US Music is shutting down Parker USA.

Discussion in 'Guitars in General' started by PiRaSSiC, Jan 30, 2016.

  1. technomancer

    technomancer Supporting Member

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    I haven't heard anything about them finding a new facility.
     
  2. RayBarbeeMusic

    RayBarbeeMusic Member

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    The ergonomics never worked for me, but they were innovative before the company was sold. Stainless frets with no tang glued to the board though....that I never understood. Re-fret nightmare.
     
  3. PiRaSSiC

    PiRaSSiC Member

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    You never need to refret. Mine are almost 20 years old and they have no wear on the frets.
    NO wear.
     
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  4. 9fingers

    9fingers Supporting Member

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    The reason for the tangless frets is that (under Ken), they got the carbon fiber fingerboards perfectly flat, then glued the frets on with precise sized little (glass I think) beads under them, it seems I remember .003" in size, and special adhesive, allowing for a perfectly level super hard stainless fret top surface with no filing or leveling. The beads acted as little spacers allowing enough glue to stay under the frets to securely bond them, preventing all the glue from simply squeezing out. KP also did not want the structural and vibrational integrity of the carbon fiber board compromised by fret slots. Ken really re-engineered a lot of guitar making with the Fly. Things like that little bit are why is so hard for someone else to step in & make them. These are not regular 1950s designs and construction.

    I have had no trouble and zero wear on my two 20 year old Flys.
     
    Cal Webway likes this.
  5. VaughnC

    VaughnC Supporting Member

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    I really tried to like the Fly's I owned. I gave them sufficient gigging time and, when I eventually played a good Strat again, I realized I should have stayed in Stratville. I kinda liked the way the Fly played and their light weight was a nice factor...but the tone just wasn't right to my ears. Still, I wished I would have kept the mahogany body one I had for a change of pace, alternative sound.
     
  6. PiRaSSiC

    PiRaSSiC Member

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    I have recently acquired a Nitefly and it's very stratty. It is on par with my Suhr Classic, only a little bit more "hi-fi" due to the noiseless pickups. I'm sure an upgrade to diMarzio Areas would give it the extra glassiness for "proper" strat sound.
     
  7. Jayyj

    Jayyj Supporting Member

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    Parkers are pretty much the polar opposite of what I usually like in a guitar... but I've always loved them because of this:

     
  8. Eagle1

    Eagle1 Member

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    Ken Parker deserves big credit for trying to push forward the design or the electric guitar whether you like the instrument or not.
    Some parts I do but it was not a fully thought out instrument.
    I'd still rather this than another name less company chunking out strat and Tele copies with no innovation what so ever.
     
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  9. Cal Webway

    Cal Webway Member

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    Wonder how many signature Parkers Adrian Belew has now that Parker is no more?
     
  10. guitarnut_1

    guitarnut_1 Member

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    I think the era of "revolutionary" guitar designs is more or less over .... at least for me. Give me a 50's or an early 60's design and that's all I need/ love. MOdern designs just make me shake my head. And I am in my late 30's at the moment.

    I love Hamer guitars and they were designed in the 70's for instance... but BASED on good old things and shapes that we all love.

    This could possibly play OK, but it just looks aweful to my eyes:

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Help!I'maRock!

    Help!I'maRock! Member

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    Aweful? As I you are in awe of its awesomeness? In that case, I agree! It is AWESOME!
     
  12. mikeratan00

    mikeratan00 Member

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    or Mark Farner[​IMG]
     
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  13. guitarnut_1

    guitarnut_1 Member

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    as with many things, beauty is in the eye of the beholder ;)
     
  14. Help!I'maRock!

    Help!I'maRock! Member

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    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. SPELLING isn't. :p
     
  15. lowyaw

    lowyaw Member

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    you must be kidding
    it's beautriful. puts that chubby LP shape to shame
     
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  16. Average Joe

    Average Joe Member

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    Sorry to hear it. The original design was perhaps the most perfectly designed solidbody in an engineering sense. I think they got hit by the vintage craze that's been plaguing guitardom for decades now.

    I also think they were remarkably beautiful.

    I hope they will keep up producing spare parts, or that some other manufacturer will. A lot of those parts arent generic
     
    PiRaSSiC likes this.
  17. buddaman71

    buddaman71 Student of Life Silver Supporting Member

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    i had an original Fly Deluxe. it was perfectly made and i desperately wanted to love it, but it was soulless and generic-sounding. just an uninspiring guitar to play and the uber flat/thin neck was the complete opposite of everything i prefer
     
  18. thiscalltoarms

    thiscalltoarms more gadgets than Batman. Gold Supporting Member

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    If only there was a bigger necked model. I love the tones, but give it to me with a baseball bat neck or you can't have my money as a general principle.
     
  19. DeVilleDude

    DeVilleDude Member

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    A good friend has a US made Fly he bought early on.
    It hangs in the wall in his studio, and he gigs his CV tele with a 5k board plugged into his Mesa Trans Atlantic.
    I played his Parker a lot over the years when I'd visit. As good as the specs looked on paper, I could never bond w it. Apparently, neither could he. But I've seen many good players make them sound great.
     
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  20. DrewH

    DrewH Member

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    I don't want to pick on you but this post is one of the main problems with the guitar community. People want everything to sound like a 59 LP, 57 Strat, Tele, etc. If it doesn't its "soul-less".

    The soul comes from the player. The guitar only channels that soul. Occasionally I'll see someone play a fly at a local gig. I've heard some downright heavenly tones come out of those things.

    Here is some food for thought. Had the fly been invented in the 50s and the Les Paul in the 90's, you'd call the Les Paul soul-less.
     
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