UAD Ox Box, is it still a thing in 2022?

Pongo

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1,347
I have largely put UA on my black list after seeing no continued software support for their 8 months old fx pedals and the OX. Premium prices without premium product and support.

Btw don’t sleep on that Goldfinger 81 mode. Turn up the presence and/or treble quite high and it can be a mean metal machine.
That doesn't change my opinion on the product itself as a fantastic tool, but unfortunately, I don't think your view on software/support is unreasonable at all. My experience with UA support has varied between epically helpful and virtually non-existent. So using the OX feels a little like vacationing on a fancy cruise ship with the knowledge that Harvey Dent is in charge of the lifeboats. What's gonna happen if something goes wrong? Who knows? Not me! A friend of mine is actually having an issue with his OX right now, and I'm following the case with keen interest/dread.
 
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I saw one locally for sale for a near reasonable price. I've heard there hasn't been any updates for a while. I currently use a Suhr RL+Two notes CAB m+, what would the benefits be from going with OxBox?

It really depends what you plan to use it for. I think if you’re primarily using it as a recording tool then the main benefit would be the mic and cab sims which are truly the best in the business. As an attenuator as others have said it’s nothing special. I own one and have used it for years now. The attenuator is very good on the first two settings (so basically a max of -6db attenuation). Below that it’s too much attenuation, it doesn’t sound bad but it’s simply a factor of attenuating any amp too much it just loses its mojo.

The foh benefits are good too but again that may or may not be valuable to you at all. I don’t think there would be any reason to upgrade to it unless you’re really after the UA comp and reverb which is truly excellent and some of their cab/mic sims which are world class. As an attenuator there’s no reason to buy the ox over something like a power station.

The only other thing I can mention about the ox though is it’s reliability with running big heads into it. This is why I bought it, at the time it seemed to be the most hardy unit that was being used with NMV 100watt amps which obviously throw more than 100 watts when cooking. My experience has been that the ox functions very well with these big amps, and I only use it to shave -6db and take advantage of its IO and recording capabilities as I prefer it to micing cabs.

Hope that helps!
 
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100
The things that make the OX attenuator weak:

1. Impedance curve. Masterplant has measured impedance curves of several attenuators and in his measurements only his own attenuators and the Suhr RL look anything even close to what a real impedance curve on a speaker looks like - usually a peak in the low frequencies and a skislope in the highs. This has a direct effect on the sound and feel of the amp connected. The more it looks like a speaker, the more it acts as if connected direct to a speaker.
2. Stepped attenuator. This is limiting if your ideal volume and tone is right between step 2 and 3 where 2 is slightly too loud and 3 is too quiet. With only 5 steps and an off setting, that's not a lot of steps between "obnoxiously loud" and "bedroom volume".
Long time ox user here and I agree with this post.

The reason the ox attenuator works for me is because I ONLY use setting 5(which is very close to bypass) and setting 4(which is only -6db). I have the luxury of being able to play loud all the time and that’s why that’s the extent of the attenuation I need, it just dials back the aggressive frequencies enough that I can play without hearing protection for extended periods of time. If you’re looking for something to make your amps bedroom level quiet the ox is not the box for you :). Once you hit click three there is just a massive drop in volume and for me, no point playing at that volume.

Sorry I should add this, the strengths of the ox are mainly:

1. It’s robust and reliable in my experience
2. As a recording tool it’s really perfect.
3. If you only need to attenuate -6db you’re good to go!
4. It does look great.
 

Pongo

Member
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1,347
It really depends what you plan to use it for. I think if you’re primarily using it as a recording tool then the main benefit would be the mic and cab sims which are truly the best in the business.
Very true. I was just thinking earlier tonight: for my money and taste, the Badger 35 sounds even better through the cab sims than anything I own – including the Badger's matched 1x12 cab. It feels kind of sacrilegious admitting that, but hey, I can think of worse problems in life than "boo hoo, I'm laying down these sweet-sounding tracks at 2 am and not a single person in the house is yelling at me."
 

vadsy

Silver Supporting Member
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2,280
Plugged in my new (used) Ox Box tonight. 20 min toe in the water trial and I'm very happy. App is very easy to set up and use, got some great sounds really quick through the headphones while running a tube amp otherwise silent. The mics and cabs sound good, the effect plugins sound good. I actually bypassed my board and plugged direct in because it seems to have enough onboard. I'll try and record direct while silent tomorrow and then record direct and a physically mic'd cab in the room, see how that can be used.
 

Black_Label

Silver Supporting Member
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4,698
I think the OX is still very much a thing. I’ve run through about a dozen attenuators over the last 15 years or so and the OX is the only one that’s really changed how and when I can record (for the better). My Power Station is fantastic but it collects dust now. The OX is perfect in a home recording setup where volume is an issue and you’re looking to record direct to your interface with top notch cab sims.
 

GuitarGuy316

Member
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472
I think the OX is still very much a thing. I’ve run through about a dozen attenuators over the last 15 years or so and the OX is the only one that’s really changed how and when I can record (for the better). My Power Station is fantastic but it collects dust now. The OX is perfect in a home recording setup where volume is an issue and you’re looking to record direct to your interface with top notch cab sims.
As far as the reactive load and line out sound, do you think there’s a difference between the Powerstation and OX?
 
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Black_Label

Silver Supporting Member
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4,698
As far as the reactive load and line out sound, do you think there’s d y difference between the Powerstation and OX?
It’s hard to say because of the implementation. With the OX, it’s really convenient to have the separate speaker and line out volume controls as well as stereo outputs and the AUD cab sims (which are top notch.) The PS feeds the raw amp sound direct in mono. The cab sims, recording fx, mics and stereo room sounds on the OX are better than any VST software I’ve tried. I usually record the stereo out from the OX along with 2-4 mics on my cab, sent through a Neve mic pre and into my interface; most of the time I keep the UAD sounds and blend one or two mics. With the PS, there’s a lot more work to get usable recording sounds out of it.
 

green72

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1,170
If you just want to get a line level signal from your amp to your DAW, you can pick up a Julius Music Box off Reverb for $150.
Works great.
 

GuitarGuy316

Member
Messages
472
It’s hard to say because of the implementation. With the OX, it’s really convenient to have the separate speaker and line out volume controls as well as stereo outputs and the AUD cab sims (which are top notch.) The PS feeds the raw amp sound direct in mono. The cab sims, recording fx, mics and stereo room sounds on the OX are better than any VST software I’ve tried. I usually record the stereo out from the OX along with 2-4 mics on my cab, sent through a Neve mic pre and into my interface; most of the time I keep the UAD sounds and blend one or two mics. With the PS, there’s a lot more work to get usable recording sounds out of it.
Thanks. Is the UA software standalone or does it only work in a DAW?
 

Black_Label

Silver Supporting Member
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4,698
Thanks. Is the UA software standalone or does it only work in a DAW?
It’s standalone. I don’t think you can bring it up in a DAW for automation (not sure why you’d want to). The only thing I don’t love about the OX is the WiFi connection, which only works on the 2.5ghz band and is kind of a pita to connect. But once you get it set up, the software is great. I mess with the software about every six months - I just load six good presets that work with all my amp heads into the unit and stick to them.
 
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Very true. I was just thinking earlier tonight: for my money and taste, the Badger 35 sounds even better through the cab sims than anything I own – including the Badger's matched 1x12 cab. It feels kind of sacrilegious admitting that, but hey, I can think of worse problems in life than "boo hoo, I'm laying down these sweet-sounding tracks at 2 am and not a single person in the house is yelling at me."
Funny you say that, I MUCH prefer the sound of my Vox AC30 CC2 via the OX than through it's own cab. Was really suprised!
 

vadsy

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,280
I recorded for the first time last night with the Ox, went well. Took a minute to get the optical properly routed through the interface and show up in my DAW but after that I was off and sailing. Took a couple of presets and tried them in a track I need a solo for, turned up the amp and played through a few times. All while running pretty much silent. Wife was on her spin bike in the same room and my kid didn't care as he putzed away on the console. I thought that was the best part, couldn't imagine how loud it would be and the amount of setup up required to get a 25 second clip recorded otherwise.

This device is overkill for me but I have a few tube amps I love and am familiar with so being able to use them like this is still somewhat satisfying, although I'd love to be able to mic everything up and play loud all the time.

Next I'll try actually hooking up a cab and the attenuator. Anyone record the cab while also sending a signal directly out of the Ox to DAW, any benefit to blending things together?
 

Chris Milne

Member
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244
Comparing apples with oranges. Different options between gear is good and if you don’t like the OX cab selection or attenuators in general don’t buy it. With the PS 100 you still need to buy an IR loader of some sorts and IR packs. The PS doesn’t come with a neat looking app and the great sounding UA effects for example.

Your comment came over like someone who has no first hand experience with the OX but bashing the product with commenting it got terrible IR? The OX doesn’t use just static IR tech to begin with which is part of the charm and sonic quality. OX has an analog attenuator, PS 100 is a reamper and has no digital DSP on board so it might be a great piece of gear but you have to invest in other gear if you want similar OX features.

OX box costs in Europe 1200 euro.
PS 100 costs in Europe 1250 euro.

Still a similar and cheaper alternative?

I bought a Fryette ps2 for $699 @20% off a few years ago. It’s now $899 and no one is offering a deal. Price hikes are here in every thing
 

Bram576

Supporting Member
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11
Ox box has some cool features but for me the cheap two notes torpedo works great. I just run my amp into my daw and use my impulse responses in there. York audio are very very hard to beat imo.
 

jujube

Member
Messages
2,617
I saw one locally for sale for a near reasonable price. I've heard there hasn't been any updates for a while. I currently use a Suhr RL+Two notes CAB m+, what would the benefits be from going with OxBox?
My friend has tried many devices. He preferred the Waza TAE to the Oxbox. Overall, it might be better to take a modular best of breed approach rather than an all-in-one approach.

If you want to reduce volume, then the Fryette Powerstation ( I have a PS v1 still going strong) is one of the best. For silent recording, many options exist or you can just use your Two notes CAB with a PS.
 

natebernstein

Member
Messages
760
I'm contemplating buying an OX, primarily for recording. One (potentially very dumb) question I'm hoping folks here might be able to answer: How do I connect the OX to my Apogee Quartet audio interface?

The Apogee has two Optical inputs in addition to the four analog XLR-1/4" inputs. The OX appears to have L and R mono line outputs and two stereo S/PDIF outputs (one RCA and the other TOSLINK). I'm not sure if the Optical inputs on the Quartet (I've never used them) are compatible with either of the S/PDIF outputs on the OX. And if I used the analog line outputs, would I need to use both, plugging each into one of the four line inputs on Quartet? If using the latter method would I need to combine the two inputs into a single track, and wouldn't that create issues later on with respect to panning, etc.?

Would really appreciate any insights from anyone using OX with an Apogee interface. Seems like they designed it with a UA interface in mind. Thanks!
 

zygoat

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,156
I'm contemplating buying an OX, primarily for recording. One (potentially very dumb) question I'm hoping folks here might be able to answer: How do I connect the OX to my Apogee Quartet audio interface?

The Apogee has two Optical inputs in addition to the four analog XLR-1/4" inputs. The OX appears to have L and R mono line outputs and two stereo S/PDIF outputs (one RCA and the other TOSLINK). I'm not sure if the Optical inputs on the Quartet (I've never used them) are compatible with either of the S/PDIF outputs on the OX. And if I used the analog line outputs, would I need to use both, plugging each into one of the four line inputs on Quartet? If using the latter method would I need to combine the two inputs into a single track, and wouldn't that create issues later on with respect to panning, etc.?

Would really appreciate any insights from anyone using OX with an Apogee interface. Seems like they designed it with a UA interface in mind. Thanks!
I've never used the S/PDIF option, but I do use an Ox with an Apogee Duet. No dumb questions! Typically what I'll do when I get ready to record a guitar part is that I'll pull up my go-to rig preset, fine tune it in the Ox app for the part I'm working on, and this will determine if I go out to the Duet with either one or two cables. Most of the time I get things to sound right with everything in the Ox panned center, so I'll go with only the Left output, with a 1/4" to XLR cable into the line input of the Duet. I find that gives me more flexibility adding reverb and delay in Logic, and I won't be stuck with reverb settings that might be too little or too much when it comes time to mix. But the effects in the Ox are top notch, as we know! Other times, especially for parts that only need one guitar panned center-ish, I'll be a little more creative with the Ox's stereo room mics, reverbs, and delays, and then come out of it with two 1/4" to XLRs to both Duet line-ins, and pan them hard left and right in the Apogee Control app. So to answer your question about the Ox's analog outs, you are fine using either the Left only, or both. How you have things set up in the Ox app and your Quartet settings will dictate how things are panned.

There is one annoying thing about this process. I need to have a USB hub running all the time when I'm in Logic due to using an external hard drive, iLok dongle, USB keyboard, etc. The USB hubs are known to prevent not only the Ox app, but many wifi-enabled apps, from keeping connection because there is some kind of interference with 2 ghz wifi and USB hubs. I haven't tried looking into different hubs but I may need to, because I have no choice but to tweak my tones through the Ox app before firing up the rest of my recording rig.
 
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Mildwest

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,104
I've never used the S/PDIF option, but I do use an Ox with an Apogee Duet. No dumb questions! Typically what I'll do when I get ready to record a guitar part is that I'll pull up my go-to rig preset, fine tune it in the Ox app for the part I'm working on, and this will determine if I go out to the Duet with either one or two cables. Most of the time I get things to sound right with everything in the Ox panned center, so I'll go with only the Left output, with a 1/4" to XLR cable into the line input of the Duet. I find that gives me more flexibility adding reverb and delay in Logic, and I won't be stuck with reverb settings that might be too little or too much when it comes time to mix. But the effects in the Ox are top notch, as we know! Other times, especially for parts that only need one guitar panned center-ish, I'll be a little more creative with the Ox's stereo room mics, reverbs, and delays, and then come out of it with two 1/4" to XLRs to both Duet line-ins, and pan them hard left and right in the Apogee Control app. So to answer your question about the Ox's analog outs, you are fine using either the Left only, or both. How you have things set up in the Ox app and your Quartet settings will dictate how things are panned.

There is one annoying thing about this process. I need to have a USB hub running all the time when I'm in Logic due to using an external hard drive, iLok dongle, USB keyboard, etc. The USB hubs are known to prevent not only the Ox app, but many wifi-enabled apps, from keeping connection because there is some kind of interference with 2 ghz wifi and USB hubs. I haven't tried looking into different hubs but I may need to, because I have no choice but to tweak my tones through the Ox app before firing up the rest of my recording rig.
Strange my usb hubs are always going and I’ve never had an issue connecting the Ox app. Maybe because it is on the other side of my space
 




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