Uncirculated 1960 Burst discovered in the UK

WordMan

Wax Rhapsodic
Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
10,813
If Bonamassa has some cash left a clean 1960 has re-surfaced in Paris (serial 0 2***).
Owner was a tailor who bought it to learn to play (he played it through a hifi amp), gave up in 1968 and put it away.
His family rediscovered the guitar whilst going through his belongings.

That guitar is simply ridiculous. Wow.
 

Spiritbro77

Member
Messages
28
Good for Joe. I hope he enjoys his new guitar. I supposed his selling it on will depend on if he falls in love with it or not. Or if something he covets, even more, comes on the market. Either way, I really appreciate his love of vintage guitars. I like how he actually uses them and lets people see them in action. I was originally not a fan of his playing but it has since grown on me and I dig it now. But even if you don't, he has done a lot for the vintage guitar scene and for the blues. He seems an earnest and sincere guy who works very hard and spends his money on a vast guitar and amp collection. Again, good for him.
 

TAA

Member
Messages
74
Village idiot here needs help…..what is the definition of a “burst”? Thanks!
 

59Jazzmaster

Member
Messages
719
I heard JB play twice. He's an underrated guitarist. Technical mastery doesn't impress me, I mean emotional content. And some really cool techniques I've scarcely heard.

I love vintage guitars but I don't care who buys them and I am happier if their price falls than rises because this means they are that much more accessible to me and other guitarists.

This one is a really beautiful guitar.
 

ukulelelab

Member
Messages
43
more info about the clean '60 burst (0 2185) recently discovered in France can be read there (it is still for sale):
It was originally traded in for a suit (!)

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TAA

Member
Messages
74
After checking out #44 above, the key feature/appeal of the “burst” appears to be the character of the wood grain pattern on the top. Reminds me of some rifles. When you order the rifle, some manufacturers allow you to choose (and pay for) the quality of the wood in the stock and fore arm. For example, one manufacturer has different wood grade options such as….standard, semi-fancy, extra-fancy and presentation. Even after-market wood suppliers of stocks and fore arms give the purchaser the choice of different grade levels of wood.

Kind of funny, while shooting at a match, other shooters walk up to look at your rifle and the first comment they utter is….…”boy is that ever great looking wood”. They don’t look at the metal finish, the scope, the target you just shot, but first thing is the wood. Guitar guys seem to be a lot like shooters and their version of eye candy…..it’s the wood, man, the wood!

Gibson doesn’t give the purchaser the option, you get what they have on hand at the time. And in a given window of time, the wood in inventory can vary from what was used last year and can vary from what will be used next year….. the luck of the draw.

Tom
 

Guitarworks

Member
Messages
12,164

Yeah finding this LP is like treasure hunters finding a sunken galleon. I feel as though I'm watching three American gearheads going over an old ex+ condition time capsule Mopar, opening the hood, opening the trunk, putting it up on a lift, crawling around the interior, etc. You'd never guess without hearing them speak that they're French guys who love 50s US guitar culture. They used an old, faded US flag as a tablecloth (!).
 

Jazzandmore

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
13,314
more info about the clean '60 burst (0 2185) recently discovered in France can be read there (it is still for sale):
It was originally traded in for a suit (!)

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The thing is, this story is quite ordinary, up until the very end.

Guy buys something he wants, likely as a hobby. Life happens and now he needs to sell it to get something he needs. The bartering thing is pretty cool. I’m guessing that was not uncommon at that time.

Next guy gets this fun thing from the barter and decides he will have a hobby. Once again Life happens, and the hobby item is stored away and forgotten.

After death, the son is clearing out dad’s stuff (I’m sure plenty of us have had that experience in life), not expecting anything out of the ordinary. Of course he finds old stuff stashed away, but who expects their parents old stuff to be valuable? Especially since we don’t recall our parents collecting anything, or being into any “cool stuff that will be valuable one day”. [As a kid I was into comics and often thought how cool it would have been if my grandfather had bought a copy of the first Superman comic when he was younger, and had of kept it.]

Then this particular story gets very interesting because of what the son finds AND because he mentioned it to a friend rather than just assuming it was worthless and getting rid of it for pennies.
 

sws1

Member
Messages
12,892
The thing is, this story is quite ordinary, up until the very end.

Guy buys something he wants, likely as a hobby. Life happens and now he needs to sell it to get something he needs. The bartering thing is pretty cool. I’m guessing that was not uncommon at that time.

Next guy gets this fun thing from the barter and decides he will have a hobby. Once again Life happens, and the hobby item is stored away and forgotten.

After death, the son is clearing out dad’s stuff (I’m sure plenty of us have had that experience in life), not expecting anything out of the ordinary. Of course he finds old stuff stashed away, but who expects their parents old stuff to be valuable? Especially since we don’t recall our parents collecting anything, or being into any “cool stuff that will be valuable one day”. [As a kid I was into comics and often thought how cool it would have been if my grandfather had bought a copy of the first Superman comic when he was younger, and had of kept it.]

Then this particular story gets very interesting because of what the son finds AND because he mentioned it to a friend rather than just assuming it was worthless and getting rid of it for pennies.

And unless there are pictures/receipts, etc showing that this stuff is true, it's useless (albeit colorful) here-say.
 

Sirloin

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
17,567
If Bonamassa has some cash left a clean 1960 has re-surfaced in Paris (serial 0 2***).
Owner was a tailor who bought it to learn to play (he played it through a hifi amp), gave up in 1968 and put it away.
His family rediscovered the guitar whilst going through his belongings.

Seeing these old guitar get taken apart and reassembled bugs the sh$t outta me.
 

Spiritbro77

Member
Messages
28
After checking out #44 above, the key feature/appeal of the “burst” appears to be the character of the wood grain pattern on the top. Reminds me of some rifles. When you order the rifle, some manufacturers allow you to choose (and pay for) the quality of the wood in the stock and fore arm. For example, one manufacturer has different wood grade options such as….standard, semi-fancy, extra-fancy and presentation. Even after-market wood suppliers of stocks and fore arms give the purchaser the choice of different grade levels of wood.

Kind of funny, while shooting at a match, other shooters walk up to look at your rifle and the first comment they utter is….…”boy is that ever great looking wood”. They don’t look at the metal finish, the scope, the target you just shot, but first thing is the wood. Guitar guys seem to be a lot like shooters and their version of eye candy…..it’s the wood, man, the wood!

Gibson doesn’t give the purchaser the option, you get what they have on hand at the time. And in a given window of time, the wood in inventory can vary from what was used last year and can vary from what will be used next year….. the luck of the draw.

Tom
Gibson gives you a wood option. But through their custom shop. I can't find it at the moment but there is a video on Youtube of Joe Bonamassa picking out the top and the mahogany back for a custom shop Les Paul in a brick-and-mortar store. If you call them up to order one, they likely send photos of tops and backs for you to choose from. The same goes for guns. For standard rifles etc you get what you get but if you special order a custom-made gun you get choices.
 

Yamaha 1421

Member
Messages
1,598
For those that haven't seen it, the YouTube Part 3 handover to Joe Bonamassa.


One of those guys in the video is Ronny Proler who is one of the original "Burst" Collectors from way back in the day..................he knows his stuff and has and has owned some incredible vintage Les Paul "Sunbursts".
 

TAA

Member
Messages
74
#57 makes sense. My only point of reference goes back to 1967 when I ordered my L-5C with a Johnny Smith pickup. There was no discussion about wood choices….way back then. And I was 19 when I did that.

Tom
 

Auk

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
448
Good for him. I love it when anything old gets pulled out and USED in the manner it was built for. Nobody building instruments did so with the hopes that it would be stored away and only gazed upon.
 




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