using a parallel loop as a series loop?

Discussion in 'Amps/Cabs Tech Corner: Amplifier, Cab & Speakers' started by music321, Mar 28, 2015.

  1. music321

    music321 Member

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    It seems that there are two types of loops that an amp can have: series and parallel. It seems that a parallel loop would be nice, since you could essentially get a wet/dry sound through one driver. Of course, you could do this the traditional wet/dry way (with another amp), then you lose the option of having a serial loop (for which there are quite a few uses).

    It seems that one way around this is to turn the balance on a parallel loop (assuming it's a parallel loop that has this option) all the way to one side, so that ONLY the wet signal is coming through. This would be, in effect, a series loop.

    Would doing this have disadvantages relative to a regular series loop? I mean, if you have a parallel loop set all the way to one side, would the series loop somehow sound better?
     
  2. music321

    music321 Member

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  3. drbob1

    drbob1 Silver Supporting Member

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    I don't think there's a huge amount of difference, although you'll often get a slight leak of dry volume with the knob turned full wet. I don't actually have any parallel loops that have a balance control that goes fully wet, are you aware of one?

    A series loop is easier to game, since you can make a parallel blender pretty easy.
     
  4. Motterpaul

    Motterpaul Tone is in the Ears

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    Here is where I come down on this - most of the effects that I end up wanting in my loop are made to be full-on, not blended effects. They are "boost, delay, Reverb and "EQ". Reverb and delay pedals are "blended pedals" so you get some "original" sound going through them by design. In a parallel loop you have to turn them on a lot harder, which can overdrive them.

    If you have an EQ pedal in the loop, you don't want the original guitar going through your sound as well, that defeats the purpose. That is just an example.

    So - yes, IF you have a parallel loop where you can just set it full on it is the same as having a series loop. But why bother - just get a series loop.

    And remember that not all effects go in the loop. The chorus, phaser, limiter and whatever can also go upfront. usually the wah, also, because they are design to match (ohmage) guitar pickups, not the output of loop circuits.
     
  5. TimmyP

    TimmyP Member

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    If the sound is entirely dependent on the return from the FX unit, it is a series* loop, and the FX unit should be set for the desired blend of dry and wet.

    If the return from the FX unit is blended with the original sound in the amp, it's a parallel loop, in which case the FX unit should be set to fully wet. If a parallel loop has the ability to kill the dry signal in the amp, I'd consider that to be rather peculiar. But I can see where it might be handy, as it is in that case a fake series loop (as was stated).
     
    Last edited: Mar 31, 2015
  6. music321

    music321 Member

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    As for who actually makes a parallel loop with a blend adjustment, I assumed that it wasn't extremely rare (though I've never seen one). I took this impression from something I read at one time. Maybe it wasn't accurate. Maybe they don't exist.

    I think cruisemates gets to the heart of the issue, which is that a series loop is more practical than a parallel loop.
     

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