Upcoming security updates will likely slow down your Intel-based Mac/PC by 30%

Discussion in 'The Pub' started by Jimmy_Rage, Jan 3, 2018.


  1. Jimmy_Rage

    Jimmy_Rage Member

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    Basically those bast*rds have been stealing Hollywood celeb photos for years. Probably yours too. Oh, and while you were waxing the dolphin, "somebody" was probably watching. Yipee Kai Yay, mothaloverz.


    BLOOMBERG – Advanced Micro Devices Inc. surged in early trading after a report that Intel Corp., its only remaining rival in the market for personal computer processors, has a flaw in its products that makes commonly used operating systems vulnerable to hackers.

    According to technology website The Register, Intel has a bug that lets some software gain access to parts of a computer’s memory that are set aside to protect things like passwords. All computers with Intel chips from the past 10 years appear to be affected, the report said, and patches to Microsoft Corp.’s Windows and Apple Inc.’s OS X operating systems will be required. The security updates may slow down older machinery by as much as 30 percent, according to the report.

    “This is a black eye for Intel and a natural beneficiary is AMD in the arms race on the chip side,” said Dan Ives, head of tech research at GBH Insights. “Especially as you’ve seen an ultracompetitive environment with a slowing traditional PC chip cycle, this is a step back, this is a potential PR nightmare. They need to get ahead of this and try to contain any of the damage to customers as well to the brand.” AMD shares surged as much as 7.2 percent to $11.77 Wednesday. Intel fell as much as 3.8 percent, the most since April, to $45.05. An Intel spokesman declined to comment.

    Flaws in the designs of microprocessors, which go through rigorous testing and verification, are rare and usually are easily fixed by patches in the code that they use to communicate with the rest of the computer. If the error can’t be fixed easily in software, chip redesigns are extremely costly and time consuming. Historically, the way companies respond to the issue and how quickly they address it has determined how big a problem it becomes.

    Intel’s microprocessors are the fundamental building block of the internet, corporate networks and PCs. The company has added to its designs over the years trying to make computers less vulnerable to attack, arguing that hardware security is typically tougher to crack than software.

    The Santa Clara, California-based company’s chips have more than 80 percent market share overall and more than 90 percent in laptops and servers.

    Programmers have been working for two months to try to patch the flaw in open-source Linux system, The Register said, adding that Microsoft was expected to release a patch for the issue soon.
     
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  2. hellbender

    hellbender Member

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    Data doesn’t matta.
     
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  3. Jimmy_Rage

    Jimmy_Rage Member

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    In Sector R, you mean? Sabotaging companies and people, manipulating the stock market, pinpointing potential troublemakers and neutralising them?
     
  4. aynirar27

    aynirar27 All You Need Is Rock and Roll Gold Supporting Member

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  5. Jimmy_Rage

    Jimmy_Rage Member

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    Despacito using your computer, you mean? Bieber touched it and it's gold, baby.

    At any rate, enjoy while they watch as you struggle with your 30 per cent slower computer.

    30 per cent is what they tell you at any rate. Look at those Apple batteries.

    Man, it's like living in Sin City, and I don't mean Vegas.

    "Oh gee, boss, I don't know how that happened."

    "This is why I can't entrust responsibility to you. Mr tall, blonde, suspiciously stereotypical looking and untrustworthy in bar situations gets your raise. He also went to an Ivy League University that wouldn't accept you."
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2018
  6. Hefalump

    Hefalump Member

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  7. PBGas

    PBGas Supporting Member

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    With all of the technology and programming skills out there today, they can’t figure out how to do this without harming the speed of the CPU? Seriously, to me it sounds more like an excuse to have people buy a new computer.
     
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  8. Beto

    Beto Supporting Member

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    I'm sure that anyone who watched me during my intimate moments killed himself right after.
     
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  9. wetordry

    wetordry Member

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    Young guys and technology...
     
  10. fe911

    fe911 Supporting Member

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    Intel makes great chips, but, they are in an arms race right now with AMD. They definitely didn't need anything like this. I know that when I built my recent computer I was on the fence, but went with Intel for a few reasons. This would
    have swayed the decision towards AMD . But, it's a Windows machine, and the last thing I ever do on it is enter important information. I don't even log into eBay on it, or anywhere else for that matter.
    I also built an AMD machine for work. We run all of our book work with it. For what I do with them, they are way overkill.
     
  11. guitz

    guitz Supporting Member

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    I wonder if they only became aware of the vulnerability after a hacking attack..this is a pretty big deal for Intel users...the choices are live with it (unless MS forces an 'auto' OS update/patch, which the article says can fix it, albeit slow your machine down) or wait until Intel builds new chips without the flaw, since it's at the hardware/kernel memory level, which can potentially expose everything from passwords to your content . Wow.

    Edit - just read there is no 'known' exploitation of the flaw, so maybe Intel caught it.
     
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2018
  12. forum_crawler

    forum_crawler Member

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    There is no mention of hard numbers there, just conjecture.
    I think people have other things on their computers that are more likely to affect their performance.
     
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  13. centuryx3

    centuryx3 Member

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    Thank Dog I use a mid 2007 MB Pro. Chipset is apparently too old to be of interest to hackers.
     
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  14. VCuomo

    VCuomo Gold Supporting Member

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    Now that the existence of this flaw is public knowledge, I would be more concerned about the security aspects of it than the performance impacts.
     
  15. LittleWiggler

    LittleWiggler Member

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    I'ts the 90's all over again.
    90's: Intel getting nailed on the floating point flaw on their Pentium chips. AMD tries to take advantage...
    Today: Intel getting nailed for a security flaw. AMD tries to take advantage.

    I was an AMD fanboi in the 90's, but eventually moved back to Intel processors. I don't know if I would bet the money on AMD's new product lines since they have been unable to really challenge Intel and they have a tendency to EOL products a bit quicker than Intel.
     
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  16. Social Exodus

    Social Exodus Lone Wolf Silver Supporting Member

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    :spit

    Meanwhile, AMD is dancing while waxing THEIR dolphins.
     
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  17. Bradmeister

    Bradmeister Member

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    Anybody seen a technical article about this? I'd be interested in knowing exactly what the flaw is. Seems like the the OS can just move where things like passwords are stored and/or just encrypt that part of the shared memory. If encryption isn't by the OSs in question already, that's a bad design for any kind of security. 30% reduction makes it sound like this stuff is kept in on-board cache and would have to be randomized, but that would just be the password storage stuff, not every process.

    Seems like a sensational article to me.
     
  18. Hari Seldon

    Hari Seldon Member

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    I think we should keep cool. In a german article they reported tests with Linux-Kernel 4.14.11 benchmark tests showed no salience.
    One reader commet said "in a home computer with 4 cores 2 are always idle. Maybe in future there's only one"

    I never liked Intel...I was a fan of PPC (Mac) 'til they got lost. Now I use linux, at least this is the most reliable system.
     
  19. guitz

    guitz Supporting Member

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    This is as detailed as I've found...

    "Impact
    It is understood the bug is present in modern Intel processors produced in the past decade. It allows normal user programs – from database applications to JavaScript in web browsers – to discern to some extent the layout or contents of protected kernel memory areas.
    The fix is to separate the kernel's memory completely from user processes using what's called Kernel Page Table Isolation, or KPTI. At one point, Forcefully Unmap Complete Kernel With Interrupt Trampolines, aka ****WIT, was mulled by the Linux kernel team, giving you an idea of how annoying this has been for the developers."

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/01/02/intel_cpu_design_flaw/
     
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  20. MassProducedDreamer

    MassProducedDreamer Member

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    loving this. I'm all AMD. Out of 3000+ computers at work I have one of the only AMDs
     

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