Value of a 58 LP Jr with a headstock repair

jstippell

Silver Supporting Member
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42
So a 58 LP Jr (double cut, red) showed up at my local shop. Long been a "dream guitar" of mine. It plays and sounds great, all original. Only thing is it has had a headstock repair. It's a good looking repair and feels great. pretty clean otherwise. Anyone have any idea what I should pay for it? Prices seem to be a little all over the map on these lately.
 

jekylmeister

Raconteur Extraordinaire
Silver Supporting Member
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3,680
So a 58 LP Jr (double cut, red) showed up at my local shop. Long been a "dream guitar" of mine. It plays and sounds great, all original. Only thing is it has had a headstock repair. It's a good looking repair and feels great. pretty clean otherwise. Anyone have any idea what I should pay for it? Prices seem to be a little all over the map on these lately.
I'm not an expert on this, but my two cents is: the headstock repair, which is not uncommon for Gibsons, would probably affect the price for collecting purposes. If it's a player, and that's what you want it for, the price ought to reflect that. Obviously, you can't sell a vintage guitar as pristine or mint if it's been broken. If it's a good repair, there's no reason it can't be a great guitar for you for a long time.
YMMV
 
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ES333

Gold Supporting Member
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1,449
I have been watching these closely, because I want one too.

$4K to $6K depending on cosmetic condition if all original and no repairs. The headstock repair, while still being a nice guitar, can devalue by half. So I am guessing $2500 would be a good price based upon your description. Maybe a little more if it really "speaks" to you.
 
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2,932
I wouldn't be afraid to put $3K into an original LP Jr with a repaired headstock, if the repair was well done. If it's stock, and doesn't need a re-fret, around $3K would be fair and reasonable. Below $2500 would be a steal.
 

zztomato

Member
Messages
11,391
People make way to big a deal over a headstock repair. If repaired properly, it has no impact on the performance of the guitar and will likely never break in the same place if dropped. It's a great way to get a vintage guitar at a deep discount. Remove 1/3 of book value. Worth considering if it's priced anywhere from 3-4k. You get a chance to play it before buying which is rare for most of us.
 

ewheel

Member
Messages
202
They always sound better after a headstock repair done properly. Also good point for negotiation. Good luck!
 

gmann

Member
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9,072
I have been watching these closely, because I want one too.

$4K to $6K depending on cosmetic condition if all original and no repairs. The headstock repair, while still being a nice guitar, can devalue by half. So I am guessing $2500 would be a good price based upon your description. Maybe a little more if it really "speaks" to you.

Certainly no more than 3K. If properly done, it will have no effect on function. I would imagine it broke at it's most vulnerable point, it will never break there again and while it could break somewhere else, it's less likely. Still, a headstock break is a good negotiating point when buying a player guitar, assuming all else is good to go.
 

Krausewitz

Member
Messages
3,841
I'd say it's worth $2,000 - $3,000. The vintage market still seems really flaccid, and the headstock break brings the price down even more.
 

simonm

making the world fuzzier, one pedal at a time
Silver Supporting Member
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1,184
I'd say it's worth $2,000 - $3,000.

I was checking out Junior prices for a year or two before I found a fixer upper with no electrics for $1200, so I think this estimation is right. A lot depends on the cosmetics over and above the repair, if it's a repaired crack you can't see from the front with the screenprinting intact and everything else is clean = upper end.
 

WoodenDuckMaker

Senior Member
Messages
1,978
Vintage guitars really aren't doing so hot right now. Probably as a result of 3 factors. The economy, the prime buying demographic becoming too old, and guitar oriented music becoming less popular.

The people who grew up in the 50s and 60's and really identify with those guitars are in their 60s and 70's now.

My local rock station often plays 5 songs in a row that have no guitar in them at all. Guitar oriented music is becoming a niche.
 

Powderfinger

Platinum Supporting Member
Messages
11,776
I have a 1960 with an ugly looking headstock repair. I paid 2K here a couple of years ago. Thought that was a great buy. It sounds awesome.
 

DrumBob

Member
Messages
18,754
I'd say it's worth $2,000 - $3,000. The vintage market still seems really flaccid, and the headstock break brings the price down even more.

This is correct. My guess would be $2500 max, if the repair was done properly and neatly. There are a lot of Juniors on the market at all times. Some of them sit on Fleabay for months before they sell.
 




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