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Used Redplates-What is your experience? Sellers and Buyers.

ocripes

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
1,320
I'm looking at a few. I'm wondering what you might've encountered in terms of the following:

Normal wear and tear: How have these held up?

Support from builder: If you've had questions/issues can you got input/assistance/repair from Redplate?

After market changes: Have you swapped out speakers, tubes? If so, why?

Sellers: How have you done with resale value?

Nothing would please me more than buying brand new, but I can't swing it. I would like to have one though.
 

jklotz

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
3,845
Well, for starters, they are built like tanks. I have put mune through many gigs and rehersals, and it's as tight as the day I got it.

Also, Henry, the builder, has been very responsive everytime I've needed something. He never asked where I bought it, or if I was the original owner.

Mine is just a head (truverb), but I've left it bone stock. Why change anything? It's perfect as is!
 

Darl

Member
Messages
1,958
I just bought a used combo (and am already gassing to try another Redplate flavor) and I searched for a few months. I found that asking prices are quite high relative to realistic selling prices. A lot of guys are asking 2k and higher for the common models but I think when stuff sells it's closer to 1600 or maybe less. There was a cool Rockmachine head for sale which is like a one drive version of the Astro dust (I think) without Reverb and that sat for a long while with asking price 1300. When I sell my CDS2 combo - which I inevitably will do because I want to try some other red plates as well - I'll probably list it at 1500 because I think realistically that's where I can sell it.

I contacted Keith at Redplate and he said welcome to the Redplate family and send me the chassis or combo amp and he's happily go over it and bring it to spec as needed. They are top notch customer service.

I absolutely love the CDS2 by the way. It's exactly what you want in a "hot rodded" fender and the portability is excellent.
 

Bluewail

Tone curmudgeon
Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,969
I bought a used Blackverb a while back and it was, and sill is, a rock solid amp. Highly recommended. I'd say no worries buying used.
 

Gary Brennan

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
1,871
Have a RP50 head, Henry/Keith have been really excellent with advice, and with a foot switch problem (not their fault, just a flaky switch). I did change tubes to NOS/ANOS but I always do, just think most new mfg brands sound mid congested, and frequently harsh on top. Was the same with my Glaswerks SOD. I love this amp.

Gb
 

warren3333

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
3,538
@ocripes - with Redplates, I think it takes some time to 'get your head around them', in two ways;

1.) how they work
2.) the wide range of amp choices

Ive owned 5 or 6 Redplates (RPs), and Im probably well served to comment as I had problems with one of them. i live in the UK, where there was only one Redplate dealer at the time. I purchased a new Blackverb combo, but later swopped it because I thought it was too heavy... Ive since learnt that;

Heavier amps = bigger transformers = better sound & feel

A generalisation I know, but I still believe the 'best' RPs are the larger RP50, CDS3, Blackverb etc.

Anyway, back to the plot ! I then had a CDS2 in black, but ordered a CDS2 in wheat/blonde with a matching cab. Long story short - there was tremedous problems with this one; primarily based around the Lo Master master volume. (It has since acknowledged, I'm led to believe, that there were some issues with a small batch).

Anyway, both Keith and Henry were helpful, but I moved the amp on. Redplate days over...

Ive tried and purchased several many amps - Carr (still own the glorious Rambler), Magnatone, TK, Jim Kelley, Matchless (luvvely), Lazy J, Dr Z, Mesa etc etc etc.

But you know what...? The sound of the Blackverb and CDS2 live haunted me. It really did. Never got close to it, and it matched the 'sound in my head'... but I was scarred by that previous experience.

Then, over the past 12 months, I started clearing out, sorting, selling my gear (and life I guess) and began to think about ending the endless GAS. The conclusion was to get back that glorious Redplate sound. So, I started looking and was really after a (still rare in the UK) head. I fancied the RP40/50 option, due to the tweed AND Blackface pre amp option.

Then, I spotted a gorgeous blonde RP50R head, but in Germany at the excellent GuitarLoop dealer. Sure, it wasnt cheap but I just this move was right. The service was incredible from Torsten and the good people at Guitar Loop http://guitarloop.de/

So, here it is ! I need to get a 1x12 cab, and Im delighted with this amp.

The real STRENGTH of RPs for me, is the ability to choose your cleans; then 'clip' them, add more bloom, add more mids, add a boost, add drive.... ALL FROM THE FOOTSWITCH.

The amp is so good, that I've just sold my Lazy J J20, and I never thought that would happen. It works well in my small 2 bedroom home, and Ive yet to gig it, but I know from experience it will spring to life !!

I've contacted Keith recently, and he has simply been a delight to deal with.

Very happy, very excited, and very grateful to have nailed 'my' sound with this glorious amp !!

Feel free to ask me, or any of the many Redplaters on here, any questions mate...

http://s1160.photobucket.com/user/Warren3333/media/IMG_0012_1.jpg.html][/URL]
 
Last edited:

Darl

Member
Messages
1,958
Agreed, they are not for everyone and the hype was overdone (as it always is). if you go in thinking it's a blackface or tweed (or both) with master volume, fx loop, channel switching and more extensive eq flexibility- then I doubt you'll be disappointed. But it's not a dumble, it's not a Marshall - and they are not high gain amps despite what the advertising says. There's plenty of gain on tap but not the type we use for hard rock and metal. but of course a good pedal can get you any drive sound you want these days.
 

macmax77

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
13,165
I'm looking at a few. I'm wondering what you might've encountered in terms of the following:

Normal wear and tear: How have these held up?
Great!!! And mine has been in two countries since I shipped it and used it both in the USA and Caribbean.

Support from builder: If you've had questions/issues can you got input/assistance/repair from Redplate?
Great!!! Henry will do whatever is in his hands to help you and accommodate you!

After market changes: Have you swapped out speakers, tubes? If so, why?
I tried to change speakers, then I realized I had a head, Why? Because I am a bit of an idiot!

Sellers: How have you done with resale value?
Will never sell

Nothing would please me more than buying brand new, but I can't swing it. I would like to have one though.
I would buy with confidence!
 
Messages
1,330
In my experience, here are some positive generalizations:

The amps are expensive new, so the folks who are willing to plop down that money are also the same people willing to take exquisite care of their investment. So they are often found in pristine shape in the used market.

They're superbly well built so this adds to the likelihood that you'll find one in great shape in the used market. Super rare that they're all beat up.

They're, in my opinion, over engineered to the point of being too much amp for a lot of folks. Even Henry's 'simple' models still have that extra gain boost or pull-pot that can get you that one extra sound that isn't even mentioned in the description. This can be good and bad. Like Mesa amps - lots of switches and options - sometimes too many, imo. And I'm a person who loves options.

Lastly, I bought my Magic Dust Duo 100 watt on the used market and even so, Henry was very prompt and thorough in correspondence answering my questions - EXCELLENT customer service, even if I didn't buy new.

I think that if I ever bought another, it would be an RP50.
 

Spider-Man

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
5,657
Like Mesa amps - lots of switches and options - sometimes too many, imo. And I'm a person who loves options.
But this should not deter potential buyers, IMO. Unlike Mesa amps, the switches and options are not super finicky and hard to dial in. I have owed a few different Mesa amps and always found them very hard to dial in. With the Redplates, the switches and options seem to be better designed to help you fine tune the tones to make a good sound great.
 

Ramblin Hymns

Member
Messages
696
Some people just make them hard. All they are is a tweed or blackface channel or both with the od in the amp instead of using a pedal on the floor. All the knobs just intimidate people. If so just don't use the od and buy a pedal, then use just the amp section. That would cut down on the knobs to be used. You would be losing a lot though. I have 4 RP's and had a fifth that I sold.
 

kwicked

Senior Member
Messages
3,669
But this should not deter potential buyers, IMO. Unlike Mesa amps, the switches and options are not super finicky and hard to dial in. I have owed a few different Mesa amps and always found them very hard to dial in. With the Redplates, the switches and options seem to be better designed to help you fine tune the tones to make a good sound great.
Very much agree with this. I generally hate having too many options- pedals with a ton of knobs, mesa amps, you get the picture. My only experience is with the Blackverb, but i found it very easy to dial in and the push/pull and switches etc are very intuitive and it is easy to get into a good spot and then make mild and, maybe more importantly, easily and quickly reversible adjustments rather than it being like starting over every time you turn a dial. The mode selector is amazing, letting you go from Blackface to thicker blackface to tweed quickly while leaving your tone controls as you like them. Lots of output options too for different speaker/cab configurations, but again, very easy to figure out and use. Just wonderful, versatile amps well priced new compared to other quality makers and a smokin value on the used market IMO.
 

reddog112

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
1,756
I have owned my Cosmic Dust combo for six years or so. I bought new and have been playing the thing hard since the day I bought it. I've corresponded with Henry and Keith many times and they're great to deal with and fair. I sent my amp in recently and Keith updated it to current specs for a very fair price. These people build them right and care that their products sound good.

When I get the amp up to gig/rehearsal volume it is so much fun. There are lots of tones to be had, but the amp can be as simple as you want it to be.

Buy with confidence, these are good people
 

jimpridx

Silver Supporting Member
Messages
2,534
I'd have to agree with everything that's been said here. I recently purchased a used RP40, and it's a great little amp! While the amp sounded great from the get-go, I did swap out a couple of preamp tubes as well as swapping out the stock V30 speaker, but those are only basic mods to suit my preferences. I wouldn't have any hesitation at all in buying a used RedPlate.
 

Lance

Gold Supporting Member
Messages
10,871
I had a 50W Rock Machine head. I really dug it, and had some fun playing it. Then I got a Two Rock and it just suited my needs better. I liked the clean channel a bit more. The 5-way selector thing and tweed boost was useless to me. I always left it on the 1st BF setting. Unlike a lot of guitar players, all that additional low end just eff's up everything. Most players go for that fat low end sound, because they think it warms up the tone. However, that just screws with the bass player. Then, he turns up. Then you turn up etc...it turns into a fight for frequency occupation. Believe it or not, most studio engineers instantly hit guitar tracks with a low pass filter & remove pretty much everything below 200 Hz.

I don't use the tone stack bypass boost on the Two Rock either, as I usually have my bass knob on zero. Ultimately, the Two Rock & I sold the used RM for $1400. I needed to move it quickly, so priced it accordingly.
 

kwicked

Senior Member
Messages
3,669
The 5-way selector thing and tweed boost was useless to me. I always left it on the 1st BF setting. Unlike a lot of guitar players, all that additional low end just eff's up everything.
How does that make it useless? What if the amp had been voiced on the 3rd setting with no selector? You probably wouldn't have dug it. Not using it all the time doesn't mean its a useless option.
 

ProfRhino

Member
Messages
8,622
All I can do is echo the praise.
Found me a nice used Astrodust last year, it sounds exactly like Hermans' fine clips (minus the player, unfortunately) - nuff said.
I find it super easy to dial in, all you have to understand is where everything is located in the signal path, it makes total sense.
And service - top notch. Mine arrived with a minor issue (probably shipping related), Keith went out of his way to help my tech fix it asap.
Imho one of the very best amps of its kind you can find today, anywhere ! :aok

Believe it or not, most studio engineers instantly hit guitar tracks with a low pass filter & remove pretty much everything below 200 Hz.
absolutely, everybody does (although 200 Hz is usually too high imho).
However - the response and feel of a full bodied amp is way different than a tight, wiry one - I personally prefer dealing with this at the mixing stage, not in the amp.
But this certainly depends on style and personal preference.

ymmv,
Rhino
 

ProfRhino

Member
Messages
8,622
... and some specifics, personal opinion only :
  • cab - 2x Gold or Gold + vintage H30/55 preferred, it sounds great through any quality cab, not picky at all, but it responds directly to the cab differences
  • tubes - unexpectedly modern upmarket MIC 6L6 (TAD, GT etc) work great, I put an old Telefunken long plate in the PI, a Telefunken ECC803S in V1 and Mullard i63 in both OD stages, the rest is stock
  • unless you're absolutely volume challenged and need 6V6, I'd suggest going with the 50W option if possible, it sounds considerably fuller ime, and you can always switch to 40W cathode bias if desired.
  • and since nothing is ever 100% perfect, 3 tiny little details that could be improved, super minor in fact :
the 40W switch is too close to the standby, you always have to feel twice
the preamp tube sockets are way too tight to be comfortable
a 2nd (black) connector for bias measurement would be nice

ymmv,
Rhino
 






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