Use of impulse responses to alter fundamental guitar tone

Discussion in 'Digital & Modeling Gear' started by MKB, May 5, 2015.

  1. MKB

    MKB Silver Supporting Member

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    We are all familiar with the use of tone controls and EQ pedals to sculpt the basic tone of an electric guitar; give it more highs, lows, mids, cut shrillness, etc. But has anyone used impulse responses to do the same thing, and perhaps make a guitar sound more like a different guitar?

    If I understand the process, the Fishman Aura uses IR's to make the tone of an electric/acoustic sound more like a mic'd acoustic. The following is a link to a site where an acoustic was recorded with an IR from a banjo, with impressive results:

    https://ccrma.stanford.edu/~jiffer8/420/project.html

    One can imagine how you could take a fairly neutral tone from a piezo guitar pickup and send it through the right IR, and have it then sound much like a different instrument. Maybe Roland's COSM guitar simulation as well as the Variax has a little of this tech in them?

    Perhaps there is a process where you can take an impulse response of the magnetic pickups of a guitar (say a Gretsch), also at the same time record a neutral piezo signal from the Gretsch's bridge (hopefully to be as neutral in response as possible), deconvolve the magnetic pickup recording with the piezo recording, and then that pickup coloring in the IR could be used to make say a Les Paul have more Gretsch characteristics.

    Anyone heard of such a thing? It might be easier to make IR's and feed them into an EPSi than go through pickup swaps to get a particular tone.
     
  2. Multicellular

    Multicellular Supporting Member

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    I have played around in that neighborhood.

    The guitar melody at 2:50 here was run thru an IR I made with a cheap 1960s radio.
    https://americansinner.bandcamp.com/track/bloodshed-blues

    Making an IR of a piezo might be hard. I guess you could put a speaker on the instrument and do a sine sweep. But that introduces much more of the body than the piezo pickup does by itself.

    Also, if you run a signal thru a pickup IR, are you not running the guitar signal thru two pickups? one real, one virtual?

    Accordingly, I would sortof think you'd want to go the route of the Antares Mic Modelor, it let you plug in what mic was used, it would then try to undo the coloration, and then you told it which mic you wanted to use, and it did its thing.
     

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