think it could. There are enough lovers of rock in the US. You just have to be somewhat strategic in where you hold it. Certain areas of the country rock more than others. The midwest and parts of the east come to my mind. Not sure about NYC. Maybe have it in Chicago early in the summer so it doesn't interfere with Lollapalooza.
 

2HBStrat

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41,218
It's not MTV's or commercial radio's fault....they're only playing what appeals to their demographic. Maybe musical tastes have changed, but I don't think you can force feel music to people. If they don't like it they will just change the channel. Boy bands and chick singers and Bro-Country artists and rap is on the radio because listeners LIKE it....
 

Tiny Montgomery

Silver Supporting Member
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10,294
The fact that people still argue about this, over 20 years after the fact, is a testament to just how out of touch a lot of guitarists are.

Music isn't all about whatever instrument you personally happen to play. That is, of course, disregarding the irony that grunge WAS guitar based rock.
 

Bankston

Member
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16,665
If rock died after grunge, then how does anyone explain the overwhelming popularity of Guitar Hero when it blew up?

The fact is that file-sharing and rising ticket prices have hurt rock music more than "grunge." But yea, it would be great to have some younger rock stars.
 




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