Using delay, live???

AxeVictim52

Member
The reasons why you might be finding delays clutter or muddy up your band's sound is probably because you are misusing the effect or using the wrong type of delay for your situation. or perhaps it just isn't an appropriate effect to be using for the music you're playing?

Like everything - It all depends on what you need for your band's sound - Everything has it's place otherwise there would be no need for it to exist, but you might not be in that place right now. I've played in bands where delays were totally unnecessary, I've played in bands where chorus was completely inappropriate and cheesey, but I'm currently playing in a band where these effects produce just the right sonic texture to capture the atmosphere of a lot of the songs. I've played in bands where any fx at all were excessive and all I really needed was to plug the guitar straight into the front of an overdriven amp, but if I did that in either of the bands I'm currently playing guitar in, It would sound like there's something missing, a lot of the time.
 

DrJamie

Member
When I was playing pop/rock, I often used a "touch" of delay to thicken my sound. As I transitioned into originals, Americana rock(Los Lobos for example), I rarely used it. I have an Analog Man duel delay for long and short foot switchable changes, but I really miss my old Boss DD-2 digital delay. In very small amounts, that delay was so clean, it would become invisible, like a touch of reverb that helps me play better, but is not really heard by the listener. My DD-2 finally started to malfunction. Wish there was a good repair for that pedal. They're not that $$ to buy these days, even the Japan versions like mine.
 

phoghat

Member
A little bit of dialed-in slapback is WAY better than reverb live IMO. Less dense, clearer, doesn't cloud the issue as much.

I'm not a delay junkie by any means, but I use an ARDX20 live set to an always-on slap and occasionally switch it to long delay for effect. That works perfectly for my riffrock noodling.

Of course, delay-centric music like U2 is a whole 'nother conversation.
 

cbell2112

Member
I used an older style EHC DMM on pretty much every solo and sometimes I would just leave it on all the time. I had it set with the delay time near max(500 ms), level at 50% but had the blend and feedback low(both around 7 o'clock). This would give you more of a very warm echo with some shimmer and a bit of boost and drive. Really love it and rarely changed the settings. I bought another digital delay if I want to try some longer repeats which I do think are more difficult to work with live, at least for me.
 

JoeB63

Supporting Member
Depends on how you use it. Everything in moderation I guess.
I think it also depends on the configuration of the band. In a rock trio, some delay-based "thickening/expansion" of your tone makes a lot of sense (to me, at least). In a band with a keyboard player and 3 horn players, it's probably not needed, and more than a minimal amount is likely a detractor from the quality of the band mix.

In a 2-guitar band use less than if you're the sole guitar player. In a 3 guitar band (yuck!), use it even less. IMO.
 

chandra

Member
Drown everything in time-based effects and modulation. I use so much reverb on my vocals and guitar, you can't discern what I'm saying or playing.

My delay repeats for so long, echoes from the third instrumental showcase continue into my acoustic encore.
 

jayjerry

Member
I have 2 delays. One I always leave on. It is very subtle. Just one repeat very low in the mix. In the mix you don't hear the repeat but if I turn delay off, rig sounds too dry to my ears. Other delay I have set to one repeat a little higher in the mix that I use for solos.
 

shredtrash

Silver Supporting Member
Supporting Member
I like it to add some depth to the tone. Also, when I do band stuff, I'm generally the only guitar player so I like how it expands the sound.
 

mikebat

Member
Maybe so, played solo, but that little bit of delay is not going to make any difference, once the whole band is playing along. Especially in a big room like that.
You can always turn up the delay mix once the band comes in and the crowd soaks up some of the sound. The core of his tone is the sh!t.
 

PBGas

Supporting Member
I always use delay live. For some songs its on and others off. Just depends upon what the band mix needs.
 

mattmccloskey

Supporting Member
I think it also depends on the configuration of the band. In a rock trio, some delay-based "thickening/expansion" of your tone makes a lot of sense (to me, at least). In a band with a keyboard player and 3 horn players, it's probably not needed, and more than a minimal amount is likely a detractor from the quality of the band mix.

In a 2-guitar band use less than if you're the sole guitar player. In a 3 guitar band (yuck!), use it even less. IMO.
It’s not the size of the band, it’s the arrangements and when the delay is used. I play with horn bands all the time, but it’s not like the horns are playing non-stop and the keyboard player is laying down constant 10 note chords.
 

JoeB63

Supporting Member
It’s not the size of the band, it’s the arrangements and when the delay is used. I play with horn bands all the time, but it’s not like the horns are playing non-stop and the keyboard player is laying down constant 10 note chords.
Well, sure. I was thinking of players who always like to have some delay on their tone (....uh, like me).
 


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